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Which clippings match 'Visual Communication' keyword pg.2 of 39
06 FEBRUARY 2014

The Twelve Basic Principles of Animation

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TAGS

12 principles of animation • 1930sanimation • animation principles • anticipationappeal • Arcs • character animation • character appeal • computer animationdesign principlesdesign rules • emotional timing • Exaggeration • Follow through and overlapping action • Frank Thomas • hand-drawn animation • laws of physics • meaningfull transitions • motion graphics • Ollie Johnston • perceptual organisation • physical animation • pictorial systems • realistic animation • Secondary action • Slow in and slow out • Solid drawing • squash and stretch • staging • Straight ahead action and pose to pose • Timing • Twelve Basic Principles of Animation • visual communicationvisual ruleWalt Disney Studios

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
02 FEBRUARY 2014

Design conventions for magazine page layout design

"Each magazine page consists of several crucial elements. Image below is your guide and I will explain each of those elements in brief. Since these elements are important, you should have deeper understanding on how to work with them."

(Nikola Mileta, 26 March 2013, Magazine Designing)

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Adobe InDesignbleed (typography) • body copy • body text • box copy • byline • column width • content panel • copy editor • credits • deck (magazine design) • design conventions • design element • design for magazines • design for printdesign vocabulary • feature spread • foliographic design • gutter (printing) • headline • headline size • image bleed • image caption • intro • introduction • kicker (magazine design) • layout designmagazine designmagazine layoutmagazine spread • multi page spread • page columns • page design • page elements • page layout design • page margins • page navigation • page number • page size • page template • pagesettingprint design • publication date • publication design • publication logo • pull quote • pull-out • readability • running head • sans-serif type • sans-serif typeface • section head • section title • serif • serif type • subhead • subheading • subheads • text blocks • textual element • type element • type size • type style • visual communication • written text

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2014

Interactive billboards that drop angels on your head

"There you are in the middle of the city, traffic all around, planes buzzing above and you notice a little boy on a giant screen pointing up. 'Look,' says the boy. And you look, and the on–screen boy is pointing at an actual plane flying in the sky. He knows its flight number, its destination. This is no joke. That is flight BA475 from Barcelona! He tracks its path with his little hand, and then, when the plane is gone, he dashes off. This is a British Airways display ad in London's Piccadilly Circus, and it's using to identify actual planes in the actual sky.

Digital billboards are stepping up their game. They are becoming . There's another stunning example at Euston Station (also in London) that shows a man furiously screaming at a woman who is clearly frightened. But you can help. If you have a cellphone, you can yank the man clear across the station, dragging him from screen to screen to screen until he's way on the other side of the terminal.

I've got one more. This time it's a fantasy experience available to anyone who steps into a marked spot in the middle of Victoria Station. (London's a happening place for billboard experimentation.) Once you're there, a holographic angel drops down from heaven and lands beside you. You can't see her in real space, but you and she are plainly visible on a screen that everybody in the station can see, and you are free to interact anyway you please."

(Robert Krulwich, 04 January 2014, NPR)

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TAGS

2014advertising in public spacesaeroplaneangelawareness raisingbillboardboy • British Airways • cellphonecreative advertising • cute girl • digital billboardsdigital displaysdigital screens • display ad • domestic violence • e-motion screens • Euston Station • fantasy experience • flight number • flying • frighten • furious • get involvedholograph • interactive billboard • interactive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • intervene • JCDecaux • London Victoria • Lynx Excite • manmobile phone • National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) • NPROgilvy Group UK • Piccadilly Circus • pointing • public spacescream • screen to screen • sky • surveillance technology • train stationuser experience design (UX) • Victoria Station • visual communicationwoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2013

d.school: Design Thinking Bootcamp

"The Bootcamp Bootleg is an overview of some of our most–used tools. The guide was originally intended for recent graduates of our Bootcamp: Adventures in Design Thinking class. But we've heard from folks who've never been to the d.school that have used it to create their own introductory experience to design thinking. The Bootcamp Bootleg is more of a cook book than a text book, and more of a constant work–in–progress than a polished and permanent piece. This resource is free for you to use and share – and we hope you do."

(d.school at Stanford University)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
21 OCTOBER 2013

3 Design Layouts: Gutenberg Diagram, Z-Pattern, and F-Pattern

"Several layout patterns are often recommended to take advantage of how people scan or read through a design. 3 of the more common are the Gutenberg diagram, the z–pattern layout, and the f–pattern layout. ... While patterns like the Gutenberg diagram, the z–pattern, and the f–pattern layout suggest that there is a natural path the eye will take through a design, the reality is they refer only to designs dominated by large blocks of text with little to no hierarchy. ... Instead of trying to force your design into one of the patterns described, decide instead what information you want the viewer to see and through a series of focal points and design flow lead their eyes through your hierarchy of information. That's really the only pattern you need to use."

(Steven Bradley, 7 February 2011)

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design for the screen • F-layout design • F-pattern • Gutenberg diagram • layoutlayout designlayout patternslayoutspage layoutpage layout designpage layout patternUIviewing experiencevisual communicationvisual screen designweb designweb layoutweb page layoutsweb pages • Z-layout design • Z-pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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