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Which clippings match 'Thin Film' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 AUGUST 2013

A proof of concept of technology which is born to die

"John Rogers is a professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the university. Rogers says the goal of the 'born to die' program is to design transient technology that can dissolve at the end of its useful life, thus saving space in landfills and reducing waste. The research team isn't there yet. But it has designed a chip built on a thin film of silk that dissolves when hit with water."

(Associated Press)

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TAGS

applied research • Associated Press • born to die • design innovationdesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumption • dissolvable materials • e-wasteelectronicsend of lifeimpermanenceinorganic refuse • John Rogers • material interventionsmaterial worldmaterials sciencenew materialsobsolescenceproof of conceptself-destroyingself-destructing • silk • thin filmthrow-away • transient tech • transient technology • University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • useful life • water soluble

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JUNE 2009

Fabrication of organic transistors through printing

"Another important characteristic of organic transistors is the simplicity of the method used to produce them. Inorganic transistors require massive vacuum systems and complex manufacturing processes. However, most organic materials can be dissolved in organic solvents to create 'inks' that can be used to create circuits simply by printing them under normal atmospheric conditions. Printing technology can also be readily adapted to the production of flexible substrates and large substrates. With the methods used to manufacture conventional inorganic transistors, only a few percent of the materials are actually used. Printing is far more efficient, and by optimizing the method it is possible to achieve usage rates as high as 90%. For this reason, this manufacturing method is also attractive from an environmental perspective. Sony is currently conducting research into the fabrication of organic transistors through printing."
(Sony Corporation, 2009)

1). N. Yoneya, N. Hirai, N. Kawashima, M. Noda, K. Nomoto, M. Wada, J. Kasahara, I. Yagi, K. Tsukagoshi, Y. Aoyagi, Digest of Tech. Papers of AM–LCD 05, 25 (2005).
2). I. Yagi, N. Hirai, M. Noda, A. Imaoka, Y. Miyamoto, N. Yoneya, K. Nomoto, J. Kasahara, A. Yumoto, T.Urabe, Society for Information Display 07 Digest , 1753(2007). Sony press release: http://www.sony.co.jp/SonyInfo/News/Press/200705/07–053/

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TAGS

devicediscoverydisplaydisplay technologyengineeringfabricationflexibleLCD • Organic TFT • organic transistors • OTFT • plastic • polymer • polymer organic TFT • printingproduct designresearchscreenSonytechnology • TFT • TFT-LCD • thin film • thin-film transistor • transistor

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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