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Which clippings match 'Web Application' keyword pg.1 of 7
04 APRIL 2014

YouTube: new forms of community, expression, identity, interaction

"This is the third lecture in a series titled 'Digital Natives,' referring to the generation that has been raised with the computer as a natural part of their lives, especially the young people who are currently in schools and colleges today. The series seeks to understand the practices and culture of the digital natives, the cultural implications of their phenomenon and the implications for education to schools, universities and libraries.

According to Wesch, it took tens of thousands of years for writing to emerge after humans spoke their first words. It took thousands more before the printing press appeared and a few hundred again before the telegraph did. Today a new medium of communication emerges every time somebody creates a new web application. 'A Flickr here, a Twitter there, and a new way of relating to others emerges,' Wesch said. 'New types of conversation, argumentation and collaborations are realized.'

Enter YouTube, which is not just a technology. 'It's a social space built around video communication that is searchable, taggable and mashable,' Wesch said. 'It is a space where identities, values and ideas are produced, reproduced, challenged and negotiated in new ways.'"

(Library of Congress, 22 May 2008)

Fig.1 Michael Wesch, 23 June 2008, Library of Congress [http://mediatedcultures.net/]

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TAGS

2008amateur cultural production • anthenticity crisis • anthropologyappropriation • AtheneWins • authenticity • Bomb Iran (song) • Charlie Bit My Finger (2007) • Chevrolet Tahoe • Chevycollaborative productioncommunication mediumcommunity building • connection without constraint • context collapse • cultural anthenticity • demassified mediadigital ethnographydigital nativedigital texts • Dragostea Din Tei • fakesterflash frameFlickr • gaming the system • Gary Brolsma • global connectivity • Hi YouTube • home videohuman interaction • identity negotiation • identity performanceidentity production • illumistream • individualism • Kansas State University • Lawrence LessigLibrary of Congress • LisaNova • LonelyGirl15 • MadV • Marshall McLuhanmedia culture • media ecology • mediascapemediated culturememeMichael Weschnetworked individualismnetworked production • new forms of community • new forms of expression • new forms of identity • new forms of interactionnew media • new types of conversation • new ways of engaging • new ways of relating to others • Numa Numa (video) • participant observationparticipatory mediaprinting press • re-taking identity • reappropriation • Regina Spektor • remix cultureremixingRobert Putnam • seriously playful participatory media culture • sharingsocial space • Soulja Boy (video) • telegraph • user-generated content • video communication • video lecturevideo sharingvlogweb applicationwebcamYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
17 FEBRUARY 2014

University of Mary Washington's project: A Domain of One's Own

"A Domain of One's Own is a project at the University of Mary Washington managed by the Division of Teaching and Learning Technologies. Starting in fall 2013, the project allows UMW students, faculty, and staff to register their own domain name and associate it with a space on a UMW–managed Web server. In that Web space, users will have the opportunity and flexibility to design and create spaces of almost unlimited possibilities. Within the system, they may install LAMP–compatible Web applications, set up subdomains and email addresses, and install databases. In addition, users may choose to 'map' their domain (or a subdomain) to other services, such as a UMW Blogs, Google Sites, or Tumblr."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 SEPTEMBER 2013

Bootstrap: open-source front-end web design toolkit

"Bootstrap is an open–source front–end toolkit created to help designers and developers quickly and efficiently build awesome stuff online. Our goal is to provide a refined, well–documented, and extensive library of flexible design components built with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript for others to build and innovate on."

(Mark Otto, 17 January 2012, A List Apart)

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2011960 Grid SystemA List ApartBootstrap (toolkit) • collection of tools • component systemCSSdesign for the screendesign template • flexible design components • free collection • front-end developmentGitHubgrid system • Hackweek • HTML • interface components • interface design • Jacob Thornton • JavaScriptlayout • Mark Otto • open sourcepage designpage layoutresponsive design • responsive grid system • software frameworkstyle guidetechnology solutiontoolkittoolsTwittertypographyweb applicationweb designweb developmentweb layoutwebsite

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

National Archives of Australia: Archives Viewer

"Say hello to the Archives Viewer (naming things isn't really one of my strengths). Instead of rewriting my existing script I decided to create a completely new web application. Why? Mainly because it gave me a lot more flexibility. I could also make use of a variety of existing tools and frameworks like Django, Bootstrap, Isotope and FancyBox. Standing upon the code of giants, I had the whole thing up and running in a single weekend. The code is available on GitHub.

What does it do? Simply put, just feed the Archives Viewer the barcode of a digitised file in RecordSearch and it grabs the metadata and images and displays them in a variety of useful ways. It's really pretty simple, both in execution and design.

Yep, there's a wall. It's not quite as spacey and zoom–y as the CoolIris version, but perhaps that's a good thing. It's just a flat wall of page image thumbnails with a bit of lightbox–style magic thrown in. But when I say just, well... look for yourself. There's something a bit magical about seeing all the pages of a file at once, taking in their shapes and colours as well as their content. This digital wall provides a strangely powerful reminder of the physical object.

Of course you can also view the file page by page if you want. Printing is a snap – just type in any combination of pages or page ranges and hit the button. The images and metadata are assembled ready to print. No more wondering 'which file did this print out come from?'.

But perhaps the most important feature is that each page has it's own unique, persistent url. Basic stuff, but oh, so important. With a good url you can share and cite. Find something exciting? Tell the world about it! I've included your typical social media share buttons to help you along."

(Tim Sherratt, 29 August 2012)

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Archives Viewer • barcodeBootstrap (toolkit)collections • CoolIris • digital humanities • Django • FancyBox • GitHub • image viewer • Invisible Australians • Isotope • lightboxmetadataNational Archives of Australia • persistent url • RecordSearch • Tim Sherratt • web applicationwhite Australia policy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Jim Conallen: iterative web application design and development

"If you are looking for a cookie–cutter recipe to success, forget it. Developing applications is hard work and relies heavily on the skill and the ability of everyone involved. Even so, a strong process is important. Heroic efforts on the part of a development team can often bring a project to maturity; however, heroic efforts and strong process can do so repeatedly and reliably."

(Jim Conallen, 2002)

Jim Conallen (2002). "Building Web Applications with UML", (Addison–Wesley Object–Technology Series).

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2002 • application design • application developmentconceptual model • cookie-cutter • development life cyclediagramiterative design processiterative developmentiterative process • Jim Conallen • methods for design practicemodelling language • page based web applications • page-based web applications • Philippe Kruchten • requirements gathering • SDLC • software design • Software Development Life Cycle • software modellingUMLUnified Modelling Languageweb applicationweb application designweb application development

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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