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Which clippings match 'Jorge Luis Borges' keyword pg.1 of 1
16 FEBRUARY 2018

From cause to relation

"For the occidental tradition, the idea of God is intimately related to the idea of causality. That means that for any chain of facts it is reasonable to postulate an absolute beginning, which can be called 'God'. Nevertheless, if instead of explaining the universe through the principle of causality we decide to refer to the pure idea of a 'form' -as one can speak of 'rhetorical (or mathematical) forms'-, the chain ceases to be factual and becomes structural and iterative, like a grammar, and there is no longer any way to avoid the possibility of denying a 'real' beginning. The entities in the world become figures in a diagram, the ontological 'history' becomes a rhetorical 'texture' (trama), and God (written with upper initial) may always 'be moved' by some other 'god' (with lower initial), and so on, following a never ending texture 'of dust, and time, and dream and agonies'".

(Ivan Almeida, Cristina Parodi, 1996)

Almeida, I. and C. Parodi (1996). "Borges and the Ontology of Tropes." Variaciones Borges(2).

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TAGS

1996 • absolute beginning • bringing into relationcausality • chain of facts • Cristina Parodi • entities • explaining the universe • factuality • figures in a diagram • formgodhistory of ideasiterative • Ivan Almeida • Jorge Luis Borges • network model of relations • network morphology • occidental • ontological history • principle of causality • real beginning • relational model • relational view • rhetorical forms • rhetorical texture • structural logic • trama • Variaciones Borges

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 APRIL 2005

Parole: dictionary of the contemporary city

"parole is a dynamic dictionary of the contemporary city, or at least this was the intention when it was launched in June 2000 in occasion of the 7th International Exhibition of Architecture at the Biennale in Venice, Italy.

Since then parole has become a vast, loose, heterogeneous website, probably less easily defined with such a stringent term as 'dictionary'.

Currently about 900 words, related to the transformation of the urban landscape, are organised in a hypermedia database, along with more than 1000 links to & from the Internet.

Images, texts, quotations, comments, fragments of text, links to external websites, videos, sounds, webcams are some of the scattered elements which constitute its fragmented mosaic.

parole acts as an open platform for information, discussion, archive, gathering of data, it is a place where much of the material included is directly provided by its users. As in a type of 'Borgesian' dream it establishes a permanently fluid and unstable mapping of the actual urban condition throughout the world, looking at the variations and alterations in language and in the discourse of several different disciplines. Neologisms, slang terms, theories, utopic projects, nicknames attributed to specific sites, urbanism, architecture, anthropology, contemporary art are some of the multiple material included in parole.

As its nature is permanently unstable and deprived of any hierarchy, parole is subject to shifts and alterations towards directions which are actually unpredictable.

In occasion of its different presentations within localised conditions, such as a museum or a gallery space, we have tried to accomplish a certain degree of interaction with the context, in order to allow the project to present a direct vision of the condition of the contemporary city in its permanent state of change."

(Gruppo A12, Udo Noll and Peter Scupelli)

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TAGS

2000anthropologyarchitecture • architecture biennale • categorisationcityclassificationdictionaryhypertextItalyJorge Luis Borgeslangue and paroleneologism • nicknames • orderingparoleslangtaxonomythesaurusurbanismutopia • Venice
10 APRIL 2005

The index becomes more important than the territory it maps

"Jorge Luis Borges's story about a map which was equal in size to the territory it represented became re–written as the story about indexes and the data they index. But now the map has become larger than the territory. Sometimes, much larger. Porno Web sites exposed the logic of the Web to its extreme by constantly re–using the same photographs from other porno Web sites. Only rare sites featured the original content. On any given date, the same few dozen images would appear on thousands of sites. Thus, the same data would give rise to more indexes than the number of data elements themselves."

(Lev Manovich 2000, p.225)

Manovich, Lev (2001). Chapter 5: The Forms. "The Language of the New Media", MIT Press.

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11 JUNE 2004

On Exactitude in Science: a map the size of the territory it represents

"On Exactitude in Science . . . In that Empire, the Art of Cartography attained such Perfection that the map of a single Province occupied the entirety of a City, and the map of the Empire, the entirety of a Province. In time, those Unconscionable Maps no longer satisfied, and the Cartographers Guilds struck a Map of the Empire whose size was that of the Empire, and which coincided point for point with it. The following Generations, who were not so fond of the Study of Cartography as their Forebears had been, saw that that vast Map was Useless, and not without some Pitilessness was it, that they delivered it up to the Inclemencies of Sun and Winters. In the Deserts of the West, still today, there are Tattered Ruins of that Map, inhabited by Animals and Beggars; in all the Land there is no other Relic of the Disciplines of Geography.

Suarez Miranda,Viajes de varones prudentes, Libro IV,Cap. XLV, Lerida, 1658"
(Jorge Luis Borges, 1999)

Jorge Luis Borges, Collected Fictions, Translated by Andrew Hurley Copyright Penguin 1999

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TAGS

19461:12D representationsabsurditycartographycity • Del rigor en la ciencia (story) • empirefictional mapgeographyJorge Luis BorgesmapOn Exactitude in Science (1946)perfection • province • territory
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