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Which clippings match 'British Television' keyword pg.1 of 2
26 SEPTEMBER 2014

The Prisoner: the cult British television series

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1960s • Alcatraz • allegory • Angelo Muscat • art and technologyballoonBritish televisionBritish television series • Butlins • captors • coastal resort • coastal village resort • Colin Gordon • countercultural themes • cult televisiondemocracy • Denis Shaw • drama series • Fenella Fielding • Frank Maher • freedom • gilded cage • Gwynedd • held prisoner • individuality • inmate • Kafkaesque • Leo McKern • meteorological balloon • mysterious place • ominous • Patrick McGoohan • Penrhyndeudraeth • personal identity • Peter Swanwick • plotting to escape • Portmeirion • prisoner • psychological drama • roverscience fictionscientific progresssecret agent • spy fiction • surrealistic setting • television series • The Prisoner (television) • villageWales • war of attrition • white balloon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2014

The Adventure of English: the evolution of the English language

"The Adventure of English is a British television series (ITV) on the history of the English presented by Melvyn Bragg as well as a companion book, also written by Bragg. The series ran in 2003.

The series and the book are cast as an adventure story, or the biography of English as if it were a living being, covering the history of the language from its modest beginnings around 500 AD as a minor Germanic dialect to its rise as a truly established global language.

In the television series, Bragg explains the origins and spelling of many words based on the times in which they were introduced into the growing language that would eventually become modern English."

[Complete eight part series available on YouTube distributed by Maxwell's collection Pty Limited, Australia]

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2002 • A Dictionary of the English Language • American English • American Spelling Book • Anglo-SaxonArabicaristocracyAustraliaAustralian Aborigineauthoritative historyBible • Blue Backed Speller • British televisionCaribbean • Catherine of Aragon • Celtic language • Celts • Church of England • cockney rhyming slang • colonisationcommon languagecommunication • Convicts land • dialectdictionaryDutch • educated people • English languageEsperantoFrenchFrench languageFrisian • Frisian language • Gaelic • Germanic rootsgrammarGreek • Gullah language • Hebrew • Henry V of England • Henry VIII of England • historical eventshistoryhistory of ideas • History of the English language • history of useimmigrationIndiaindustrial revolutioninvasionIsaac NewtonITVJamaicanJane Austen • John Cheke • John WycliffeJonathan Swift • Joseph McCoy • Katherine Duncan-Jones • King James I • languagelanguage developmentLatin wordlinguisticsmedieval churchMelvyn Braggmini-series • modern English • Netherlands • Noah Webster • North America • Old English • peasant • Philip Sidne • pidgin • pronunciation • Queen Elizabeth I • Robert Burns • Rural Rides • Samuel JohnsonSanskritScotland • Scottish language • scripture • spelling • Squanto • television series • The Adventure of English (2002) • theologian • Thomas Sheridan • United Statesuse of wordsvikingvocabulary • Websters Dictionary • West Africa • William Cobbett • William Jones • William Shakespeare • William the Conqueror • William Tyndale • William Wordsworth • words

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JULY 2014

Teenage subculture identities discussed in 1979 on UK youth TV programme Something Else

"In this edition from Birmingham, the Coventry band the Specials had just finished playing and George is sitting beside Martin Degville, just in front of Jane Kahn, partner in the seminal outrage shop Kahn & Bell."

(David Johnson, 28 June 2010)

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1970s197970s televisionaggression • BBC Community Programmes • BBC TVBBC2Birmingham • Boy George • British televisionclothescounterculturecultural codescultural normscultural signalsdisaffected youthdressing upfashionfashionable fad • fighting • George ODowd • identity performanceimpression managementinnocence • Jane Kahn • Kahn and Bell • magazine programme • make-up • Martin Degville • naivety • new romantics • prejudicepunk rock • punks • rebellionsocial norms • Something Else (TV series) • street fashionsubcultureteddy boyteenage rebellionteenager • The Specials • urban clothingyouth culture • youth culture magazine programme • youth subculture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2013

The Adventures of Portland Bill

"Portland Bill was another wonderful children's adventure very much in the style of Postman Pat, Gran, The Herbs, and The Clangers. It concerned the day to day life of Portland Bill (Head lighthouse man of the Lighthouse Guillemot Rock). He is helped by the other lighthouse men Ross and Cromarty. The nearest village to the lighthouse was on the mainland and it was called McGuillycuddy. Here the boys are able to pick up supplies and interact with a whole load of characters. The adventures were by John Grace and were produced in 1983."

(Iain Ratchford, Little Gems)

Designed by John Grace and Barry Leith; Assistant Animators Humphrey Leadbitter and Heather Boucher; Model Makers Martin Cheek, Gordon Tait and Linda Thodesen; Music by John Grace and Mik Parsons; Editor Robert Dunbar; Assistant Editor Andi Sloss; Production Co–ordinator Barrie Edwards; Stories Adapted for TV by Ian Sachs; Executive Producer Graham Clutterbuch; Filmfair Presentation John Grace / Filmfair MCMLXXXIII.

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1980s1983 • Andi Sloss • Barrie Edwards • Barry Leith • British televisionchildrens televisionclaymation • FilmFair • Gordon Tait • Graham Clutterbuck • Gran (TV series) • Granada Television • Heather Boucher • Humphrey Leadbitter • Ian Sachs • John Grace • lighthouse • Linda Thodesen • Magic Roundabout • maritime • Maritime England • Martin Cheek • Mik Parsons • nautical • plasticine • Portland (Dorset) • Postman Pat (TV series) • Robert Dunbar • sea • shipping forecast • South of Englandstop motion animationstop-frame animation • The Adventures of Portland Bill (TV series) • The Clangers (TV series) • The Herbs (TV series) • theme musictheme tuneUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 OCTOBER 2013

The enduring legacy of The World At War

"The World at War had many strengths but the key to its success as compelling history television was the formidable array of interviewees. Top military leaders, including German naval commander Karl Doenitz and the head of RAF Bomber Command, Arthur Harris, had their say alongside humble soldiers, sailors and airmen. Key politicians like wartime foreign secretary Sir Anthony Eden shed light on the war's wider arc, while ordinary citizens told of events from their perspective. Several members of Hitler's inner circle were also tracked down and interviewed, including his valet, secretary and adjutant. Death camp survivors told their terrible tales, as did a few of their shamefaced captors. More years have now passed since the making of The World at War than elapsed between 1945 and the programme's first showing in 1973. So, sadly, a programme like this can never be made again: the number of living witnesses to World War II is dwindling every day. We are fortunate that Isaacs and his team had the vision and talent to make The World at War when they did."

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19451973Adolf Hitler • Anthony Eden • archive footage • Arthur Harris • British television • Carl Davis • Charles de Gaulle • Charles Douglas-Home • David Elstein • death camp • definitive account • documentary evidence • foreign secretary • Franklin D. RooseveltHarry Truman • Hideki Tojo • historical chronicleshistory • history television • inner circle • interviews • Jeremy Isaacs • Joseph Stalin • Karl Doenitz • Laurence Olivier • military campaign • military historymilitary leader • naval commander • Nazi • Neville Chamberlain • Noble Frankland • politician • RAF Bomber Command • sailor • social historysoldiersurvivor • Ted Childs • television documentarytelevision programmetelevision seriesThames Television • The World at War • UKTV • warwartimeWinston ChurchillwitnessWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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