Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Video Game' keyword pg.1 of 9
19 JANUARY 2016

Love Punks: online game created by Australian Indigenous kids

"The Love Punks online game was created by a gang of 9,10 and 11 year old Love Punks from Roebourne in WA. For the last 8 months the Love Punks have been sweating it out, in 40 degree heat, on computers creating stop motion animations of themselves and friends in photoshop and flash."

(26 April 2012)

1
2

TAGS

2012 • 9-11 year olds • Aboriginal Australian kids • Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal kids • Adobe Flash • bearded dragon • Big hART • Burrup Peninsula • childhood imagination • Chynna Campbell • comic bookcommunity participatory projectcreative participationdesert • designers of the future • disadvantaged communitiesDIY • Duncan Gates • First Nations youthfroggame designgreen screenhomemade gamesimagineeringIndigenous Australiansindigenous community • indigenous games and play • Indigenous people • Indigenous young people • interactive comic • kids • lizard • Lovepunks Game • mining • mud flats • Murujuga • NEOMAD • online game • outdoor game • peacockpersonal empowerment • Pilbara desert • pogona • remote communities • Roebourne • salt flats • Satellite Sisters • sea • social arts • stop motion animationstop-frame animation • Stu Campbell • Telen Rodwell • Trevor Jamieson • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peopleWestern Australia • Woodside (natural gas company) • Yijala Yala Project • young designersyoung peoplezombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 NOVEMBER 2015

Tech Insider: 'Fallout 4' concept art

"The world of 'Fallout' is anachronistically stuck in the post-World War II era of American history. These images represent the retro-futuristic world of 2077, when the game begins."

1
2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

TAGS

2015 • 2287 • adventure game • Bethesda Game Studios • Bethesda Softworks • Bostonbunkercompanion characterconcept artElectronic Entertainment Expo (E3) • Fallout 4 • Fallout series • first-person gamesfirst-person point of viewMicrosoft Windows • non-playable character • nonlinear gameplay • nuclear disasternuclear waropen world • PEGI 18 • Playstation 4post-apocalyptic scenariopost-World War IIquestretro-futuristicrole-playing game (RPG) • scavenging • Tech Insider • third-person perspective • Todd Howard • underground bunker • Vault 111 • video game • vintage ink • wasteland • Xbox One

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2015

Life Is Strange: episodic video games prove as addictive as episodic television

"In another important respect, however, Life Is Strange is quite on-trend: it's being released episodically, every six weeks, in two- to three-hour instalments. The premiere episode arrived on 30 January; episode two followed at the end of March, and the next is set for May.

Dividing a title into chapters and publishing them in succession has become something of a phenomenon in the gaming industry in recent years. It started as a low-risk alternative to the usual blockbuster release strategy – and of late has begun to yield many games that, like Life Is Strange, might never have been green-lit under the traditional system.

Simon Parkin, a freelance writer on games for the New Yorker magazine, believes the popularity of the episodic approach has been 'facilitated by the rise of digital distribution methods', which have made it 'much easier and cheaper to release any number of titles'. Instead of pressing and shipping costly discs to brick-and-mortar stores, publishers can now upload a title to online marketplaces like Steam and Sony's Playstation Store, where players can download them instantly.

That ease of digital access has all but revolutionized the dissemination of games."

(Calum Marsh, 26 April 2015)

1
2

TAGS

2015 • adolescent female • awkward adolescence • branching options • butterfly effect • choices • digital distributiondistribution models • Dontnod Entertainment • episodic format • episodic interactive drama • episodic structurefemale protagonistgirl • graphic adventure • illustrative style • inner struggle • interactive narrative • Life Is Strange (2015) • Maxine Caulfield • media distribution • memory and identity • memory and nostalgia • Michel Koch • nostalgia • photography student • PolaroidPolaroid camera • Raoul Barbet • reverse timerewind time • Square Enix • third-persontime manipulationtime rewindtime-based game mechanic • travel back in time • video game

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 AUGUST 2015

Everybody's Gone to the Rapture

1
2

3

4

TAGS

2015deserted places • deserted village • disappearance • English village • epidemic • Everybodys Gone to the Rapture (2015) • first-person adventure • first-person gamesfirst-person point of viewgate • infection • life formslight pulses • mysterious disappearance • mysterious outbreakobservatoryopen world • outbreak • Playstation 4post-apocalyptic scenarioPS4 • quarantine area • rapture • SCE Santa Monica Studio • scientists • Shropshire • Sony Computer Entertainment • Sony Santa Monica • spontaneous human combustion • story-based experience • story-based game • The Chinese Room • tumour • unknown life form • video gamevillage • voiceover • Yaughton

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2015

The Last Guardian: a game about the relationship between a boy and a giant griffin-like monster

"When the Japanese game designer Fumito Ueda was a child, he loved to capture and care for wild animals. He was obsessed with the way they moved; and later as a young game designer he imported a copy of the Amiga classic Lemmings, seeing in it something other than a colourful puzzler. 'I sensed life on the TV screen for the first time in my life,' he said.

Since then, he has become famous for games that explore humanity and companionship. After joining Sony Japan's development studio in 1997, he oversaw two of the most fascinating and beautiful action adventures of the PlayStation 2 era: Ico and Shadow of the Colossus. These doleful, reflective titles, with their hazy visuals and vast silences, showed us new ways to tell stories and invoke emotions through games. The moment in Ico where the eponymous lead character takes the hand of Yorda, the princess he seeks to rescue from an evil queen, has become one of the great images of the medium.

But then, after the wonderful Shadow of the Colossus – a game that brought themes of loss, grief and the fundamental importance of friendship to the standard monster hunting archetype – came the wilderness years. A game codenamed Project Trico, about the relationship between a boy and a giant griffin-like monster, was mentioned, and then officially announced as The Last Guardian at E3 in 2009. Then years of uncertainty as the project shifted from PS3 to PS4, and Ueda announced his separation from Sony Japan.

Six years later at E3 2015, Sony began its hugely nostalgic press conference with a revelation: The Last Guardian was definitely in production for PS4. We now know that it is a joint project between Sony Japan and a new studio, Gen Design, formed by members of Ueda's old Team Ico group. The release date is a tentative 2016. There is still much work to be done. But you get the feeling that Sony Computer Entertainment chief Shuhei Yoshida, always a fan of Ueda's work, will do whatever it takes to push this through. It is happening."

(Keith Stuart, Friday 19 June 2015)

1
2

3

TAGS

2016action-adventureadventure game • animal companion • atmospheric presenceboycompanion character • companionship • E3Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3)environment as antagonist • epic minimalism • fantasy character • fantasy games • friendship • Fumito Ueda • game designer • Gen Design • giant griffin • grief • griffin • griffon • gryphon • hazy visuals • humanity • Ico (2001) • invoke emotions through games • legendary creaturelossmonster • monster hunting archetype • mythological beingPlaystation 2 • Project Trico • PS3PS4 • Shadow of the Colossus (2006) • Shuhei Yoshida • Sony Computer Entertainment • Sony Japan • tell stories through games • The Last Guardian • treacherous landscapevideo game • wild anima

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.