Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Web' keyword pg.1 of 7
05 OCTOBER 2014

Feb. 8, 1996: We (Mostly) Celebrate 24 Hours in Cyberspace

"24 Hours in Cyberspace was the inspiration of photographer Rick Smolan, who created the 'Day in the Life' photo-essay series. Smolan used the same formula as 'Day in the Life,' recruiting 150 photojournalists to go out and chronicle a slice of everyday life, in this case as it pertained to the then-counterculturish phenomenon of the web.

The technology of the internet was not the subject: Smolan wanted (and got) pictures of how different people in different cultures were using the internet, and the effect that the medium of cyberspace was having on their lives.

The resulting work was edited and then displayed on a website. It also appeared as the cover story of that week's edition of U.S. News and World Report and, soon thereafter, as a coffee-table book."

(Wired.com, 8 February 2008)

1

2

TAGS

1996 • 24 hours • 24 Hours in Cyberspace (1996) • 8 February 1996 • a single day • book • coffee-table book • cyberspacedaily lifeday in the life • digital time capsule • glimpse • influence of the web • innocence • lives touched by the web • photographer • photographers around the world • random collection • Rick Smolan • single day on the internet • time capsule • visually capture • webWired (magazine)world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

The Computational Turn: Thinking About The Digital Humanities

"first–wave digital humanities involved the building of infrastructure in the studying of humanities texts through digital repositories, text markup, etc., whereas second–wave digital humanities expands the notional limits of the archive to include digital works, and so bring to bear the humanities' own methodological toolkits to look at 'born–digital' materials, such as electronic literature (e–lit), interactive fiction (IF), web–based artefacts, and so forth."

(David M. Berry, 2011)

Berry, D. M. (2011). "The Computational Turn: Thinking About The Digital Humanities." Culture Machine 12.

TAGS

archivearchivesborn-digital • born-digital materials • building infrastructure • database as cultural form • David Berry • digital archivedigital heritagedigital humanitiesdigital repositories • digital works • e-lit • electronic literature • first-wave digital humanities • humanitiesIFinteractive fictionmark-up • methodological toolkits • notional limits of the archive • second-wave digital humanities • structured repository • studying humanities texts • text markup • webweb archiveweb technologies • web-based artefacts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 NOVEMBER 2012

CollageMachine: An Interactive Agent of Web Recombination

"CollageMachine builds interactive collages from the Web. First you choose a direction. Then CollageMachine will take you surfing out across the Internet as far as it can reach. It builds a collage from the most interesting media it can find for you. You don't have to click through links. You rearrange the collage to refine your exploration.

CollageMachine is an agent of recombination. Aesthetics of musical composition and conceptual detournement underlie its development. The composer John Cage and Dada artists such as Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst used structured chance procedures to create aesthetic assemblages. These works create new meaning by recontextualizing found objects. Instead of functioning as a single visual work, CollageMachine embodies the process of collage making.

CollageMachine [1] deconstructs Web sites and re-presents them in collage form. The program crawls the Web, downloading sites. It breaks each page down into media elements—images and texts. Over time, these elements stream into a collage. Point, click, drag, and drop to rearrange the media. How you organize the

elements shows CollageMachine what you're interested in. You can teach it to bring media of interest to you. On the basis of your interactions, CollageMachine reasons about your interests; the evolving model informs ongoing choices of selection and placement. CollageMachine has been developed through a process of freely combining disciplines according to the principles of 'interface ecology.'"

1

TAGS

1996 • aesthetic assemblages • agent of recombination • Andruid Kerne • collagecollage art • collage form • collage making • CollageMachine (1996) • conceptual collage • conceptual detournement • create new meaning • detournement • digital collage • evolving model • foundfound object • freely combining • influential works • interactive collage • interface ecology • Internet artInternet artworkJohn CageMarcel DuchampMax Ernst • musical composition • net artnew media • New York Digital Salon • objet trouverecombinationrecombinatory practicerecontextualisationrecontextualising found objects • selection and placement • structured chance procedures • web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Cafés: hybrids involving analogue and digital, virtual and real

"Terms like 'Internet café' or 'cybercafé' bring us right back to the 90s along with phrases like 'web page' or 'digital divide', which were invented to describe new hybrids involving analog and digital, virtual and real as well as the present and near future.

It's not that these terms have grown obsolete. It's rather that these 20th–century phenomena they once described have outgrown their terminology. They were born as metaphors, but over time turned into idioms, and their analog parts were the first [to] lose their original meanings. People who did not witness the emergence of the web do not fully understand why browser content is still called a 'page'. It's has also become unclear what public internet access facilities have in common with cafés, yet we continue calling them 'internet cafés' or 'cybercafés'."

(Olia Lialina, 2012–01–10)

1

2

TAGS

1990s20th century20th century phenomenaanalogue and digitalarchaeology • Bart Plantenga • browser content • cafecafescyber archaeology • cybercafe • cybercafes • cyberculture • Danja Vasiliev • digital archaeologydigital culturedigital divideDragan Espenschiedemergence of the web • Florian Cramer • Goethe Institute • Goethe-Instituthistoryhome pagehybrid formidiomInternetinternet archaeology • internet cafe • internet cafes • inventionJODI (art collective) • Leslie Robbins • metaphor • near future • new cosmopolitanism • new hybrids • obsolescenceOlia Lialina • original meaning • outgrownpage metaphorphenomenaphenomenonPiet Zwart Institute • Piet Zwart Institute Willem de Kooning Academy Rotterdam University • public internet access • Renee Turner • Rotterdam • Rotterdam University • terminologythe pastvirtual and realwebweb pages • Wendelien van Oldenborgh • Willem de Kooning Academy • www

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Pedagogical affordances of syndication, aggregation, and mash-up of content on the Web

"As Internet and online learning become more and more incorporated into our courses, syllabi, and teaching materials, it becomes increasingly important that the impact the Web is having on changing perceptions of literacy carries over to the way we practice teaching and learning. Here we will focus on which collaborative online tools can most appropriately be applied in online and blended courses to foster reading and writing. Specifically, we will discuss some of the freely available social networking platforms and tools, their common features, and how these can help language learners find, aggregate and harvest learning objects while connecting to other people on the Web at large. We will also introduce two web publishing projects, Dekita.org and Writingmatrix, and explain how they function to facilitate this process and encourage connections."

(Barbara Dieu and Vance Stevens, 2007)

Fig.1 Michael Wesch, "The Machine is Us/ing Us (Final Version)" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLlGopyXT_g]

2). Barbara Dieu and Vance Stevens (June 2007). TESL–EJ: "Pedagogical Affordances of Syndication, Aggregation, and Mash–up of Content on the Web". TESL–EJ, Volume 11, Number 1. Available online:http://tesl–ej.org/ej41/int.html.

TAGS

2007academic journal • aggregate and harvest • aggregation • blended courses • blended learning • changing perceptions • collaborative online tools • common features • connecting to other peoplecontent on the webcourses • Dekita.org • encourage connections • English as a second language • freely available • impact of the Web • Internetlanguage learnerslearning objectsliteracymash-upMichael Weschonline learning • pedagogical affordances • reading and writing • social networking platforms • social networking tools • syllabi • syllabussyndicationteaching and learningteaching materialsteaching practicewebweb publishing • Writingmatrix

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.