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02 MAY 2011

Drama with Sustainable Waste Management: socially responsible initiatives that could result in reduced green house gas emissions

"Is Drama with Waste Management a 'Mickey Mouse' degree ... with only a few minutes research I can see a number of reasons why this combination might be useful. Sustainable waste management is a global issue, with important consequences for global warming. A number of projects use drama as a means of enhancing community involvement in these projects. One such project was part of 'Drama for Life' Africa's premier drama/theatre/performance programme. The use of drama was also a key part of a zero waste management initiative in Wakiso district, Uganda. So I personally would applaud a student who wanted to choose to combine an interest in drama (which I assume the RSC [UK Royal Society of Chemistry] are not trying to ban) with socially responsible initiatives that could result in reduced green house gas emissions."

(Chris Cooper, Saturday 13 February 2010 at 13:18)

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Africaagencycivic engagementcommunity involvement through performanceconsequences • degree combination • drama • Drama for Life • Drama with Waste Managementempowermentglobal issuesglobal warminggreenhouse gas emissionsMickey Mouse • modular degree • performance programme • reflexive modernisationRichard PikeRSCsocial responsibility • socially responsible initiatives • sustainability • Sustainable Waste Management • theatreUgandauniversity degrees • University of Northampton • Wakiso • waste • zero waste management initiative

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MAY 2011

The Story of Stuff: The Story of Electronics

"So, some time ago I was shown this video 'The Story of Stuff', a project created by Annie Leonard. She is an environmentalist who worked on international environmental health and sustainability issues, among other things like Greenpeace International, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA) and others.

This project has, so far, 2 seasons, the first with 7 short animated videos explaining some of our everyday environmental, social and economic problems and how they're related to one another. The second season is more focused on what is behind these social, environmental and economical problems and how we can act on them."

(Letícia Neves, 23 March 2011)

Fig.1 Annie Leonard (9 November 2010). 'The Story of Electronics'

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TAGS

2010activismanimated explainer videoanimated presentation • Annie Leonard • commoditycritiquedesign intelligencedesign responsibilitydisposable consumptione-wasteecological • economic issues • electronicselectronics industry • Electronics TakeBack Coalition • environmental issuesenvironmentalistethicseverydayexploitationgadget • GAIA • Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives • green design • green race to the top • Greenpeace • Greenpeace International • high-tech revolution • innovationinternational environmental health and sustainability issueslong-lasting products • manufacturing industry • miningobsolescencePeoples Republic of Chinapoison • poisoned workers • recyclable • recyclingresponsibility • responsible recycling • social changesocial issues • Story of Electronics • Story of Stuff • sustainability • toxic-free products • toxicological effectswaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2011

H2Oil: dramatic animated expository sequences

"Alberta sits over one of the largest recoverable oil patches in the world, second only to Saudi Arabia. It covers 149, 000 square kilometers, an area larger than Florida, and holds at least 175 billion barrels of recoverable crude bitumen. Canada has become the largest supplier of oil to the U.S., with over a million barrels per day coming from the oil sands. Currently 40% of all oil produced in Canada is derived from the oil sands.

The crude oil produced from the oil sands, the dirtiest oil in the world, could keep the global appetite for oil at bay for another 50 years.

But oil sands are a fundamentally different kind of oil. They take a lot of energy and a lot of water and leave a very large environmental footprint compared to all other forms of oil extraction. Because of this, the massive changes to the boreal forest and the watershed have prompted the United Nations to list this region as a global hot spot for environmental change.

In addition, oil sands projects are major emitters of greenhouse gases. They accounted for 4% of Canada's greenhouse gas emissions in 2005, making it impossible to meet obligations set out in Kyoto for emissions–reductions."

(H2Oil)

Fig.1 Dale Hayward & Sylvie Trouvé, James Braithwaite, Daniel Legace. 'La Moustache'.

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20092D2D animationAfter Effects • Alberta • animated presentationanimation • bitumen • Boreal Forest • Canadaconsumptioncrude oil • Dale Hayward • Daniel Legace • documentaryenvironmentenvironmental change • environmental footprint • ethicsexpositionFloridagreenhouse gas emissionsgreenhouse gases • H2Oil • illustrationJames Braithwaite • Kyoto • La Moustache • motion designmotion graphicsnatureobsolescenceoiloil extraction • oil sands • overburden • Saudi Arabiasequence design • Shannon Walsh • sustainabilityUnited Nationsvisual essaywastewater

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2010

NextNature: What is our concept of nature?

"Despite the global awareness of our fragile relation with nature and the countless projects initiated to restore the balance, almost no one has asked the question: What is our concept of nature? And how is our relation with nature changing? ...

This website explores our changing notion of nature. How nature has become one of the most successful products of our time, yet much of what we perceive as nature is merely a simulation: a romanticized idea of a balanced, harmonic, inherently good and threatened entity. How evolution continues nonetheless. How technology–traditionally created to protect us from the forces of nature–gives rise to a next nature, that is just as wild, cruel, unpredictable and threatening as ever. How we are playing with fire again and again. How we should be careful in doing so, yet how this is also what makes us human."

(NextNature.net)

Fig.1 Aaron Koblin (2008). 'Video capture of SMS visualization tool looking at the city of Amsterdam on New Years Eve 2007. Data from KPN Telcom.'

Fig.2 Julia Müller, Arjan Groot and Menno Wittebrood. 'Birthmarks tattoo', Identity Matters magazine.

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applied researchawareness raisingbio-ethicsclimate changeconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilityenvironmentethicsgenetic engineering • human impact • industrialinformation aesthetics • Koert van Mensvoort • manufacturingnaturalnature • NextNature • obsolescenceposthumanreflexive modernisationromanticismsocial changesustainability • technological impact • technology and nature • transformationvisualisationwaste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 OCTOBER 2009

Mainstreaming sustainable fashion

"4,5 Katharine Hamnett in a video interview explained how in the late 1980s she had been prompted to check, to make sure the company were not doing any harm. That meant looking at the entire supply chain to make sure that every phase was as good as possible. They had to apply very stringent standards from the very beginning. It started with the farmers given the millions involved in cotton agriculture who are exposed to pesticides, on a daily basis. It lead to focus on organic cotton but regrettably not using silk and considering all the packaging, dyes and printing inks. She has used certification, traceability and accountability, right the way through the supply chain but found taking complete control of this complex supply chain was the only way to enable this. She believed that the most effective to target were the CEO's, of clothing companies and fashion retailers. Mainstreaming sustainable fashion was happening because large retailers were realising that it was increasingly what consumers wanted: products that don't do damage to the environment, or that use child or sweated labour. Retailers ignored this at their peril. Sustainable clothing had to be sophisticated, glamorous and the bottom line was always economic. Sustainable clothing did not have to be more expensive. It could and should be affordable. She though that the ETI labour code should be compulsory and governments should act to have country of origin labelling for fibres."

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TAGS

art for housewives • art of recyclingbelongingblogbricolagechangecommoditycommunityconsumptioncraft • crochet • Cynthia Korzekwa • design intelligencedesign responsibility • domestic arts • dyeecologyembroideryemotive manipulationengagementenvironmentenvironmentalethicsfashion • fiber arts • folk arthomemadejewelleryjunk art • Katharine Hamnett • knittingmaking art with recycled materialsobsolescenceorganicpaperpesticideproductionprotest • reconstructed fashion • recyclerecyclingremakereusesocial changesocietysustainabilitytextile artstransformation • trashion • urban crafts • waste

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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