Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Social Justice' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 DECEMBER 2016

Towards data justice? The ambiguity of anti-surveillance resistance in political activism

"The Snowden leaks, first published in June 2013, provided unprecedented insights into the operations of state-corporate surveillance, highlighting the extent to which everyday communication is integrated into an extensive regime of control that relies on the 'datafication' of social life. Whilst such data-driven forms of governance have significant implications for citizenship and society, resistance to surveillance in the wake of the Snowden leaks has predominantly centred on techno-legal responses relating to the development and use of encryption and policy advocacy around privacy and data protection. Based on in-depth interviews with a range of social justice activists, we argue that there is a significant level of ambiguity around this kind of anti-surveillance resistance in relation to broader activist practices, and critical responses to the Snowden leaks have been confined within particular expert communities. Introducing the notion of 'data justice', we therefore go on to make the case that resistance to surveillance needs to be (re)conceptualized on terms that can address the implications of this data-driven form of governance in relation to broader social justice agendas. Such an approach is needed, we suggest, in light of a shift to surveillance capitalism in which the collection, use and analysis of our data increasingly comes to shape the opportunities and possibilities available to us and the kind of society we live in."

(Lina Dencik, Arne Hintz and Jonathan Cable, 2016)

TAGS

2016 • activist practices • anti-surveillance resistance • Arne Hintz • big data • collection and processing of data • critical responses • Danielle Citron • data collection • data collection and retention • data encryption • data justice • data processes • data protectiondata security • data tracking • data-driven form of governance • data-driven forms of governance • datafication • datafication of social life • David Lyon • Edward Snowden • everyday communication • Frank Pasquale • individual rights • John Sylvia IV • Jonathan Cable • Lina Dencik • Miriyam Aouragh • Natasha Dow • personal data • policy advocacy • political activism • politics of data-driven processes • privacy • privacy and the protection of personal data • profiling • protection of personal data • regime of control • resistance to surveillance • retention of informationsocial justice • social justice activists • social justice agendas • social life • societal implications of data collection • state-corporate surveillance • surveillance • techno-legal responses

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2011

Zoontechnica Journal redirective design futures

"A variety of designers and researchers address issues of concern to contemporary design thinking in this first issue1 of Zoontechnica (not counting the pre–issue, now archived). All grapple with questions about how design can, in more substantial ways, contribute to sustaining those things that need to be sustained, like social justice, equity, diversity and critical thinking. ...

It is now widely acknowledged that design has played a central role in creating and sustaining cultures of consumption that continue to use up resources, burn fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases that lead to climate change, and so on. What's less recognized is that these are not just biophysical problems to be solved by technologies, but that the unsustainable is often that which is closest to us, the everyday world in which we feel comfortable, secure and accommodated (herein lies a dilemma for user–centred design–what to do about user needs/desires that clearly contribute to unsustainability?). Being–in–the–world is being with designed things, structures and spaces that design our modes of being. Sometimes this is obvious, 'the designed' declaring itself as such,but mostly, the designed nature of our worlds is invisible to us, and when everything is working as it should, we feel at ease. We shouldn't. So much of what functions seamlessly now, saves time, delivers convenience, gives pleasure, etc– is actually taking futures away."

(Anne–Marie Willis, November 2011)

1

TAGS

academic journal • Anne-Marie Willis • anthropometrics • being-in-the-world • biophysical • Brunel University • Chris McGinley • climate changeconsumptionconveniencecritical thinking • cultures of consumption • Daniel Sobol • designdesign futuresdesign thinkingdesigned spacesdesigned things • Donald Welch • Emmanuel Levinas • environmental change • equity • ethicseverydayfossil fuelgreenhouse gases • Griffith University • human factorshuman-centred design • Jason Robertson • Jennifer Loy • Marc Steen • modes of being • Nada Filipovic • our world • QCA Griffith University • Queensland College of Art • redesign • redirective • reflexive practice • RMIT • Robert Macredie • social changesocial justicesustainability • the designed • time savingTony Fry • unsustainability • unsustainableuser needsUser-Centred Design (UCD) • Zoontechnica

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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