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29 JUNE 2012

College for Creative Studies: 1 in 5 Teenagers Will Experiment With Art

"College for Creative Studies's (CCS's) 'PSA' campaign, launched in September, has recently gone viral with more than 1,000,000 hits and shares on various social networking and blogging sites including Facebook and Twitter. Created by advertising agency, Team Detroit (Dearborn, MI), the campaign loosely parodies popular anti–drug campaigns from the 1980s and 90s. This light–hearted approach is intended to help recruit potential students to CCS...

'We understand that applying to an art and design College requires a serious commitment on the part of students and families. There is a competitive entry process and we offer students a rigorous education while providing graduates with a solid career trajectory,' says CCS President Richard L. Rogers. 'With this campaign we are able to convey a serious message in an amusing manner. We are grateful to Team Detroit for spearheading this great effort with their stellar pro–bono work. It is particularly impactful that CCS alumni Vic Quattrin, Brandi Keeler and Michael Burdick helped to develop the campaign.'

The entire campaign is supported by a fully–integrated marketing effort including print, broadcast, outdoor, cinema and online advertisements with the tagline, 'Talk to your kids about art school: a message from the College for Creative Studies.' It went viral due to a post from the Tulsa Oklahoma based Philbrook Museum of Art's Facebook page.

'As an institution that strongly embraces social media and its growing potential, we are always looking for compelling content to share with our online communities. This campaign certainly struck a chord with us on a humorous level, but it is the underlying sentiment and advocacy for the arts as a viable career path that made this campaign special. It was such a pleasure to play a part in this viral phenomenon,' says Online Communities Manager Jeff Martin, Philbrook Museum of Art."

(College for Creative Studies, Detroit)

[The 'PSA' campaign exploits the visual vernacular of public information campaigns such as the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.)]

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TAGS

1980s1990s2011ad campaignadvertising campaignadvocacy for the arts • anti-drug campaign • anti-drugs • art and designart and design careersart and design collegeart and design schoolart studentsarts advocacyBFA • broadcast campaign • career path • career trajectory • CCS • cinema campaign • College for Creative Studies • compelling content to share • DARE • Detroit • Drug Abuse Resistance Education • fully-integrated marketing • gone viralhumourintertextuality • lighthearted • marketing campaignMFA • online advertisements • online campaign • outdoor campaign • parody • Philbrook Museum of Art • print campaign • pro bono • PSApublic informationpublic service announcementrecruitment • students and families • talk to your kids about art schoolTeam Detroit • Tulsa Oklahoma • vernacular • viable career path • viral marketingvisual vernacularwent viral

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 DECEMBER 2011

Electronic Hybridity: The Persistent Processes of the Vernacular Web

"While mass–mediated communication technologies have empowered the institutional, participatory media offer powerful new channels through which the vernacular can express its alterity. However, alternate voices do not emerge from these technologies untouched by their means of production. Instead, these communications are amalgamations of institutional and vernacular expression. In this situation, any human expressive behavior that deploys communication technologies suggests a necessary complicity. Insofar as individuals hope to participate in today's electronically mediated communities, they must deploy the communication technologies that have made those communities possible. In so doing, they participate in creating a telectronic world where mass culture may dominate, but an increasing prevalence of participatory media extends into growing webs of network–based folk culture. "

(Robert Glenn Howard, 2008)

1). Robert Glenn Howard (2008). "Electronic Hybridity: The Persistent Processes of the Vernacular Web" Journal of American Folklore, Volume 121, Number 480, Spring 2008, pp. 192–218. DOI: 10.1353/jaf.0.0012

TAGS

1990sacademic journalagency • alternate voices • communication technologiesconsumer culturedigital revolution • electronic hybridity • electronic mediation • electronic technologiesexpressionfolklorefolksonomy • human expressive behaviour • hybrid formhybridity • image reproduction • instantaneousInternet • John Dorst • Journal of American Folklore • mass culture • mass distribution • mass media • mass-mediated communication technologies • medium is the messagemodes of communication • network-based folk culture • new communication technologies • new mediaparticipatory Internet mediaparticipatory mediaremediationsocial networking tools • technologies of cultural reproduction • telectronic age • telectronic world • vernacular • vernacular expression • vernacular production • vernacular web • webwiki

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2011

Monkey Magazine: a new publishing vernacular?

"In the future, as depicted in the 2002 film Minority Report, our periodicals will create interactive, hybrid reading/viewing experiences–with built–in sound and motion–based commercials rather than static advertisements, incorporating news footage with pages that dissolve and re–form to reflect breaking stories. Despite minute gestures in that direction, such as the Amazon Kindle and G24, The Guardian's PDF newspaper that's updated throughout the day, that vision of media–if there's really a market for it–is a long way off. ...

Nevertheless, something ... is now available weekly from Dennis Publishing, the company that gave the world The Week, Maxim and several other British 'lad magazines' as well as launched their American spin–offs. Monkey is proportioned like a glossy, has an interface that mimics the turning of pages and even has a magazine–like layout: margins, a basic two–column grid, images combined with text and print–like pacing. The difference is that Monkey's text sparkles (literally, if not figuratively), dances and slides onto the page. Many of the photos will turn into movies or slideshows (some rather naughty) when clicked, and on some spreads users can shuffle page elements, substituting one image for another. The format also changes to serve its content. A small mini–magazine with short reviews is digitally 'stitched' into the 'middle' of each issue. Additionally, most advertisements come alive, thanks either to Flash, streaming video or some combination, showing previews of movies or commercials for products framed by the equivalent of a full–page ad.

To be sure, Monkey does nothing that isn't done on other websites, and it has formal predecessors for its page interface–the arty This Is a Magazine, for one, and the webified versions of print glossies from Zinio for another. But unlike the wider web–which has evolved its own vocabulary and conventions for storytelling–and other web magazine predecessors–for which the turn–the–page interface seems a formal conceit–Monkey truly blends old and new media design conventions in a way that is both appalling and appealing."

(Jandos Rothstein, 29 January 2008)

Fig.1 Monkey Magazine, 2011. Dennis Publishing, Issue 183, pp.8,9.

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TAGS

Adobe FlashAIGAAmazon Kindleanimated presentationcelebritycontent formconventions • Dennis Publishing • design aestheticsdesign conventionsdesign for the screendesign vocabulary • digitally stitched • e-zine • experience design • ezine • formal conceit • G24 • hybridhybrid experiencehybrid forms • lads mag • magazinemagazine layout • Maxim (magazine) • mens magazine • mini-magazine • Minority Report • Monkey Magazine • motion-based commercials • multimedianaughtynew medianews footagenewspaper • page interface • page metaphorpaginationpastiche • PDF newspaper • pin-upprediction • print glossies • print-like • publishingreading experience • screen dissolve • sexslide showstorytellingstreaming videoThe Guardian • The Week (magazine) • This Is a Magazine • triviaturn-the-page interfacevernacularviewing experiencevisual communicationvisual languagevisual vernacularweb designweb magazineweb vernacularwebified • webzine • Zinio (magazine)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 OCTOBER 2010

The Internet of the 90's was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction

"To be blunt [the Internet of the 90's] was bright, rich, personal, slow and under construction. It was a web of sudden connections and personal links. Pages were built on the edge of tomorrow, full of hope for a faster connection and a more powerful computer. One could say it was the web of the indigenous...or the barbarians. In any case, it was a web of amateurs soon to be washed away by dot.com ambitions, professional authoring tools and guidelines designed by usability experts.

I wrote that change was coming 'soon' instead of putting an end date at 1998, for example, because there was no sickness, death or burial. The amateur web didn't die and it has not disappeared but it is hidden. Search engine rating mechanisms rank the old amateur pages so low they're almost invisible and institutions don't collect or promote them with the same passion as they pursue net art or web design.

Also new amateur pages don't appear at such amounts as ten years ago because the WWW of today is a developed and highly regulated space. You wouldn't get on the web just to tell the world, 'Welcome to my home page.' The web has diversified, the conditions have changed and there's no need for this sort of old fashioned behaviour. Your CV is posted on the company website or on a job search portal. Your diary will be organised on a blog and your vacation photos are published on iPhoto. There's a community for every hobby and question.

This is why I refer to the amateur web as a thing of the past; aesthetically a very powerful past. Even people who weren't online in the last century, people who look no further than the first 10 search engine results can see the signs and symbols of the early web thanks to the numerous parodies and collections organised by usability experts who use the early elements and styles as negative examples."

(Olia Lialina, February 2005)

Fig.1 Cyndi Howells. 'Cyndi's Genealogy Home Page Construction Kit'

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1990s2005ad-hocaestheticsamateur • amateur pages • animated gifauthoring toolbox modeldesign for the screendesign formalismdesign historydigital culture • dot.com • experthistoryhome pageInternetmasterymedia artMIDInet artnew mediaOlia Lialinaparticipationpastiche • personal links • regulated space • regulationtransformationunder constructionusability • usability experts • usability guidelines • vernacularvisual communicationvisual designvisual languagevisual literacywebweb designweb vernacularwww

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 MAY 2005

Differance: the formation of form

"The word 'differance', spelled with an 'a', is a coined term, and Derrida contrasts it with the vernacular term 'difference'. Patterns of 'Difference,' he explains, [are ] ...'produced' – deferred –– by 'differance' (Derrida, 1982, p.14). But what does this mean? That difference is deferred by differance? Imagine observing a quilt on the wall with patches of yellow, blue and white. If you notice the yellow and the non–yellow, you see a pattern of concentric boxes. If you notice the blue and the non–blue you see a chequered design. Each pattern is a play of differences, but it is a different set of differences when yellow is differentiated from non–yellow than when blue is differentiated from non–blue, a different set of differences that shows us different patterns. What is interesting about this shift from one pattern to the other is that it not only calls our attention to a new pattern, but that it suppresses our awareness of the other pattern. DifferAnce, defers a pattern of differences (say the pattern of differences between the blue and the not–blue). That is, one pattern of differences pushes into the background another possible play of patterns. You cannot study the pattern of yellows and the pattern of blues at the same time because differance causes one or the other patterns to be 'deferred'. DifferAnce is the hidden way of seeing things that is deferred out of awareness by our distraction with the imagery that captures our attention. Because it contains this other way to see things 'DifferAnce is the...formation of form.'(Derrida, 1976, p.63)."

(Lois Shawver)

Derrida, Jacques. 1982 Differance. In Jacques Derrida (Ed.), Margins of Philosophy, Chicago, USA: The University of Chicago Press.Derrida, Jacques. 1976 Grammatology, Baltimore, USA: The Johns Hopkins.

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TAGS

defer • deferment • degrees of interrelationdifferanceformation of formJacques Derrida • Lois Shawver • neographism • pattern • patterns of difference • polysemouspolysemyquiltvernacular
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