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23 NOVEMBER 2014

Protofarm 2050: guide to free farming (urban agricultural speculation)

"Design Indaba invited five designers to look beyond the possibilities and predictions currently in the public domain. Futurefarmers, 5.5 designers, Dunne&Raby, Revital Cohen and Frank Tjepkema each created a unique vision of the year 2050 with increased urbanisation and population, limited natural resources, climate challenges and digital–biological integration. Defining farming as the sustainable cultivation of a renewable resource, Design Indaba presented Protofarm 2050 at the ICSID World Design Congress in Singapore from 23 to 25 November [2009]."

(Design Indaba)

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20092050 • 5.5 designers • agricultural futures • agricultureAnthony Dunne • Anthony Lebosse • bookletcamouflage • Cape Town Design Festival • Claire Renard • climate challenges • climate change • dandelion • dark humour • Design Indaba • designers • digital-biological integration • Dunne and Raby • edible fauna • edible flora • ethical consumptionfarmingFiona Rabyfishingflora and faunafood • food design • food gathering activitiesfood security • food system • Frank Tjepkema • fruit • Futurefarmers (artist collective) • gleaning • hunting and gathering tactics • ICSID World Design Congress • Jean-Sebastien Blanc • leftovers • limited natural resources • meat consumption • Paris • pate • pigeon • poodlepopulation growth • Protofarm 2050 • prototype tools • rat • renewable resource • Revital Cohen • Seine • Singaporesite-specific interventionsSouth Africa • speculative approaches • speculative designspeculative proposals • speculative scenarios • speculative urbanism • starlingssustainabilitysustainable consumption • sustainable cultivation • tactical behaviourtactics • urban food • urbanisation • Vincent Baranger

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2012

Open Urban: Know Your City - Map, Inform, Discuss

"OpenUrban is the first open source user–generated web map and forum focusing on current and proposed urban development. It is a web platform for civic collaboration, a venue for debate, and an outlet and archive for information on urban development. We embrace crowd sourcing technology as a means to inform and empower. By combining written media with spatial information OpenUrban creates a powerful tool for people to understand how their cities are changing and supports their active participation in that change."

(OpenUrban, 2012)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 AUGUST 2010

The UK Soundmap project: mapping Britain's sonic environment

"The SoundMap is a partnership project of the British Library and the Noise Futures Network. It uses widely available mobile technology in a novel way to capture and aggregate research–quality audio samples. Your recordings will be studied by experts from the Noise Futures Network and we shall post an overview of the research results once sufficient data has been collected and analysed.

Britain's sonic environment is ever changing. Urbanisation, transport developments, climate change and even everyday lifestyles all affect our built and natural soundscapes. The sounds around us have an impact on our well being. Some sounds have a positive or calming influence. Others can be intrusive and disturbing or even affect our health. By capturing sounds of today and contributing to the British Library's digital collections you can help build a permanent researchable resource."

(The British Library Board)

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around usaudioaudio samplesbelongingcitycollectiveconvergencecountrysideculturedigital collectionsenvironmenteverydayexperiencegeographylifestylelocationlocation-specificmobilemobile technology • natural soundscapes • Noise Futures Network • placeplace-based contentrecordingresearchresourcesocial changesonic environmentsound • SoundMap • soundscapetechnologyUKurbanisationwellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2009

Big Hair: A Wig History of Consumption in Eighteenth-Century France

"Historians of consumption have generally followed social theorists in emphasizing two different aspects of modernity. While social scientists emphasize long term processes of 'modernization,' such as urbanization and industrialization, cultural historians and literary critics define modernity in terms of consciousness, stressing in particular the development of a reflexive self and a heightened awareness of one's present age as new and set off from the past.(4) Both understandings of modernity underpin current historical literature on eighteenth–century Western European consumption. Highlighting socioeconomic processes of commercialization, historians argue that eighteenth–century Western Europe experienced a 'consumer revolution' as men and women freed themselves from the grip of scarcity to initiate a buying spree of historic proportions. Although its geography and periodization remain highly controversial, such a revolution is commonly represented as a step toward modern consumer society.(5) At the same time, the study of consumption, especially French consumption, has taken a cultural turn, opening new doors between the Enlightenment and late modernity. (6) Daniel Roche, whose work has defined the field, argues that the birth of consumption was an integral part of a larger cultural change in which the traditional values of a stationary Christian economy gradually gave way to the egalitarianism and individualism of modern commodity culture. For Roche, the story is principally one of emancipation: 'It is important to recognize that . . . commodities did not necessarily foster alienation; in fact, they generally meant liberation.'(7) The diffusion of fashion led to 'a new state of mind, more individualistic, more hedonistic, in any case more egalitarian and more free.'(8) Less optimistic than Roche but equally intent on establishing a connection between Enlightenment consumption and modernity, Jennifer Jones contends that the late–eighteenth–century discourse on fashion helped to produce modern, essentialized definitions of gender. As social differentiation faded from fashion commentary, gender differentiation took its place.(9)"

(Michael Kwass, p.633, The American Historical Review, 111.3)

Fig.1 FRONTISPIECE: Wigs. Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonnée des sciences, des arts et des métiers. Recueil de planches, sur les sciences, les arts libéraux, et les arts méchaniques, avec leur explication, 11 vols. (Paris, 1762–1772), s.v. "Perruquier."

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changecollaborationcommercialisationconsciousness • consumer revolution • consumer societyconsumerismconsumptioncostume design • cultural historian • Daniel Roche • egalitarianism • emancipationEuropean EnlightenmentfashionFrancegender differentiationgeographyhairhedonismhistoryindividualismindustrialisation • Jennifer Jones • late modernityliterary criticmodernisationmodernityperiodisation • reflexive self • social change • social constructionist • social differentiationsocietysocio-economictraditiontransformationurbanisation • Western Europe • wig

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2009

Charmed: Tangible Virtual Life Simulation 2007

"The touch sensitive screens of Charmed offer intimate views into a virtual world accessed via three glowing resin pods. Each pod provides an entry point to inhabitants of suburban neighbourhoods, apartment buildings and city spaces. Within these highly evolved snow domes, a black and white linear aesthetic depicts a world populated by mesmerized figures carrying out the routine tasks required of their environments. Haptic gestures, like touching or tapping, provide a pathway into the spaces and a connection with the cultures, uncovering the diminutive details of the lives of these animated figures. Touching the screen can break the spell and provoke change. Repeated tapping can cause chaos, disrupting lives, forcing computers to malfunction and causing traffic accidents. Tapping can impact inhabitants, even causing a man to drink so much that the inevitable happens and he wets his pants. In Charmed each portal offers an impression of omnipotence as private lives and public spaces are exposed and controlled by our touch."

(Priscilla Bracks, Gavin Sade and Matt Dwyer)

Fig.1 Footage recorded by Gavin Sade and Priscilla Bracks at ISEA 2008, Singapore

Fig.2 Gavin Sade, Priscilla Bracks and Matt Dwyer. 'Charmed' ISEA 2008 Conference proceedings

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2007artAustraliaExperimenta • Experimenta Playground • Gavin Sadeinteraction designinteractiveinterface • International Biennial of Media Arts • International Symposium on Electronic Art • ISEA • ISEA 2008 • Matt Dwyer • media arts • pod • Priscilla BracksrealitysimulationSingaporesocial agencytangibletouchurbanisationvirtual

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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