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Which clippings match 'Visual Language' keyword pg.1 of 11
05 JUNE 2015

Emoticons as computer-mediated non-verbal communication

"The term 'emoticons'—short for 'emotion icons'—refers to graphic signs, such as the smiley face, that often accompany computer-mediated textual communication. They are most often characterized as iconic indicators of emotion, conveyed through a communication channel that is parallel to the linguistic one. In this article, it is argued that this conception of emoticons fails to account for some of their important uses. We present a brief outline of speech act theory and use it to provide a complementary account of emoticons, according to which they also function as indicators of illocutionary force. More broadly, we identify and illustrate three ways in which emoticons function: 1) as emotion indicators, mapped directly onto facial expression; 2) as indicators of non-emotional meanings, mapped conventionally onto facial expressions, and 3) as illocutionary force indicators that do not map conventionally onto a facial expression. In concluding, we draw parallels between emoticons and utterance-final punctuation marks, and show how our discussion of emoticons bears upon the broader question of the bounds between linguistic and non-linguistic communication."

(Eli Dresner and Susan C. Herring, 2010)

Dresner, E., & Herring, S. C. (2010). "Functions of the non-verbal in CMC: Emoticons and illocutionary force". Communication Theory, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 249-268.

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2010computer-mediated communication (CMC) • computer-mediated textual communication • discourse analysis • Eli Dresner • emoticons • emotion icon • emotion indicators • facial expressionsgraphic communication • graphic signs • hieroglyphs • iconic indicators of emotion • illocutionary act • illocutionary force • illocutionary force indicator • illustration to visually communicate informationimages replace text • linguistic communication • linguistics • non-emotional meanings • non-linguistic communication • non-verbal communicationpictogrampictorial languagepicture language • smiley face • social informatics • speech act theory • Susan Herring • textual computer-mediated communication (CMC) • utterance-final punctuation marks • visual languagevisual literacyvisual representation graphically

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 SEPTEMBER 2014

Jean-Luc Godard's Critical Appropriation of Graphic Design

"The films of Jean–Luc Godard have been written about perhaps more than any other cinematic works, often through the lens of cultural theory, but not nearly enough attention has been paid to the role of designed objects in his films. Collages of art, literature, language, objects, and words, Godard's films have an instant, impactful, graphic quality, but are far from simple pop artifacts. The thesis this presentation derives from, 'Objects to be Read, Words to be Seen: Design and Visual Language in the Films of Jean–Luc Godard 1959–1967,' explores and interprets the role of visual language within the films–title sequences, intertitles, handwritten utterances, and printed matter in the form of newspapers, magazines, and posters.

By examining le graphisme within the cultural context of Paris during the 1960s, this thesis seeks to amplify the significance of graphic design in Godard's first fifteen films, beginning with 1960's À Bout de Souffle (Breathless) and ending with 1967's Weekend. While Godard was not a practicing graphic designer in the traditional sense, he was an amateur de design, an autodidact whose obsession with designed objects, graphic language and print media resulted in the most iconic body of work in 1960s France."

(Laura Forde, 30 April 2010)

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1960s • A Bout de Souffle (1959) • amateur de design • appropriation • autodidact • Breathless (1959) • cinematic visual language • cinematic works • critical appropriationcultural context • cultural theory • design and visual language • design sense • designed objects • designed thingsend titlesFrancegraphic design • graphic language • graphic quality • hand lettering • handwritten utterances • iconic body of work • intertitlesJean-Luc Godard • Laura Forde • le graphisme • magazinesnewspapersParisPierrot le Fou (1965)postersprint media • printed matter • title sequencetitle stillsTwo Or Three Things I Know About Hertypographyvideo lecturevisual languagevisual sensibilityWeekend

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JUNE 2013

Lady in the Lake: the dramatic effect of subjective point of view

"Robert Montgomery drehte 'Lady in the Lake' 1947 nach einem Plot, das Raymond Chandlers gleichnamigen Roman adaptierte. In diesem Spielfilm verfolgen Beobachter die Handlung aus der Perspektive des Detektivs Philip Marlowe: Personen, die sich Marlowe zuwenden und mit ihm sprechen, wenden sich der Kamera zu. Das wirkt in Filmvorführungen im Kino, als wenden sie sich in den Projektionsraum und sprechen die Zuschauer an. Der Beobachter wird zugleich ins Bildgeschehen durch die szenische Konstellation hineingezogen (Immersion), wie auf die Grenze zwischen Filmraum und Projektionsraum verwiesen, da er im Filmraum nicht selbst handeln kann, sich aber wie Marlowe im Bildraum verortet. Marlowe bleibt ein anderer, meist unsichtbarer Körper, der aber sieht und den Anschluss des Beobachters an seine Wahrnehmung einfordert: Die Kamera verleiht ihren Beobachtern einen szenischen Kontext, in den Kinozuschauer sich versetzen können. Sie stossen dabei sowohl auf Vorgaben (wie Marlowe spricht) wie auf Fehlstellen (das Sichtbare von Marlowes Auftreten, wenn er nicht in einen Spiegel schaut)."

(Thomas Dreher, IASLonline)

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1947 • Audrey Totter • black and whitecamera anglecinematic conventionscinematic language • cinematic space • crime fictiondetective storyfilm languagefilm noirfirst-person point of viewformal conceit • hardboiled • hardboiled detective • IASLonline • immersionLady in the Lake (1947)perspective view • Philip Marlowe • point of viewPOV • Raymond Chandler • Robert Montgomery • screen space • subjective shot • subjective viewpoint • visual conceit • visual depictionvisual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2012

Visual Rhetoric

"The very existence of a visual language gives rise to the concept of visual rhetoric. As its spoken counterpart does, visual rhetoric has its own figures and its own way of using them."

(Juan C. Dürsteler, 19/05/2003)

Erik Johansson "Go Your Own Road", [http://erikjohanssonphoto.com/]

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Absolut Vodka • advertising imagesGenevaGiuseppe Arcimboldo • mascot • metonymypersonification • Southwestern Electric Corporation • VertumnaliaVertumnusvisual languagevisual punvisual rhetoric • Willie Wiredhand

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JULY 2012

Fahrenheit 451: illustrations replace text in newspapers

Montag (Oskar Werner) 'reads' his illustrated newspaper in bed. The scene is from François Truffaut's classic film treatment of Ray Bradbury's 1953 novel about a dystopian world where written books have been outlawed.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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