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03 SEPTEMBER 2014

Umberto Eco: The Virtual Imagination

"But many internet programs suggest that a story is enriched by successive contributions. … This has sometimes happened in the past without disturbing authorship. With the Commedia dell'arte, every performance was different. We cannot identify a single work due to a single author. Another example is a jazz jam session. We may believe there is a privileged performance of 'Basin Street Blues' because a recording survives. But there were as many Basin Street Blues as there were performances. ... There are books that we cannot rewrite because their function is to teach us about Necessity, and only if they are respected as they are can they provide us with such wisdom. Their repressive lesson is indispensable to reach a higher state of intellectual and moral freedom."

(Umberto Eco, 7 November 2000)

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2000authorial signatureauthoritative workauthorship • Basin Street Blues • biographybooks • books-to-be-read • booksellersbookstoresCinderella • closed universe • Commedia dellarte • comprehending languagecomputers • copying machine • e-bookelectronic literatureencyclopaediaend of booksend of print • enriched by successive contributions • every performance is different • evolving formfairy talefatefolioFranz Kafkafuture of the book • god passed over • grammatical rulesheroeshypertexthypertext fiction • hypertextual programme • hypertextual structures • Immanuel Kant • infinite possibilities • infinite texts • intellectual freedom • intellectual needs • jazz jam session • Les Miserables • library catalogue • linear narrative • linearityLittle Red Riding Hoodmanuscripts • moral freedom • Napoleon Bonapartenatural language • necessity • new forms of literacy • obsolete form • open work • Penguin edition • photocopierprint on demand • printed books • printed version • privileged performance • publishing houses • publishing modelreaderly textsreading • reading process • revisionscanningselectionshift to digital • single author • specificity of print • systems and text • tailored consumer experience • texts which can be interpreted in infinite ways • theories of interpretation • tragic beauty • tragic literature • Umberto Eco • unlimited texts • utilitarian value • Victor Hugo • War and Peace • Waterloo • William Shakespeare

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2013

Human communities depend upon a diversity of talent

"One of the real challenges is to innovate fundamentally in education. Innovation is hard because it means doing something that people don't find very easy, for the most part. It means challenging what we take for granted, things that we think are obvious. The great problem for reform or transformation is the tyranny of common sense; things that people think, 'Well, it can't be done any other way because that's the way it's done.'"

(Ken Robinson, February 2010)

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2010 • ability • Abraham Lincoln • Al Gorebatching people • broken model • common sense • conception of abilityconformitydigitised world • disenthrall • diversity of talent • dogma • education dislocates • education innovationeducation reform • education revolution • education system • Eric Clapton • fast food model • having original ideas that have value • human communities • human development • human flourishing • human resourcesindustrial model of educationintelligence • Jamie Oliver • Jeremy BenthamKen Robinson • kindergarten • learning revolutionlinearity • live for the weekend • manufacturing model • Maud Gonne • mechanical process • Natalie Merchant • natural talents • order of things • organic process • our talents • pre-digital culture • previous centuries • quiet past • rise with the occasion • single function device • standardisation • stormy present • take for granted • talentTED TalksteenagerWilliam Butler Yeats • wristwatch • Zagat

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2013

Boris Bilinsky's Constructivist-inspired Metropolis film poster

"This composition comprises the flat, featureless and strongly linear below–ground buildings of Metropolis' workers city, transformed and transposed into a mass of soaring, above–ground skyscrapers, huddled together and rather chaotically intersected by aerial roads and walkways. This interpretation of Fritz Lang's urban vision, as opposed to a mere reproduction of images from the film, makes a stunning poster. The strongly linear elements of Bilinsky's cityscape contrasts with the circular Tower of Babel and other soft–edged constructions which exist in Joh Fredersen's above–ground city for the rich and privileged. This poster has been reproduced in a number of publications dealing with European film posters, posters in general, and art movements of the 1920s. Bilinsky's work presents an artisitc bridge between Russian constructivism with is hard edges and linearity, and the soft, romantic elements so much a part of the French tradition."

Fig.1 Metropolis – L'Alliance Cinématographique Européenne présente une production UFA réalisé par Fritz Lang d'aprés le scénario de Thea von Harbou. UFA ACE', 4 Sheet poster, (240 x 320 cm) 224 x 303.5 cm / 96 x 120 inches, Farblithografie, Bédos et Cie, Paris, 1927. Signed 'Boris Bilinsky', upper right. Collection: Kunstbibliothek, Staatliche Museen / Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin. René Clémenti–Bilinsky catalogue no.1030.

(Michael Organ and René Clémenti–Bilinsky)

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1920s1927 • Boris Bilinsky • cityscapeConstructivist-inspireddesign formalismfilm posterFrench artistic traditionFritz Lang • hard edges • Joh Fredersen • linear elements • linearityMetropolis (1927) • Michael Organ • modernist aesthetics • Modernist masterpiece • poster design • Rene Clementi-Bilinsky • romantic elements • skyscraper • soft elements • Thea von HarbouTower of Babelurban visionvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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