Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'WWII' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 NOVEMBER 2016

Alex Gendler: how to recognize a dystopia

"The genre of dystopia – the 'not good place'– has captured the imaginations of artists and audiences alike for centuries. But why do we bother with all this pessimism? Alex Gendler explains how dystopias act as cautionary tales – not about some particular government or technology, but the very idea that humanity can be molded into an ideal shape."

1

TAGS

Aldous Huxley • Alex Gendler • Animal Farm (1954)artificial intelligence • aryan • atomic energyBlade Runner (1982)brave new world • Brave New World (1932) • cautionary talecommunist systemconcentration campdemocracydepletion of natural resourcesDr Strangelove (1964) • drudgery • dystopia • dystopian fiction • dystopian literature • dystopian science fictioneugenicsfactory workerfascismfree willgas chambergenetic engineering • Gullivers Travels (1726) • H G Wells • humanitys future • impoverished masses • impoverishment • industrial ageindustrial revolution • industrial warfare • It Cant Happen Here (1935) • Jack London • Jonathan Swift • mass entertainment • mass media ageMetropolis (1927) • modern anxieties • nightmare world • Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)nuclear war • oligarchy • oppressionoverpopulationparadise • perfect world • political structures • povertyprogress narratives • resource depletion • science fiction • Sinclair Lewis • slumsocial rolessocial structures • space colony • space travelspeculative fiction • squalor • surveillance state • TED-Ed • The Handmaids Tale (1985) • The Iron Heel (1908) • The RepublicThe Time MachineThomas Moretotalitarianism • tyrannical oligarchy • tyranny of modernismutopia • V for Vendetta (2006) • Watchmen (2009) • We (1924) • Westworld (1973) • WW1WWII • Yevgeny Zamyatin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 APRIL 2014

British Pathe releases 85,000 films on YouTube

"Newsreel archive British Pathé has uploaded its entire collection of 85,000 historic films, in high resolution, to its YouTube channel. This unprecedented release of vintage news reports and cinemagazines is part of a drive to make the archive more accessible to viewers all over the world.

'Our hope is that everyone, everywhere who has a computer will see these films and enjoy them,' says Alastair White, General Manager of British Pathé. 'This archive is a treasure trove unrivalled in historical and cultural significance that should never be forgotten. Uploading the films to YouTube seemed like the best way to make sure of that.'

British Pathé was once a dominant feature of the British cinema experience, renowned for first–class reporting and an informative yet uniquely entertaining style. It is now considered to be the finest newsreel archive in existence. Spanning the years from 1896 to 1976, the collection includes footage–not only from Britain, but from around the globe–ofmajor events, famous faces, fashion trends, travel, sport and culture. The archive is particularly strong in its coverage of the First and Second World Wars.

Alastair White continues: 'Whether you're looking for coverage of the Royal Family, the Titanic, the destruction of the Hindenburg, or quirky stories about British pastimes, it'll be there on our channel. You can lose yourself for hours.'

This project is being managed by German company Mediakraft, which has been responsible for numerous past YouTube successes. The company will be creating new content using British Pathé material, in English and in foreign languages."

(The British Pathé Archive, 17 April 2014)

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

TAGS

1896 • 1976 • Alastair White • amateur photographerarchival materialarchiveBritish filmBritish PatheBritish Royal Family • cinemagazine • cosmeticscultural collecting organisationscultural heritagedigitisation project • Edward Curtis • factory girlfactory workerfilm archive • film collection • filmed news stories • First World War • footagehair styling • heat exchanger • heat pump • Hindenburg disaster • historic filmhistorical collection • holiday camp • Mediakraft • national cultural heritage onlinenews reportnewsreel • newsreel archive • pastimes • Playboy Bunny • Playboy Club • promotion and dissemination • RMS Titanic • sea travel • Second World Warshort subjectssocial history • Titanic disaster • travelogue • vintage films • WWIWWIIYouTubeYouTube channel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JANUARY 2012

Auckland War Memorial Museum: Cenotaph Database

"Search for biographical and service details for over 115,000 New Zealand service men and women from the 19th century till today and especially from World War One and World War Two."

(Auckland War Memorial Museum)

Fig.1 [3] Portrait, WW2, soldier standing in front of jeep, wooden hut, cigarette in hand, wearing beret. Godfrey Perkins 20/641254 at Mizuba 1946.

Fig.2 [4] Group soldiers, Perenchies, Germany. Wilfred B Quennell 1st row standing 4th from left, scanned from copy of original.

1

2

TAGS

19th centuryANZACAotearoa New Zealandarchive • Auckland War Memorial Museum • Australasia • battalion • biographical • cenotaph • collectionCommonwealthcultural heritage • Dardanelles • databasedigital heritage • expeditionary force • family historyGermanyhistorical record • historical records • history • infantry • J Force • Japan • Jayforce • men in uniform • militarymuseumnational cultural heritage onlinenational heritage • Perenchies • postcard • PoW • prisoner of war • repositorysearchsearch engine • service details • servicemen • servicewoman • social historysoldier • Somme • warwar memorialWorld War IWorld War IIWWIWWII

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2011

An interactive system defines a virtual space

"An interactive system defines a virtual space, whether the system's interface provides access to the inhospitable planet of Stroggos or the Microsoft Windows desktop. Users of both these systems interact with a place, one created by a computer and in which users and computational agents carry out their individual and collective activities. The intuitive and often–discussed benefit of a well–designed interface metaphor is that it allows users to carry over conventions from their 'real' experience when performing tasks within the interface world.

Another key and often unarticulated value of an interface arises from the interface's mimetic quality. While mimesis is often discussed by narrative theorists as a contrast to diegesis, distinguishing the concepts of showing versus telling (Aristotle), my emphasis here is to distinguish between an artifact that is intended to be an imitation of something, but is not really that thing and an artifact that is intended to be mistaken as that thing. An example of the former case would be a film of a fictional account of the D–Day landing on the beaches of Normandy. An example of the later might be a virtual reality system displaying photo–realistic graphical images of a physical space. D–Days stories like The Longest Day and Saving Private Ryan are, in some ways, imitations, and so are more mimetic than VR systems whose design is intended to '...produce synthetic images visually and measurably indistinguishable from real world images.' (Greenberg 1999)(pg. 45)."

(R. Michael Young, 1999)

Greenberg, D. P. 1999. 'A framework for realistic image synthesis'. Communications of the ACM 42(8):45–53.

1). R. Michael Young (1999). 'Notes on the Use of Plan Structures in the Creation of Interactive Plot', Papers from the 1999 Fall Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Symposium

TAGS

1999 • AAAI • AristotleAssociation for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence • computational agents • conventionsD-Day landingdesktop metaphordiegesis • Donald P. Greenberg • fictional account • graphical images • image synthesis • imitation of something • imitations • interact with a place • interactive narrative • interactive system • interface metaphor • interface world • intuitiveMicrosoft Windowsmimesis • mimetic quality • mistaken as that thing • narrative theory • Normandy • performing tasks • photo-realistic • physical space • real experience • real world images • realism • Saving Private Ryan • showing • stories • Stroggos • synthetic images • telling • The Longest Day • usersvirtual heritagevirtual realityvirtual reality systemvirtual space • VR systems • WWII

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

Walt Disney and the Art of WWII Propaganda

"During World War II, Disney's provided some political education for Americans at home –– and for soldiers on the front, too. 'Education for Death: The Making of the Nazi' appeared in movie theaters in 1943. The tone of the movie was serious, and it didn't feature the likes of Donald Duck or Mickey Mouse. Instead, it used impressive images to describe how children in Nazi Germany were raised to hate and to participate in the war effort –– and how little blonde Hans' only purpose in life was to die on the front."

(Sven Stillich, 2009)

1

TAGS

1943Adolf Hitleranimation • anti-Nazi • cartooncel animationchildren • Clyde Geronimi • die • Donald Duck • emotive manipulationenculturationethics • Gregor Ziemer • hate • Hitler Youth • Mickey MouseNaziNazi Germany • North Americans • patriotismpolitical educationpropaganda • The Making of the Nazi • traditional animationWalt DisneywarWorld War IIWWII

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.