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Which clippings match 'William Butler Yeats' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 MAY 2015

Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19

"Established in 1913 by the painter and influential art critic Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective, whose members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and other artists of the Bloomsbury Group.

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega)."

(The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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1913 • 1919 • Alvaro Guevara • art movement • avant-garde art movement • Bloomsbury Group • bold new designs • British designceramicsclothing design • Cuthbert Hamilton • decorative artsdesign collectivedesign history • design of domestic products • Duncan Grant • Edward McKnight Kauffer • Edward Morgan ForsterEdward Wadsworth • Edward Wolfe • Frederick Etchells • furniture designGeorge Bernard Shaw • Gertrude Stein • Henri Gaudier-Brzeska • home furnishingsinterior design • Israel Zangwill • Jesse Etchells • Lady Ian Hamilton • Lady Maud Cunard • Lady Ottoline Morrell • linen design • linocutlithography • Mikhail Larionov • mosaicnew approaches • Nina Hamnett • Omega artists • Omega Workshops • painted furniture • painted murals • painted silks and linens • Pamela Diamand • Roger Fry • rug • Somerset House • stained glasstablewaretextile design • The Courtauld Institute of Art • upholstery • Vanessa Bell • vibrant abstract design • Virginia WoolfWilliam Butler Yeats • Winifred Gill • woodblock prints • woven wools • Wyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

Human communities depend upon a diversity of talent

"One of the real challenges is to innovate fundamentally in education. Innovation is hard because it means doing something that people don't find very easy, for the most part. It means challenging what we take for granted, things that we think are obvious. The great problem for reform or transformation is the tyranny of common sense; things that people think, 'Well, it can't be done any other way because that's the way it's done.'"

(Ken Robinson, February 2010)

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2010 • ability • Abraham Lincoln • Al Gorebatching people • broken model • common sense • conception of abilityconformitydigitised world • disenthrall • diversity of talent • dogma • education dislocates • education innovationeducation reform • education revolution • education system • Eric Clapton • fast food model • having original ideas that have value • human communities • human development • human flourishing • human resourcesindustrial model of educationintelligence • Jamie Oliver • Jeremy BenthamKen Robinson • kindergarten • learning revolutionlinearity • live for the weekend • manufacturing model • Maud Gonne • mechanical process • Natalie Merchant • natural talents • order of things • organic process • our talents • pre-digital culture • previous centuries • quiet past • rise with the occasion • single function device • standardisation • stormy present • take for granted • talentTED TalksteenagerWilliam Butler Yeats • wristwatch • Zagat

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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