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Which clippings match 'Cartographic Representations' keyword pg.1 of 1
23 FEBRUARY 2014

Mercator Projection versus the Gall-Peters Projection Maps

Fig.1 West Wing (television) season 2, episode 16, "Somebody's Going to Emergency, Somebody's Going to Jail".

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TAGS

Arno Peters • cartographic metaphorcartographic representationscartographycultural constructscultural hegemony • cylindrical equal-area projection • equal-area cylindric projection • equal-area map projection • Eurocentric legacy • Gall-Peters Projection Map • geographygraphic representationhistorical narrativeshow we see the worldinformation visualisation • James Gall • map • map design • maps • Mercator Projection Map • metaphors of realityphysical geographypolitics of cartographyprojectionspatial representationspatial symbolismsymbolic meaning • The West Wing (television) • unexamined assumptionsvisual representationworld mapsworld view

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 NOVEMBER 2013

Using the physical territory of a country as its own map

"'And then came the grandest idea of all! We actually made a map of the country, on the scale of a mile to the mile!' 'Have you used it much?' I enquired. 'It has never been spread out, yet,' said Mein Herr. 'The farmers objected: they said it would cover the whole country, and shut out the sunlight! So we now use the country itself, as its own map, and I assure you it does nearly as well.'"

(Lewis Carroll, 1893)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 APRIL 2013

Eurocentrism permeates our common cartographic representations

"on most maps, Europe and North America are situated on top–allowing us to believe that these countries are really 'on top of the world'. Africa, Australia and South America are always situated at the bottom. Why never the other way around? Cartographers make assumptions about the world (North is assumed to be at the top) and these assumptions have become normalised and are viewed as 'common sense'.

But these politically embedded assumptions help to structure how we see the world and our place in it. Few of us ever stop to think about the politics of cartography and what it says about Western cultural and economic imperialism and domination. Few ever think how these unexamined assumptions structure the way we see ourselves, to what extent and on what basis we rate our own worth (or supposed, entirely imagined, lack thereof) or how it restricts our imagination and limits the ways in which we think it is possible to excel and thrive in this world."

(Pierre De Vos, 23 April 2013)

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TAGS

Africa • apolitical • assumptionsAustraliaBritish Librarycartographic metaphorcartographic representationscartographychartcultural artefactcultural hegemonycultural imperialism • economic imperialism • economic significance • Eurocentric legacy • Eurocentrism • Europegeopolitical mapgraphic representationhistorical maphistorical narrativeshow we see the worldinformation visualisationinterpretationmapsmetaphors of reality • neo-European • neutralnormalisation process • normalised • North America • Northern hemisphere • objective perspective • our place in the world • physical geography • political assumptions • politics of cartographypost-colonialismpostcolonial • postcoloniality • reterritorialisationSouth AfricaSouth America • Southern hemisphere • standardised classification • The Lie of the Land (exhibition) • the worldthe world around us • top • understanding of the worldunexamined assumptions • visual critique • visual representationworld mapsworld politicsworld view

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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