Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Technology Pioneer' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 JULY 2016

Martin Cooper: Changing Life as We Know It with the Cell Phone

"Martin Cooper made the first mobile phone call in 1972, and communication has never been the same. Listen as Martin takes us through the invention process and shares how he predicts the technology will continue to evolve."

1

TAGS

19721973 • antenna and wireless communication • ArrayComm • AT and TBell Labs • car phone • cellphonecellular mobile networks • cellular networks • cellular phone • cellular technology • change the world • Chicago Ideas Week • communicationsdigital healthDynaTAC • Edison Talks • important technologiesinformation ageinvention • invention process • Jitterbug (cell phone) • Laura Desmond • Martin Cooper • mobile phonemobilityMotorolaNew York Citypatentspioneering technology • Star Trek Communicator • technological innovationtechnology pioneertechnology transparencytelecommunicationstelephone

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2013

ibiblio: open source model collection of collections

"Home to one of the largest 'collections of collections' on the Internet, ibiblio.org is an online public library with freely available software and information, for topics such as music, literature, art, history, science, politics, and cultural studies. ...

ibiblio.org was formed as a collaboration between the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill's MetaLab, formerly known as SunSITE, and the Center for the Public Domain in September of 2000. At UNC–Chapel Hill, ibiblio is supported by the School of Journalism and Mass Communication and the School of Information and Library Science."

TAGS

2000 • Center for the Public Domain • collection of collections • digital archive • eclectic collections catalogue • etree • free software development • freely availableibiblio • Information Technology Services • Internet2 projects • knowledge repository • Linux Documentation Project • MetaLab at Chapel Hill • online library • online public library • Open Educational Resources (OER) • open source model • open source softwareProject Gutenbergpublic access • SunSITE • technology pioneer • UNC • UNC-Chapel Hill • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hillvideo archive • video archiving • web-based services

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2013

Pioneering 1968 demo of experimental computer technologies

"On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90–minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared–screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface."

(Stanford University Libraries)

1
2

TAGS

1960s1968Augmentation Research Center at SRIBerkeley (University of California)computer historycomputer mousecomputer networksdemoDouglas Engelbart • Fall Joint Computer Conference • HCIhierarchical visualisation • human communication • human-computer interactionhyperlinkhypertexthypertext systeminformation spaces • information structures • information systems • interactive computing • keyboardlinking • multimedia demonstration • networked computer system • networked telecommunications systems • NLS • oN-Line System (NLS) • pioneeringpioneering technologySan Francisco • Stanford Research Institute • Stanford Universitytechnology pioneerUC Berkeley • video teleconferencing • videoconferencingvisionary ideaswindows metaphor • word processing • word processor • workstation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.