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Which clippings match 'Breaking The Fourth Wall' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 OCTOBER 2013

Subservient hunter hawks Tipp-Ex white-out

"Leave it to a brand of ink–correction fluid to create the most entertaining YouTube campaign since the Old Spice response videos. The clip below, for Tipp–Ex, with a hunter who encounters a bear at his campsite, sets in motion a whole interactive choose–your–own–adventure game where you decide what the hunter should do to the bear by typing directions into a field above the video. (The hunter uses Tipp–Ex to erase the word "shoots" and asks you for replacements.) It's basically Subservient Chicken all over again, but with a YouTube spin."

(Tim Nudd, 2 September 2010, Adweek)

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TAGS

2010adAdweekbearbreaking the fourth wall • Buzzman (agency) • campsite • choose your own adventure • correction fluid • deus ex machina • erase • erasuregrizzly bear • hunter • interactive advertisinginteractive narrativeinteractive YouTube video • Old Spice • Subservient Chicken (Burger King) • Tipp-Ex • white-out • YouTube campaign

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
21 JUNE 2013

Photobombing: foregrounding the constructed reality of photographic scenes

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breaking the fourth wallconstructed reality • diminish • distracting attentiondistracting behaviourdistraction • divert attention • extradiegeticfocus • foregrounding constructedness • grab our attentionhuman behaviourhumourintertextuality • non-diegetic • out of the spotlight • photobomb • photobombing • photographic portraitplayfulnessprankreflexive foregroundingreflexivitysnapshotssurprise • the space of the photograph • trivialisationundermine • upstage • upstagingworld of the image

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 NOVEMBER 2012

Psychical Distance: characters and situations in drama are unreal

"One of the best known examples is to be found in our attitude towards the events and characters of the drama; they appeal to us like persons and incidents of normal experience, except that that side of their appeal, which would usually affect us in a directly personal manner, is held in abeyance. This difference, so well known as to be almost trivial, is generally explained by reference to the knowledge that the characters and situations are 'unreal,' imaginary. In this sense Witasek, oeprating with Meinong's theory of Annahem, has described the emotions involved in witnessing a drama as Scheingefuhle, a term which has so frequently been misunderstood in discussions of his theories. But, as a matter of fact, the 'assumption' upon which the imaginative emotional reaction is based is not necessarily the condition, but often the consequence, of distance; that is to say, the converse of the reason usually stated would then be true: viz. That distance, by changing our relation to the characters, renders them seemingly fictitious, not that the fictitiousness of the characters alters our feelings toward them. It is, of course, to be granted that the actual and admitted unreality of the dramatic action reinforces the effect of Distance. But surely the proverbial unsophisticated yokel whose chivalrous interference in the play on behalf of the hapless heroine can only be prevented by impressing upon him that 'they are only pretending,' is not the ideal type of theatrical audience. The proof of the seeming paradox that it is Distance which primarily gives to dramatic action the appearance of unreliability and not vice versa, is the observation that the same filtration of our sentiments and the same seeming 'unreality' of actual men and things occur, when at times, by a sudden change of inward perspective, we are overcome by the feeling that 'all the world's a stage.'"

(Edward Bullough, 1912)

Edward Bullough (1912). "Psychical Distance" British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 5, pp. 87–117 (excerpt cited by Julie Van Camp, 22 November 2006).

Fig.1 Patricia Piccinini/Drome Pty Ltd. (2010) [http://leecasey.carbonmade.com/projects/2594595#9]

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1912aesthetics • Alexius Meinong • all the worlds a stage • Annahem • appeal • appearance of unreliability • audiencebelievabilitybreaking the fourth wallchanging our relationcharactersdirect experience • distance • distanced viewpointdrama • dramatic action • dramatic space • Edward Bullough • emotionemotional immersionemotional involvementempathyfeelings • fictitious • fictitiousnessheld in abeyanceimaginary • imaginative emotional reaction • normal experience • only pretending • our sentiments • pathospersonalpropinquitypsychical distancepsychological closeness • psychological proximity • Scheingefuhle • Stephan Witasek • suspension of disbelief • theatrical audience • unreal • unreal characters • unreal situations • unreality • verisimilitude • witnessing • yoke

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 NOVEMBER 2012

Louvre chase scene with Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Elmer Fudd

Extract from "Looney Tunes: Back in Action" (2003)

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2003 • A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (1884) • art gallerybreaking the fourth wall • Bugs Bunny • cartoon characterschase sceneDaffy DuckEdvard Munch • Elmer Fudd • extradiegeticGeorges Seurat • Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec • humourintertextuality • Jerry Goldsmith • Looney TunesLouvremetatheatricality • moulin rouge • Moulin Rouge La Goulue (1891) • paint by numbers • paintingspointillismremediationSalvador Dalisurrealist style • The Persistence of Memory (1931) • The Scream (1893)world of the image

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 FEBRUARY 2009

Duck Amuck: classic cartoon meta-subject

"There's an authorial consciousness and meta narrative that's noticeably at play in many of the Bugs Bunny cartoons. In fact, the opening of this film started out with the well–known ending, "That's All Folks!" which was then corrected by Bugs to say, "That's Not All Folks!"––a phrase that included copyediting marks. So we know from the start that the narrative is all a game, that beginnings and endings (or any traditional narrative arc) shouldn't be taken seriously, and that Bugs will always toy with our expectations.

One episode stood out spectacularly. In Duck Amuck (created in 1953), Daffy Duck is exquisitely tortured by his creator. In the course of the film the animator messes with and changes the scenery, interchanges props, replaces the soundtrack, mutes Daffy, and even erases and physically alters Daffy himself. For example, as Daffy strolls with a ukulele, singing a lazy, tropical song, he's tossed into a variety of climates, ending up in the snow (you can almost hear the animator laughing––at Daffy and in celebration of his artistic, cruel freedom). Daffy keeps trying to live––and entertain––but he can't maintain any constancy or control of his surroundings, or even his body."
(Lit Matters , 15 December 2007)

[Duck Amuck can be interpreted as a (playful) allegory to Christian mythology where Daffy Duck represents humanity and Bugs Bunny (his creator) represents 'God'.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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