Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Materiality Of Artefacts' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 OCTOBER 2016

John Stezaker: Resonating Nostalgic Lyricism

"In an image-saturated world, British collage artist John Stezaker rather creates more with less. Cutting up yesterday photographs, subtracting pieces, and juxtaposing faces, he transforms forgotten photographs and postcards into symbolic portraiture of modernism. Stezaker's artistic interests in examining hidden relations between images have bestowed international success and recognition upon him and his collage art. Gestalten.tv had a precious opportunity to speak with the artist at his exhibition in Berlin's Capitain Petzel Gallery."

1

TAGS

2014artist • artistic interests • Ashkan Honarvar • Astrid Klein • Beni Bischof • BerlinBeth Hoeckel • Brandi Strickland • Capitain Petzel Gallery • Charles Wilkin • collagecollage art • collage artist • cross-media approach • cut-up • cutting-up • Dennis Busch • digital culture • Dominic McGill • Eva Eun-sil Han • forgotten photographs • Geoff Kim • Gestalten.tv • image-saturated world • interdisciplinary approach • James Gallagher • Jesse Draxler • John Stezaker • John Vincent Aranda • Jordan Clark • Jose Romussi • Julia Busch • juxtaposing faces • Katrien de Blauwer • Kerstin Stephan • Leigh Wells • Liam Crockard • Linder Sterling • Luis Dourado • material modes of engagementmaterial practicemateriality of artefacts • Matthieu Bourel • Max-o-matic • modernism • Nathaniel Whitcomb • Nils Karsten • Noa Giniger • postcards • Ruth van Beek • Sergei Sviatchenko • subtracting pieces • symbolic portraiture • The Age of Collage • Virginia Echeverria

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2015

Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972

"Lippard was a primary critic and theorist of Conceptual art; this book, however, provides not commentary but, instead, primary documentation. It takes the form of an annotated, thematic timeline: the chapters list books (including exhibition catalogs) published each year, followed by articles, statements, activities, and works arranged by month. Photographs illustrate selected works. The annotations are, for the most part, as documentary as possible (transcripts, excerpts of artists' statements, etc.). Lippard's editorial hand is most visible in her inclusions and exclusions; less so in her only occasional textual insertions. As such, the book performs as Lippard had envisioned: 'to expose the chaotic network of ideas in the air, in America and abroad, between 1966 and 1971' (5)."

Lucy Lippard (1973). "Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972; a cross-reference book of information on some esthetic boundaries". New York: Praeger.

1

TAGS

1973 • Adrian Piper • Agnes Denes • Alighiero Boetti • Allan Kaprow • Allen Ruppersberg • annotationsart objectArt-Language • arte povera • Athena Tacha Spear • Barry Flanagan • Barry Le Va • Bas Jan Ader • Bernar Venet • Bruce McLean • Bruce Nauman • Carl Andre • Catherine Morris • chaotic network of ideas • Charles Harrison • Christine Kozlov • chronology • Claes Oldenburg • conceptual artcontemporary art • Dan Graham • Daniel Buren • David Askevold • dematerialisation of the art object • Dennis Adrian • Dennis Oppenheim • digital art production • Donald Burgy • Douglas Huebler • earth art • Edward Ruscha • Eldritch Priest • Eleanor Antin • ephemeral art • Franz Erhard Walther • Franz Walther • Frederick Barthelme • Gerald Ferguson • Gerry Schum • Gilbert and George • Guerrilla Art Action Group • Hanne Darboven • Hans Haacke • Ian Burn • Ian Wilson • idea art • immateriality • information art • Jack Burnham • James Lee Byars • Jan Dibbets • John Baldessari • John Latham • Joseph BeuysJoseph Kosuth • Keith Arnatt • Keith Sonnier • La Monte Young • land art • Lawrence Weiner • Lee Lozano • Lucy Lippard • material concerns • materiality of artefacts • Mel Bochner • Mel Ramsden • Michael Asher • Michael Heizer • Michael Snow • Michelangelo Pistoletto • minimal art • N.E. Thing Co. • object art • On Kawara • performance art • Peter Downsbrough • Peter Hutchinson • post-conceptual • post-conceptual art • post-conceptualism • postconceptual • postconceptualism • provocative book • Rafael Ferrer • Richard Artschwager • Richard Long • Richard Serra • Robert Barry • Robert Morris • Robert Ryman • Robert SmithsonSeth SiegelaubSigmar PolkeSol LeWitt • Stanley Brouwn • Stephen Kaltenbach • Tony Smith • Victor Burgin • video art movements • Vincent Bonin • Vito Acconci • Walter de Maria • William Wegman • William Wiley • Willoughby Sharp • Wolf Vostell • Yoko Ono

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 APRIL 2014

State of Design: How Design Education Must Change

"But design faces an uncertain future. The traditional design fields create artifacts. But new societal challenges, cultural values, and technological opportunities require new skills. Design today is more human–centered and more social, more rooted in technology and science than ever before. Moreover, there is need for services and processes that do not require the great craft skills that are the primary outcome of a design education.

Although design can sometimes bring creative insight to new problems, this ability is more of an art than a science, limited to a few especially talented individuals and design firms. In order to expand beyond chance successes, design needs better tools and methods, more theory, more analytical techniques, and more understanding of how art and science, technology and people, theory and practice can commingle effectively and productively. ...

Design is still mainly taught as a craft. There are remarkably few fundamental principles, almost no science. If design is to live up to its promise it must create new, enduring curricula for design education that merge science and technology, art and business, and indeed, all the knowledge of the university. Design is an all–encompassing field that integrates together business and engineering, the social sciences and the arts. We see a tremendous opportunity for students that learn design in this integrated way. ...

For design to succeed, grow, achieve its potential, and train future leaders, we envision a new curriculum. In our vision, these new programs combine learning the art and craft of beautiful, pleasurable well–crafted design with substantive courses in the social and biological sciences, in technology, mathematics and statistics, and in the understanding of experimental methods and rigorous reasoning. Programming and mechatronics are essential skills in today's product world. Not only will this training make for better practitioners, but it will also equip future generations of designers to be better at developing the hard, rigorous theory design requires.

Design is an exciting powerful field, filled with promise. To meet the challenges of the 21st century, design and design education must change. So too must universities."

(Don Norman and Scott Klemmer, 25 March 2014)

1

TAGS

2014 • analytical techniques • analytical thinkingart and design education • behavioural sciences • call to actioncomplex phenomenacraft and materialscraft skills • creative insight • creative leaders • deductive reasoning • design academics • design and visual culturedesign artefactsdesign craftdesign curriculadesign curriculumdesign educationdesign education must changedesign facultydesign methodsdesign pedagogydesign studio educationdesign theory • design theory and practice • design thinkingdisciplinary specialisationDonald Normanexperimental methodsexperimental type design • finding and solving problems • formal design methodsfundamental principlesinductive reasoningintegrative practicesinterdisciplinary knowledge • LinkedIn Influencers (series) • material practicesmateriality of artefacts • mechatronics • people and society • people and technology • practical theory • practice and theorypractitioner wisdomquestioning traditionsScott Klemmersynthetic thinkingsystematic approachsystems thinking • technology and people • technology designtheory and practicetheory of designthinking toolsuncertain future • well-crafted design

CONTRIBUTOR

Linda Carroli
05 JULY 2013

Technologies, Texts and Affordances

"In contrast to recent sociological emphases on the social shaping of technology, this article proposes and illustrates a way of analysing the technological shaping of sociality. Drawing on the concept of affordances (Gibson 1979), the article argues for a recognition of the constraining, as well as enabling, materiality of artefacts. The argument is set in the theoretical context of one of the most recent and comprehensive statements of anti–essentialism (Grint and Woolgar 1997). The position is illustrated through a reinterpretation of some case studies used by proponents of the radical constructivist position."

(Ian Hutchby, 2001)

Ian Hutchby (2001). "Technologies, Texts and Affordances" Sociology May 2001 vol. 35 no. 2 441–456.

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.