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Which clippings match 'Work' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 JANUARY 2012

Tony Schwartz: The Myths of the Overworked Creative

"The only reserves that last are those we renew. This applies to us personally and ecologically.

Time is finite, but we act as if it were otherwise, assuming that longer hours always lead to increased productivity. But in reality our bodies are designed to pulse and pause – to expend energy and then renew it.

This is a long presentation, but it has many great insights – including the reminder that we are most effective, efficient and creative when we give absorbed attention to one thing at a time. Renewing and cultivating our personal energy is a key criteria for working at our full potential in the 21st century..."

(Nick Potter on 22 January 2012, Intersect)

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21st centuryability to focus • absorbed attention • behavioural change • capacity • demand • distraction • effective • efficiencyenergy • expend energy • focus • fully rested • increased productivityinformation overload • multitasking • myths • overloadpause • personal energy • professional experiencepulse • pulse and pause • renew • rising demand • sleep deprive • task-shifting • the overworked creative • wandering mindswork • working

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JANUARY 2011

The liberal and servile arts: internal justification versus external purpose

"'Liberal arts,' therefore, are ways of human action which have their justification in themselves; 'servile arts' are ways of human action that have a purpose outside of themselves, a purpose, to be more exact, which consists in a useful effect that can be realized through praxis. The 'liberality' or 'freedom' of the liberal arts consists in their not being disposable for purposes, that they do not need to be legitimated by a social function, by being 'work.'"

(Josef Pieper, 1998, p.41)

Pieper, J. (1998). 'Leisure, the Basis of Culture'. South Bend, Indiana, St. Augustine's Press.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 APRIL 2007

Images do not embody information about their use

"Most of the knowledge that we have of pre–literate societies comes from the interpretation of archaeological 'works' that have survived. However, key aspects of the argument are speculative. Let me take as an example the cave paintings at Lascaux. Opinion is divided about whether the paintings show a hunting expedition or represent a ritual activity in which image–animals are slaughtered symbolically as an auspicious prelude to the actual hunt. The reason that this important distinction cannot be reliably made is because the images do not embody information about their use, i.e. whether it is depictive or symbolic. This is not a problem confined to objects of great antiquity. For example, there is little material difference between a pair of chop–sticks and a pair of knitting–needles except the cultures in which they are found and the way in which they are used. This is even more apparent if one considers that there is nothing about their physical form that prevents them being exchanged and the one used for the purpose of the other."

(Michael A. R. Biggs, 2003, Practice as Research in Performance)

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