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Which clippings match 'Wall Street Journal' keyword pg.1 of 1
01 MARCH 2017

Trump’s 10 Steps for Turning Lies into Half-Truths

Robert Reich, 28 February 2017, Inequality Media.

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TAGS

10-step plan • 2017baseless claimsbe vigilant • believing lies to be true • blogosphereconfused and disorientedconfusion tacticscontradictory narrativescontradictory perspectives • creating controversy • deceitfulnessdeception • deliberate intention to mislead • destabilised perception • discrediting experts • dishonest • dishonesty • disputed fact • Donald Trumpexpert informationexpert knowledgefake news • fallacious belief • false claimsfalse statementsfalsehood • falsehoods • falsify realityfound to be true by manygaslighting • Gerard Baker • gullibility • Inequality Media • know the truth • lies • lying • mainstream media • media reports • mental tricks • mincing words • misleading messagemistruths • near truths • partisan divide • perceptions of realitypolitical control • political tactics • post-truth • post-truth politicspost-truth world • president • pro-Trump mediapublic thought • questioning expert knowledge • report lies as lies • Republican • right-wing blogosphere • Robert Reich • spread the truth • tweets • US president • Wall Street Journalwhat is really happening

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

Austin Kleon: Steal Like An Artist

"Austin Kleon's talk 'Steal Like An Artist' is a creative manifesto based on 10 things he wish he'd heard when he was starting out. Austin is a writer and artist. He's the author of Newspaper Blackout, a best–selling book of poetry made by redacting newspaper articles with a permanent marker. Austin's talk was delivered as part of the TEDxKC presentation of TEDxChange. Austin's work (including his new book) 'Steal Like An Artist' has been featured on NPR's Morning Edition, PBS Newshour, and in The Wall Street Journal. He speaks about creativity, visual thinking, and being an artist online for organizations such as SXSW and The Economist."

(TEDx Talk, 2012, Kansas City)

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2012 • Austin Kleon • authorshipBrion Gysin • Caleb Whitefoord • citation as a form of persuasionclipping • creative lineage • creative manifesto • creativitycreditingcultural productioncut-up techniqueDavid Bowieeditingephemeralerasure • genealogy of ideas • history of ideasIgor Stravinsky • marker pen • mash-up • newspaper blackout • newspaper clipping • nothing is originalNPRobliteratePablo PicassoPBS • permanent marker • redactedredactionremix culturesteal from anywhere • SXSW • TED Talks • TEDxChange • TEDxKC • The Economist • Tom Phillips • Tristan Tzaravisual thinkingWall Street Journal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2010

Most video on the web is published using the H.264 format

"Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access 'the full web' because 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don't say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web's video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others."

(Steve Jobs, April 2010)

Fig.1 video of iPhone mugging attempt on Steven Levy's phone.

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2010ABCAdobe FlashAdobe SystemsAppleCBSCNNCODECcontentconvergence • ESPN • FacebookFox NewsH.264HTML5 • iPads • iPhoneiPodmobile device • MSNBC • National Geographic Magazine • NetflixNew York TimesNPRPeople magazinepublishing • Sports Illustrated • Steve JobsTime Magazinevideovideo on the webVimeoWall Street JournalYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JUNE 2009

Prometeus: the future of the convergence inclination?

"Man is God. He is everywhere, he is anybody, he knows everything. This is the Prometeus new world. All started with the Media Revolution, with Internet, at the end of the last century. Everything related to the old media vanished: Gutenberg, the copyright, the radio, the television, the publicity. The old world reacts: more restrictions for the copyright, new laws against non authorized copies. Napster, the music peer to peer company is sued. At the same time, free internet radio appears; TIVO, the internet television, allows to avoid publicity; the Wall Street Journal goes on line; Google launches Google news. Millions of people read daily the biggest on line newspaper. Ohmynews written by thousands of journalists; Flickr becomes the biggest repository in the history of photos, YouTube for movies. The power of the masses. A new figure emerges: the prosumer, a producer and a consumer of information. Anyone can be a prosumer. The news channels become available on Internet. The blogs become more influential than the old media. The newspapers are released for free. Wikipedia is the most complete encyclopedia ever. In 2007 Life magazine closes. The NYT sells its television and declares that the future is digital. BBC follows. In the main cities of the world people are connected for free. At the corners of the streets totems print pages from blogs and digital magazines. The virtual worlds are common places on the Internet for millions of people. A person can have multiple on line identities. Second Life launches the vocal avatar. The old media fight back. A tax is added on any screen; newspapers, radios and televisions are financed by the State; illegal download from the web is punished with years of jail. Around 2011 the tipping point is reached: the publicity investments are done on the Net. The electronic paper is a mass product: anyone can read anything on plastic paper. In 2015 newspapers and broadcasting television disappear, digital terrestrial is abandoned, the radio goes on the Internet. The media arena is less and less populated. Only the Tyrannosaurus Rex survives. The Net includes and unifies all the content. Google buys Microsoft. Amazon buys Yahoo! and become the world universal content leaders with BBC, CNN and CCTV. The concept of static information – books, articles, images – changes and is transformed into knowledge flow. The publicity is chosen by the content creators, by the authors and becomes information, comparison, experience. In 2020 Lawrence Lessig, the author of 'Free Culture', is the new US Secretary of Justice and declares the copyright illegal. Devices that replicate the five senses are available in the virtual worlds. The reality could be replicated in Second Life. Any one has an Agav (agent–avatar) that finds information, people, places in the virtual worlds. In 2022 Google launches Prometeus, the Agav standard interface. Amazon creates Place, a company that replicates reality. You can be on Mars, at the battle of Waterloo, at the Super Bowl as a person. It's real. In 2027 Second Life evolves into Spirit. People become who they want. And share the memory. The experiences. The feelings. Memory selling becomes a normal trading. In 2050 Prometeus buys Place and Spirit. Virtual life is the biggest market on the planet. Prometeus finances all the space missions to find new worlds for its customers: the terrestrial avatar. Experience is the new reality."
(Casaleggio Associati)

[Despite the clear problems with such techno–utopian predictions this clip highlights the significance of our current convergence inclination.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JUNE 2005

Weblogs: Promoting Shared Business Context

"...think about the value of the Wall Street Journal to business leaders. The value it provides is context – the Journal allows readers to see themselves in the context of the financial world each day, which enables more informed decision making. With this in mind, think about your company as a microcosm of the financial world. Can your employees see themselves in the context of the whole company? Would more informed decisions be made if employees and leaders had access to internal news sources? Weblogs serve this need. By making internal websites simple to update, weblogs allow individuals and teams to maintain online journals that chronicle projects inside the company. These professional journals make it easy to produce and access internal news, providing context to the company – context that can profoundly affect decision making. In this way, weblogs allow employees and leaders to make more informed decisions through increasing their awareness of internal news and events."
(Lee LeFever, 2004/06/21 11:18 PM)

[his pitch argues a case for using Weblogs in a corporate setting. One could argue that their use in this context might provide a challenge to accepted corporate Intranet practices. Instead of such systems being provided as mechanisms for publishing (authorised) corporate 'news' they might instead provide a means for employees to 'feedback' and share their understandings with their peers. In this way weblogs would not only provide context but they could also help to promote corporate loyalty and team–building.]

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