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Which clippings match 'Wired (magazine)' keyword pg.1 of 3
25 APRIL 2015

Supersymmetry: a immersive aesthetic experience by Ryoji Ikeda

"Supersymmetry attempts to transform the complexity of quantum information theory into an immersive aesthetic experience, meshing sound, visual data and high-speed light displays. The show pairs two inter-related installations. As you step into the cavernous, pitch-black space at the top of Brewer Street Car Park in Soho, you're confronted by [experiment]. Three 1m x 1m light boxes, glowing white, skitter and whoosh with tiny ball bearings, forming unique and unpredictable patterns. It's a disorientating experience, leaving you feeling adrift in such a frenetic space, with red lasers constantly scanning the surface movements.

As you step through the curtain into the next space, [experience], you're plunged into the middle of two 20m-long screens, blinking with forty monitors, all displaying how the previous room's data has been analysed and translated. The synchronized monitors pulse with high-speed analyses and typed text, while the electronic soundscape -- a symphony of bleeps, buzzes and droning hums -- adds to the charged atmosphere. The overall effect, as you glance at the mutating text and the rapid-fire bombardment of data, is both hypnotic and hallucinatory, and yet there's also something strangely oppressive about being caught in this endless loop of sound and information."

(Daniel Culpan, 23 April 2015, Wired)

"Supersymmetry" by Ryoji Ikeda, 2015. The exhibition runs at The Vinyl Factory Space at Brewer Street Car Park, London, W1F 0LA, until 31 May 2015.

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2015aesthetic experienceart and scienceart exhibitionartist in residence • artistic response • austere ambienceball bearings • beeps • bleeps • buzzes • CERN • charged atmosphere • complexity • dark space • disorientating experience • droning • electronic soundscape • emotionally empty art • endless loop • hallucinatory • Higgs boson • humming • hyper-sensory experience • hypnoticimmersive aesthetic experience • Japanese artist • Japanese visual artist • Large Hadron Collider • light installationlight pulseslightboxmodernist aesthetics • multistorey building • particle accelerator • particle research • physics • quantum information theory • Ryoji Ikeda • sound and imagestrobing • Supersymmetry (2015) • symmetry • The Vinyl Factory • unique patterns • unpredictable patterns • visual artistvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisual spectacular • whooshes • Wired (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2015

The Creepy Collective Behavior of Boston Dynamics' New Robot Dog

"Robotics company Boston Dynamics has a new four–legged addition to its family: a 160–pound quadruped named Spot...

We know from Spot's reaction to that kick that he can dynamically correct his stability–behavior that's modeled after biological systems. From what Couzin can tell, the robots' collective movement is an organic outgrowth of that self–correction. When the two Spots collide at the 1:25 mark, they're both able to recover quickly from the nudge and continue on their route up the hill. 'But the collision does result in them tending to align with one another (since each pushes against the other),' Couzin wrote in an email. 'That can be an important factor: Simple collisions among individuals can result in collective motion.'

In Couzin's research on locusts, for example, the insects form plagues that move together by just barely avoiding collisions. 'Recently, avoidance has also been shown to allow the humble fruit fly to make effective collective decisions,' he wrote.

It doesn't look like Spot is programmed to work with his twin brothers and sisters–but that doesn't matter if their coordination emerges naturally from the physical rules that govern each individual robot. Clearly, bumping into each other isn't the safest or most efficient way to get your robot army to march in lock step, but it's a good start. And it's relatively easy to imagine several Spots working together in organized ways if the LIDAR sensors fitted on their 'heads' were programmed to create avoidance behaviors–like those locusts–rather than simply reacting to collisions.

Spot's life–like motions are uncanny, but when you add this emergent, collective behavior–which can sometimes be unpredictable–the possibilities get downright scary. Will Spot's group dynamics stop at the point of swarming like locusts? (Ominous.) Will they cluster into self–protecting balls like sardines? (Less so.) Or could they end up as smart and responsive as humans?

Couzin goes so far as to call this bump–and–grind between Spots One and Two a social interaction. 'No matter how primitive, there's no doubt that these interactions could enhance the decision–making capabilities of such robots when they must make their own, autonomous, decisions in an uncertain world,' he wrote. We'll just have to hope that decision–making involves not trampling us when a pack of Spots starts stampeding like wildebeest."

(Neel V. Patel, 11 February 2015 Wired News)

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2015animal locomotionartificial lifeautomataautonomous creature • avoidance behaviour • biological systems • Boston Dynamics • bumping • collective animal behavior • collective behaviour • collective decisions • collective motion • collective movement • collision detection • decision-making capabilitiesdogfruit flyherd • Iain Couzin • LIDARlocomotionmechanical being • nudge • physical rules • quadruped • robot army • robot dog • robot machinesrobotic creaturerobotics • self-correction • social interactionspeculative engineering • Spot (robot) • stabilityswarming • swarming locusts • walkingWired (magazine) • Wired News

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2014

Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet, 1974

"The year is 1974, and Arthur C. Clarke is standing inside one of those cavernous computer centers that held the massive machines of the day. ...

He doesn't call it the internet. But he says that even before the dawn of the twenty–first century, the boy's home will include a computer console – something much smaller than those massive machines humming in the background in 1974 – that provides 'all the information he needs for his everyday life: his bank statements, his theater reservations, all the information you need over the course of living in a complex modern society.' ...

'They will make it possible to live really anywhere we like. Any businessman, any executive, could live almost anywhere on Earth and still do his business through a device like this,' he says. 'It means we won't be stuck in cities. We'll live out in the country or wherever we please and still carry on complete interactions with other human beings as well as computers.' Our cities haven't exactly shrunk. But we're certainly able to connect with each other from wherever we might be."

(Cade Metz , March 2013, Wired.com)

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19742001ABC TV (Australia) • Arthur C Clarke • Australian Broadcasting Corporation • computer centre • computer console • connected worldconnectivity • every household • future forecastingfuturisthome computer • household computer • Internetpredicting the futurepunch cards • punch-card reader • science fiction writer • tape drives • translocationWired (magazine)world connectivity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 OCTOBER 2014

Feb. 8, 1996: We (Mostly) Celebrate 24 Hours in Cyberspace

"24 Hours in Cyberspace was the inspiration of photographer Rick Smolan, who created the 'Day in the Life' photo-essay series. Smolan used the same formula as 'Day in the Life,' recruiting 150 photojournalists to go out and chronicle a slice of everyday life, in this case as it pertained to the then-counterculturish phenomenon of the web.

The technology of the internet was not the subject: Smolan wanted (and got) pictures of how different people in different cultures were using the internet, and the effect that the medium of cyberspace was having on their lives.

The resulting work was edited and then displayed on a website. It also appeared as the cover story of that week's edition of U.S. News and World Report and, soon thereafter, as a coffee-table book."

(Wired.com, 8 February 2008)

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1996 • 24 hours • 24 Hours in Cyberspace (1996) • 8 February 1996 • a single day • book • coffee-table book • cyberspacedaily lifeday in the life • digital time capsule • glimpse • influence of the web • innocence • lives touched by the web • photographer • photographers around the world • random collection • Rick Smolan • single day on the internet • time capsule • visually capture • webWired (magazine)world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 OCTOBER 2014

Ototo: bespoke musical instruments with pocket-sized circuit board

"Ototo–a pocket–sized circuit board in the mold of the Arduino and MaKey MaKey that was was designed to be a 'musical invention kit' and helps kids build bespoke electronic instruments without writing a line of code or burning a single finger on a soldering iron. It can play music out of the box with the 12 black and white triangles acting like piano keys and a surface–mounted speaker emitting sound, but it's killer application is the ability to create outlandish orchestras by connecting it to funky objects with alligator clips. Plants become percussive instruments, sauce pans become a drum set, and even simple pencil sketches can produce unique sounds when tapped."

(Joseph Flaherty, 22 October 2013, Wired)

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alligator clip • analogue correspondenceArduino • bespoke instruments • bespoke musical instruments • circuit boardcommonplace objectscreative playcreative technology • crocodile clip • design and technologydevicedo-it-yourselfgadget • gizmo • interaction designinteractive objects • Joseph Pleass • Kickstarterkit • low-tech music • MaKey MaKey • Mark McKeague • music making technologyOtotoout-of-the-boxphysical and digital interactionpocket-sized circuit boardsound generatorsound toytechnology for engagementThereminWired (magazine)Yuri Suzuki

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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