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Which clippings match 'Designing Experiences' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 DECEMBER 2014

ActiWait: gamifying a pedestrian crossing with interactive pong game

ActiWait "makes waiting at the crosswalk for the signal to change more fun. The game is played while the light is red for the waiting pedestrians: a touch screen is mounted on two signal posts opposite one another. It is operated with your finger. Modeled after 'Pong', the computer game that has long since become a classic, there are two bars on the display, with which–moved with your finger –a ball can be batted back and forth. You get a point for every time your opponent misses the ball. In other words, this is a classic game with a new look and, perhaps most surprising, in a very different environment. Another charming part of the game: the opponents meet completely spontaneously and randomly, without knowing each other.

The idea for the project was first visualized in 2012 in a short video clip, in which the situation was simulated to look very life–like. In actual fact, the video presentation was a perfectly crafted synthesis of animation and real images. The simulation was developed on the computer and projected onto the traffic–signal buttons filmed with a green screen."

(HAWK Press Office)

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TAGS

2012 • ActiWait • Christiane Dienel • computer gamecrosswalkdesign prototypedesign student projectdesigning experiencesgamificationGermany • HAWK Hildesheim • HAWK Hochschule fur angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst • Hildesheim • Holger Michel • Ingo Meyer • interaction designMasters studentspedestrian crossingplayPongproduct designpublic spacepublic space use • Stefan Woelwer • StreetPong (prototype) • traffic intersectiontraffic light • traffic light button • traffic signal • University of Applied Sciences and Arts • urban infrastructure • urban interaction • user experience design (UX)user interactions • wireless connection

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 OCTOBER 2014

Interactive dancing traffic lights make waiting more entertaining

"An interactive installation in Lisbon aims to encourage pedestrians to wait until it's safe to cross the road by making the traffic lights 'dance' using motion capture technology (+ movie).

Car brand Smart teamed up with advertising agency BBDO Germany to create a special pedestrian crossing light in the Portugese capital, featuring a red stick figure that dances to attract the attention of pedestrians who might otherwise walk out into the road.

The project was part of a wider marketing campaign by Smart to launch two new versions of its compact city car–the Smart ForTwo and the Smart ForFour–which also included a roadshow around Europe."

(Dezeen, 17 September 2014)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 OCTOBER 2013

Meredith Davis: A Call to Action for Design Educators

"I believe that design education, at the most fundamental level, views complexity as a problem to be overcome through reductivist artifacts, not as an inevitable and pervasive attribute of life in the post–industrial community. So if the future is about an ever–expanding web of connectedness, how are we preparing students for meaningful work in this complex world? I'd like to suggest that we're not. Despite the obvious emotional impact of Glaser's poster, he belongs to a generation in which the goal of design was to make things simple. Negroponte, on the other hand, is a technologist for whom the design goal is to render the complex manageable and to make complicated things meaningful.

Almost everything about today's graphic design education is matched to Glaser's worldview. We structure both curricula and projects in craft–based progressions from simple to complex, from the abstract to the contextualized. In typography classes, for example, we begin with the letter, and then advance to the word, sentence, paragraph, and page. Sequences of typography courses are built on this simple to complex progression, when opening InDesign demands that students address the formal and interpretive issues of publication design simultaneously; how do you defer a discussion of leading, of column width, of the modernist preconceptions of software, of language? The only option is default, and what kind of typographic lesson is that?

The reality is that our strategy for teaching typography is residue from how students could comp type in predigital times; by drawing. It is the organizational structure for every type book since James Craig's 1970 Designing with Type, but it holds less relevance for what students need to know about communication in a digital world. Typography today is a complex relational system that depends on the interplay of formal, technological, linguistic, and cultural variables. Yet we persist in teaching this progression of scale, isolating such variables within their own distinct conceptual frameworks and rules.

The same strategy exists for how students progress in other studies of form. Foundation lessons begin with abstraction: point, line, and plane; color wheels; and paper–folding exercises. We defer discussions of meaning and context until later levels of the curriculum and beginning students learn these abstraction principles only through patterns in what makes their teachers smile. Nothing about these studies resembles what students know about in the real world, and as a colleague recently suggested, what the clients of design see in our work. So what if we begin with the familiar and complex?"

(Meredith Davis, 4 April 2008, AIGA Boston Presentation)

Presentation made at W/Here: Contesting Knowledge in the 21st Century, Emily Carr University of Art+Design, Vancouver, Canada, 7–9 December 2011.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2013

Guitar Pee: cheeky marketing stunt uses interactive urinal guitar

"Guitar Pee is a urinal equipped with sensors that plays music when someone pees on it. The different strings play different electric sounds depending on the aim of the stream, and at the end of your session you can even send an 'MPee3' straight to your phone to share your moment. Clearly, this isn't a concept for the ladies but you can try to woo them with your song even if you don't have a clue how to play a real guitar (they don't have to know the source of your craft). After all, the Guitar Pee tagline is 'Music. We know it comes from everywhere.' We guess it's better to hear rock music when you pee than the generic trickling water sound."

(Natt Garun, 30 May 2012, Digital Trends)

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Almap BBDO • analogue correspondencebar • bathroom • BBDO • Billboard Magazine • Brazilcheekydesigning experiencesdouble entendreelectric guitarguitarguitar game • Guitar Pee • guitar solo • interactive advertisinginteractive music gamesinteractive toyintimate interaction • MPee3 • naughtyphallic symbol • phallus • playplayfulrock musicSan Paolosensorsoundmachinestoileturinaluser experience design (UX)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 APRIL 2013

Navimation: Exploring Time, Space & Motion in the Design of Screen Based Interfaces

"Interface design has often been considered a subsection of interaction design (Moggridge, 2007; Löwgren & Stolterman, 2004; Bagnara & Crampton Smith, 2006). In the shift from designing objects to designing experiences, interaction design needs to investigate temporal as well as spatial form (Redström, 2001; Mazé & Redström, 2005), and to see computation as basic material.

From a social, cultural and humanistic perspective, studies of the design of interactions and their contexts of use can be understood in terms of mediated communication and the historical, social, playful and aesthetic in digital design (Blythe, Overbeeke, Monk, & Wright, 2003; Lunenfeld, 1999). This approach has been framed as Communication Design (Morrison et al., in press). This mediational perspective of digital communication is informed by studies in new media, social semiotics, socio–cultural studies of learning and work, and practice–based research into multimodal composition in which mediated discourse itself undergoes change through active use (Jones & Norris, 2005; Morrison, in press). This view is distinct from the structuralist and directional or 'transmission' models of communication (e.g., Crilly, Maier, & Clarkson, 2008) that are not rooted in cultural and mediational theory. From a Communication Design perspective, the interface itself mediates; it is understood as socially and culturally constructed and situated. Such a perspective is not very widely articulated in discussions of the interface in design research. Further, few studies exist of dynamic, digital interfaces and their multimodal characteristics from a specifically media and Communication Design view (e.g., Skjulstad, 2007).

In their design activity, interaction designers invest heavily in the shaping of interfaces as symbolic and cultural texts. Alongside this attention to design, and with reference to user–driven studies, we also need to unpack the features and possible functions of these emerging forms of mediated communication. The proliferation of 'movement in the interface' demands that we pay attention to a variety of media types, genre conventions and earlier media, and to the ways that elements of these are combined in different configurations. Social semiotics provides some means for relating the various graphical, animational and kinetic aspects of dynamic interfaces within a wider communicative perspective.3"

(Jon Olav H. Eikenes and Andrew Morrison, 2010)

Jon Olav H. Eikenes and Andrew Morrison (2010). "Navimation: Exploring Time, Space & Motion in the Design of Screen–based Interfaces", International Journal of Design Vol 4, No 1.

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2010aesthetic experience • Andrew Monk • Andrew Morrison • animational communication • Anja Maier • Bill Moggridge • communication design • computation as material • cultural perspective • cultural texts • design for the screendesign researchdesigning experiencesdesigning objectsdigital communicationdigital design • dynamic digital interfaces • dynamic interfacesemerging digital media • emerging forms • Erik Stolterman • funology • genre conventions • Gillian Crampton Smith • graphical communication • humanistic perspectiveinteraction designinterface designInternational Journal of Design • Johan Redstrom • Jonas Lowgren • Kees Overbeeke • kinetic bodily logos • Mark Blythe • material thinking • media and communication design • media as material objectsmediated communication • mediated discourse • mediated interaction • mediational perspective • mediational theory • movement in the interface • multimodal characteristics • multimodal compositionmultimodal user interfaces • Nathan Crilly • navimation • new media • P John Clarkson • Peter Lunenfeld • Peter Wrigh • playfulnesspractice-based research • Ramia Maze • Rodney Jones • screen-based interface • Sebastiano Bagnara • Sigrid Norris • situated perspective • social perspective • social semiotics • socio-cultural studies of learning • spatial form • spatial ordersymbolic meaning • Synne Skjulstad • temporal form • transmission model of communicationuser-driven

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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