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Which clippings match 'Structured Interviews' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JULY 2013

Qualitative Research: systematic observations of social behaviour with no preconceived hypotheses to be tested

"Qualitative research is concerned with nonstatistical methods of inquiry and analysis of social phenomena. It draws on an inductive process in which themes and categories emerge through analysis of data collected by such techniques as interviews, observations, videotapes, and case studies. Samples are usually small and are often purposively selected. Qualitative research uses detailed descriptions from the perspective of the research participants themselves as a means of examining specific issues and problems under study.

Qualitative research differs from quantitative research in that the latter is characterized by the use of large samples, standardized measures, a deductive approach, and highly structured interview instruments to collect data for hypothesis testing (Marlow, 1993). In contrast to qualitative research, in quantitative research easily quantifiable categories are typically generated before the study and statistical techniques are used to analyze the data collected. Both qualitative and quantitative research are designed to build knowledge; they can be used as complementary strategies."

(Ruth McRoy)

TAGS

ild knowledge • case studies • Christine Marlow • complementary strategies • data collection and analysisdeductive reasoning • descriptive validity reliability • detailed descriptions • enquiry and analysis • hypothesis testinginductive procedures • inductive process • large samples • nonstatistical methods • observations • problems under study • purposive selection • qualitative and quantitative research • qualitative research • quantifiable categories • quantitative researchresearch interview • research participants • Ruth McRoy • social phenomena • standardised measures • statistical techniques • structured interviews • themes and categories emerge • video (research method)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2013

How to Cite Interviews

"Interviews are a useful means of obtaining information from individuals who have been directly involved with the topic or period one is researching. Such individuals are 'primary sources' who can provide data or perspectives which may not be available from other sources. Individual interviews are normally used to establish or support particular points in a paper; a series of structured interviews may also comprise an entire 'original research component' of a paper if they form a coherent body of new information on the research topic."

(University of Tampere, 22 January 2012)

TAGS

academic citation • book interviews • broadcast interviews • chat interviews • citation • citing electronic sources • citing interviews • citing print sources • coherent body of knowledge • data collectione-mail interviewselectronic media • electronic sources • Gerard Hopkins • individual interviewsindividual perspectives • instant messaging interviews • interview (research method)interviews • live broadcast interviews • magazine interviews • MLA • Modern Language Association • new information • original research • personal interviewsprimary sourcesprint media • published interviews • radio interviews • research paperresearch sourcesresearch topicstructured interviews • telephone interviews • television interviews • University of Tamperevideo interviews • webcast interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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