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Which clippings match 'Urban Space' keyword pg.2 of 3
18 MARCH 2011

From Urban Experiences to Architectural Narratives

"Cities are a densely coded context for narratives of discovery and the recovery of experience. They have a capacity to act as condensers of information and to integrate assimilations of behaviours, people, styles, typologies, forms, ideas. Cities are comprehended through spatial practices. Movement in the city is a major practice which enables us to accumulate and organize urban experiences. It creates spatial narratives containing memories and views, specific places, objects, beginnings and ends, distances, shadows, buildings or parts of them, encounters, signs and panoramas. Urban space becomes intelligible through sequences of movement. Its complexity, mystery, splendour, rhythm, are revealed and interrelated through the route of the urban dweller. Similarly to urban space, architectural space is perceived in terms of sequences and spatial practises. According to Jean Nouvel 'To erect a building is to predict and seek effects of contrasts and linkage through which one passes...in the continuous sequence that a building is...the architect works with cuts and edits, framings and openings...screens, planes legible from obligatory points of passage'."

(Vaso Trova)

Vaso Trova (2008). 24th NCBDS: 'We Have Never Been Pre–Disciplinary', Georgia Institute of Technology. Sabir Khan, Chair.

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TAGS

architectural narratives • architectural spacearchitecturebehaviourcitiesdwellingencountersexperienceframe • Jean Nouvel • legibility • linkage • memorymovementnarratives of discovery • NCBDS • place • points of passage • programmatic spacerhythmsequence of spacessequences and spatial practises • sequences of movement • spacespatial configurationspatial literacyspatial narrativesspatial practices • typologies • urban • urban dweller • urban experiences • urban spaceurbanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 NOVEMBER 2009

Heterotopia: hinterlands, wonderlands, borderlands and brothels

"Heterotopia can be described as a material space as well as a conceptual, virtual, urban, and even geopolitical spatial construct, including hinterlands, wonderlands, borderlands and brothels. Heterotopia is an unwieldy collection of Other space – including museums, military camps, colonies, libraries, and cemeteries."

(Ace Sophia, 13 February 2008)

Fig. 1 Fran's Star Ranch / Angel's Ladies (4miles North of Beatty, Nevada on U–95)

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TAGS

borderland • brothel • cemeterycolonyconceptual spaceconstructioncritical theory • geopolitical spatial construct • heterotopia • hinterland • librarymaterial space • military camp • museumother spacesprostitutespaceurban spacevirtual space • wonderland

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MAY 2009

Conflict in Cities and the Contested State

"'Conflict in Cities and the Contested State' is a five year research project starting in 2007 that focuses on divided cities as key sites in territorial conflicts over state and national identities, cultures and borders. The research objectives are to analyse how divided cities in Europe and the Middle East have been shaped by ethnic, religious and national conflicts, and conversely, how such cities can absorb, resist and potentially play a role in transforming the territorial conflicts which pervade and surround them. The project seeks to understand the cities as arenas of intensified ethno–national conflicts, particularly with respect to the role that architecture and the urban fabric play as a setting and background for everyday activities and events. Phenomena related to creating, maintaining, crossing, transcending or ignoring ethnic and territorial borders, both physical and symbolic, are central to the study.

Conflict in Cities and the Contested State is generously funded by the Economic and Social Research Council of Great Britain. It builds on an earlier project begun in 2003 and supported by the ESRC."

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TAGS

20032007architectureBelfastbelongingcitiesconflictcontested state • divided cities • Economic and Social Research CouncilESRC • ethno-national conflict • fenceidentityIrelandJerusalemnationhoodNorthern Irelandresearch project • sectarianism • spaceterritorial bordersterritory • tribalism • UKurban spacewall

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

Giant Corporation Insinuates Itself Through Guerrilla Tactics

"Microsoft unleashed a swarm of large adhesive butterflies in Manhattan.

They settled yesterday morning on sidewalks and doorways; traffic signals, stop signs and planters. They alighted on the bluestone paving around Grand Army Plaza and the granite corners around Grand Central Terminal.

Their blue, green, orange and yellow wings had spans of 12 to 20 inches, the larger ones accompanied by a caption –– 'It's better with the Butterfly' –– advertising Microsoft's new MSN 8 Internet service.

'This is nothing more than corporate graffiti,' said Vanessa Gruen, director of special projects for the Municipal Art Society, a civic organisation that has long battled commercialisation of public space. 'It's no better than all those kids out there tagging subway cars.'
...
A single summons was issued, with a [US] $50 penalty, though each butterfly could have been subject to a $50 fine, said Tom Cocola, the assistant commissioner for public affairs at the transportation agency. He said the city's chief goal was seeing to it that the decals [slickers] are removed.

Microsoft, for its part, insisted that it was authorised to place the decals."
(David W. Dunlap, New York Times, October 25, 2002)

[Pioneering example of guerrilla marketing tactics employed by Microsoft across Manhattan in 2002.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

Ad Campaign Appropriates Activism and Direct-Action

"Here's an ad campaign for Adidas new eco range, Grun, that is bringing together quite a few green concepts into one curious melange. First we've got the product––Adidas has a a new line of shoes which are made from recycled and natural materials. They are also making clothing from hemp and bamboo; the new Reground range is fully biodegradable, including the first ever completely biodegradable zipper. Their Recycled line is made of materials such as old tyres. Then the advertising and green link: they have joined up with dazed & confused (magazine) to encourage people to do guerilla gardening in grim and ugly places; swapping spray cans and tags for seeds and bulbs. Submit a picture of your efforts and the ten winners get a discount on any Adidas gear.

Then they have added a sculptural "art" element––this sinister looking "hand" (pictured) made of wicker and wire is 12 feet high and is perched on a shop roof, overlooking a busy street in London's hip east end, as part of the promotion. Another creation, now gone, was a skip full of flowers. They are planning ten more of these around town. It's all interesting, but what it adds up to is a bit of a confusing mish mash of green elements."

(Bonnie Alter, London on 04.21.08)

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TAGS

adad campaignAdidasadvertisementadvertisingappropriationart • biodegradable • commercialconsumerismecoenvironmentgreenguerrilla gardeningplantingre-purposerecycleurban spaceviral

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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