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Which clippings match 'Visual Codes' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 OCTOBER 2017

Michael Glassco: Contested images: the politics and poetics of appropriation

"The dissertation traces the tactics of appropriation of Barbara Kruger, The Billboard Liberation Front and Shepard Fairey as exemplars of transgression and commodification within the changing commercial conditions of neo-liberalism. Their works, tactics and strategies are emphasized as points of insight into the practices and conditions of subversion as well as the limits of hegemonic containment that reproduces the political and economic structure within which they operated. The dissertation furthers and contributes to the theoretical and methodology of critical cultural studies as it emphasizes the role of the economy and ideology in reproducing the prevailing hegemonic order. Critical cultural studies hinges on the concepts of hegemony as lived discursive and ideological struggles over meaning and communication resources within historically specific and socially structured contexts. This framework emphasizes the poetics of appropriation - the use, meaning and spaces of articulation of visual representations with the politics - the socio-economic and discursive conditions that reproduce the dominant social order."

(Michael Glassco, 2012, University of Iowa)

TAGS

2012activismAdbustersadvertising hijacking • advertising imagery • advertising messages • appropriated images • appropriation activists • appropriation artists • appropriation practices • appropriation tactics • Barbara Kruger • Billboard Liberation Front • bricoleur • Buy Nothing Day • co-optioncommodificationconstructed identitiesconsumption spectaclecritical cultural hijacking • critical cultural studies • critique in public spaces • critique power • culture jammingdiscursive struggles • fauxvertising • graphic agitator • guerrilla artGuerrilla Girlsguerrilla tactics • hegemonic containment • hegemony • ideological struggle • ideological systems • ideological warfare • images of appropriation • institutionalised art • Jenny Holzer • manufacturing identity • media hijacking • Michael Glassco • neoliberalismparticipatory engagement • pastiche of visual codes • PhD thesis • poetics of appropriation • political protest • prevailing hegemonic order • privatisation of culture • public space • rebellious bricoleur • revolutionary subjects • Robbie Conal • Rosemary Coombe • Shepard Fairey • sublimating desire • subversionsubvertisements • subvertising • systematic asymmetries of power • tactic of dissent • tactical strikes • tactics of appropriation • tactics of guerrilla semiotics • The Billboard Liberation Front • transgression • TV Turn off Week • un-commercials • unequal access to cultural resources • University of Iowavisual codesvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JULY 2013

The key image of the present day is the man in the motor car

"In all of these experiments, aborted works, happenings, events, the motif of the car crash is crucial. Ballard sought to understand the role that automobile styling, and mass consumerism, plays in our lives. His sights were set on what he saw as the built–in death drive that technology embodies, the effacing of identity, the shutting off of our neurological systems. Our willingness to submit to the amniotic bliss of the technological womb. Of course, today we know where all this would eventually beach: his 1973 masterpiece, Crash. But in 1971 Ballard was still pushing the farthest limits of his obsession, refining riffs and routines, expanding the parameters of the car crash as far as popular culture would allow. Crucially this was far beyond the stuffy confines of 'literature', which Ballard has never had much time for, and into visual art and film: the realm of the popular imaginary."

(Simon Sellars, 10 August 2007, Ballardian)

Fig.1 dir. Harley Cokeliss, "Towards Crash!", 1971. 16 mm Eastmancolor transferred to video, sound, 17:34 min. Courtesy the artist. © BBC TV 1971.

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TAGS

16mm197120th centuryabsurd condition of humanityBBC TVBBC2bodily formbodybody experiencecarcar crash • car wash • collisionconsumerismcrashcrash test • crash test dummy • death • Eastmancolor • experimental filmGabrielle Drake • Harley Cokeliss • Harley Cokliss • human interpretation • J G Ballard • James Mossman • Kodak Eastmanmachine aestheticmeaninglessness of life • motorcar • motoristprotection • romancing technology • romanticismsex and machines • styling • suffering and inevitable deathtechnological shaping of sociality • technological system • technoromanticism • The Atrocity Exhibition (1970) • Towards Crash (1971) • traumavisual codes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JUNE 2013

The Visual Telling of Stories: a collection of advertising images, magazine spreads and book illustrations

"The website of The Visual Telling of Stories aspires to being a Visual Lexicon, dedicated to the primacy of the Visual Proposition. Above all it tries to create an overall consistency of structure and environment, as if it was all taking place in one characteristic landscape through which you are allowed to wander. The main delight and challenge is the invention of non–linear means of navigation through spaces of knowledge with a created balance of reference and discovery."

(Chris Mullen)

Fig.1 Emile Allais, Roger Frison–Roche, et al. (1947). How to Ski by the French Method: Emile Allais, Technic. Preface by Frison–Roche. Photos and Layout by Pierre Boucher. Translated from the French by Agustin R. Edwards, Éditions Flèche [http://www.fulltable.com/vts/aoi/b/boucher/bc.htm].

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TAGS

advertising imagesadvertising posters • Agustin Edwards • American dreambook designbook illustration • Chris Mullen • collected examples • cultural codescultural narrativesdesign and visual culture • Emile Allais • ephemeragraphic representationimage collectionlogocentricmagazine layoutmaterial culturemiscellaneousnewspaperspersonal cataloguepersonal collections • pictures tell stories • propaganda • Roger Frison-Roche • vintage advertisingvisual codesvisual communicationvisual culturevisual ephemera • visual lexicon • visual taxonomy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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