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Which clippings match 'Data Collection And Analysis' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 SEPTEMBER 2014

QSR International: NVivo 10

"If you want to get an edge by better understanding the explosion of unstructured data in the world today, you need NVivo - powerful software for qualitative data analysis. Whether you are working individually or in a team, on Windows or Mac, are new to research or have years of experience, there's an NVivo option to suit you."

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TAGS

audio analysis • content analysisdata analysis • data analysis software • data collection and analysisdocumentary materialinterview (research method)non-textual documentary material • NVivo • NVivo 10 • NVivo Server • primary sourcesQSR Internationalqualitative analysisqualitative data analysis • qualitative data analysis software • teaching resourcetranscriptunstructured datavideo interviews

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2013

Data Journalism Handbook 1.0

"This website is dedicated to providing anyone interested in getting started with data driven journalism with a collection of learning resources, including relevant events, tools, tutorials, interviews and case studies. The data journalism community and mailing list are dedicated to strengthening the community of journalists, designers, data providers and others, and encouraging collaboration and exchange of expertise."

(European Journalism Centre)

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2013analysing dataanalysis data • analysis model • analysis of quantitative informationdatadata analysisdata collection and analysis • data driven journalism • data gathering instrumentsdata infrastructuredata into informationdata journalism • Data Journalism Handbook • data miningdata-drivendigital humanitiesdigital journalism • Dutch Ministry of Education Culture and Science • European Journalism Centre (EJC) • handbookhistorical datajournalismOpen Knowledge Foundationquantitative dataquantitative informationstatisticstrend analysis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 AUGUST 2013

Thinking aloud: a method for systematically collecting and analysing data about the design process

"Suppose that you want to understand the design process of architects, the knowledge that they use, the cognitive actions that they take and the strategies they employ. How would you go about this? One obvious possibility is to ask some architects how they design a building. Interestingly enough, they will not find this an easy question to answer. They are used to do their job, not to explain it. If they do try to tell you how they go about their design work, it is quite possible that their account of it will be incomplete or even incorrect, because they construct this account from memory. They may be inclined to describe the design process neatly in terms of the formal design methods that they acquired during their professional training, whereas the real design process deviates from these methods. Psychologists have demonstrated that such accounts are not very reliable. Another possibility is to look at the architects' designs and at their intermediate sketches. However, now you are looking at the products of the thought processes of these architects, and not at the thought processes themselves. What is needed are more direct data on the ongoing thinking processes during working on a design. If you want to know how they arrive at their designs, what they think, what is difficult for them and what is easy, how they reconcile conflicting demands, a different research method is needed.

A good method in this situation is to ask architects to work on a design and to instruct them to think aloud. What they say is recorded and used as data for analysis of the design process. This is a very direct method to gain insight in the knowledge and methods of human problem–solving. The speech and writings are called spoken and written protocols. In this book we will describe a method for systematically collecting and analysing such think aloud protocols. This method can be used by psychologists and other social scientists who want to know more about cognitive processes. It is also an important method for knowledge engineers whose goal is to build a knowledgebased computer system on the basis of human expertise."

(Maarten W. van Someren, Yvonne F. Barnard, et al., 1994, pp.1–2)

Maarten W. van Someren, Yvonne F. Barnard and Jacobijn A.C. Sandberg. (1994). "The Think Aloud Method: A Practical Guide to Modelling Cognitive Processes".

TAGS

academic researchanalysing dataarchitectural thoughtcognitive actionscognitive processescognitive psychologycognitive sciencecognitive theoriesconceptual modeldata collection and analysisdata collection techniquesdesign knowledgedesign process • design strategies • design workdirect observationexperimental knowledgeformal design methods • human expertise • knowledge engineer • knowledge-based systems • problem-solvingpsychological analysispsychological modelsresearch methodsketching ideas • social scientists • spoken protocols • task analysis • testing theories • theoretical model • think aloud (research method) • think aloud protocols • thinking processthought process • unreliable evidence • user testinguser-based evaluation • written protocols

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2013

Qualitative Research: systematic observations of social behaviour with no preconceived hypotheses to be tested

"Qualitative research is concerned with nonstatistical methods of inquiry and analysis of social phenomena. It draws on an inductive process in which themes and categories emerge through analysis of data collected by such techniques as interviews, observations, videotapes, and case studies. Samples are usually small and are often purposively selected. Qualitative research uses detailed descriptions from the perspective of the research participants themselves as a means of examining specific issues and problems under study.

Qualitative research differs from quantitative research in that the latter is characterized by the use of large samples, standardized measures, a deductive approach, and highly structured interview instruments to collect data for hypothesis testing (Marlow, 1993). In contrast to qualitative research, in quantitative research easily quantifiable categories are typically generated before the study and statistical techniques are used to analyze the data collected. Both qualitative and quantitative research are designed to build knowledge; they can be used as complementary strategies."

(Ruth McRoy)

TAGS

ild knowledge • case studies • Christine Marlow • complementary strategies • data collection and analysisdeductive reasoning • descriptive validity reliability • detailed descriptions • enquiry and analysis • hypothesis testinginductive procedures • inductive process • large samples • nonstatistical methods • observations • problems under study • purposive selection • qualitative and quantitative research • qualitative research • quantifiable categories • quantitative researchresearch interview • research participants • Ruth McRoy • social phenomena • standardised measures • statistical techniques • structured interviews • themes and categories emerge • video (research method)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MAY 2013

With Enough Data, the Numbers Speak for Themselves...

"Not a chance. The promoters of big data would like us to believe that behind the lines of code and vast databases lie objective and universal insights into patterns of human behavior, be it consumer spending, criminal or terrorist acts, healthy habits, or employee productivity. But many big–data evangelists avoid taking a hard look at the weaknesses. Numbers can't speak for themselves, and data sets –– no matter their scale –– are still objects of human design. The tools of big–data science, such as the Apache Hadoop software framework, do not immunize us from skews, gaps, and faulty assumptions. Those factors are particularly significant when big data tries to reflect the social world we live in, yet we can often be fooled into thinking that the results are somehow more objective than human opinions. Biases and blind spots exist in big data as much as they do in individual perceptions and experiences. Yet there is a problematic belief that bigger data is always better data and that correlation is as good as causation."

(Kate Crawford, 12 May 2013, Foreign Policy)

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Apache Hadoop • biasbig data • big-data science • blind spot • causal relationshipscausationcodecomputer utopianism • consumer spending • criminal actscyberspacedata abstractiondata analysisdata collection and analysisdataset • Foreign Policy (magazine) • globalisationhealthy habitsimplicit informationimplicit meaningInternetinternet utopianism • looking at the numbers • network ecologynetworked society • objects of human design • patterns of human behaviourpatterns of meaningquantified measurementreliability and validityscientific ideas • security intelligence • social world • terrorist acts • Twitterunderlying order • universal insights • universal methoduniversal rationality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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