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Which clippings match 'Sound Correspondence' keyword pg.1 of 1
31 OCTOBER 2014

Bartholomäus Traubeck: A record player that plays slices of wood

"A tree's year rings are analysed for their strength, thickness and rate of growth. This data serves as basis for a generative process that outputs piano music. It is mapped to a scale which is again defined by the overall appearance of the wood (ranging from dark to light and from strong texture to light texture). The foundation for the music is certainly found in the defined ruleset of programming and hardware setup, but the data acquired from every tree interprets this ruleset very differently."

(Bartholomäus Traubeck)

A record player that plays slices of wood. Year ring data is translated into music, 2011. Modified turntable, computer, vvvv, camera, acrylic glass, veneer, approx. 90x50x50 cm. Thanks to Land Salzburg, Schmiede, Pro–ject Audio, Rohol Furniere, Karla Spiluttini, Ivo Francx, Christoph Freidhöfer, vvvv.

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2011analogue correspondence • Bartholomaus Traubeck • Christoph Freidhofer • computational designconcentric circles • design interactions • experimental musicgenerative music • Ivo Francx • Karla Spiluttini • Land Salzburg • modified hardware • patternpiano music • Pro-ject Audio • record player • ring data • Rohol Furniere • rule-based work • ruleset • Schmiede • Schmiede Hallein • sliced • slices of wood • sonic artssound correspondencesound experiments • speculative interactions • speculative music • tree ringsturntablevvvvwood • Years (2011)

CONTRIBUTOR

Anna Troisi
04 AUGUST 2014

Eduardo Paolozzi: Turkische Musik, 1974

"Eduardo Paolozzi's work often, as in the Türkische Musik series, may be printed in different color schemes or on different papers. All these elements combine to suggest that the image is often discovered in the act of creating it; the artist's role is integrally balanced between active calculation and chance. No longer confined to a single plan, the artist–printmaker and his work signify an exciting new order of print– making, one in which technological expertise becomes a useful vehicle for personal expression."

(Georgette Lee, 1986)

Precision of Image: Technology in Printed Art : 20 April – 7 September, 1986, The Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery at Syracuse University in Syracuse.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2013

How much of a language is silent? What does it look like when you take the silence out? Can we use code as a tool to answer these questions?

"silenc is a tangible visualization of an interpretation of silent letters within Danish, English and French.

One of the hardest parts about language learning is pronunciation; the less phonetic the alphabet, the harder it is to correctly say the words. A common peculiarity amongst many Western languages is the silent letter. A silent letter is a letter that appears in a particular word, but does not correspond to any sound in the word's pronunciation.

A selection of works by Hans Christian Andersen is used as a common denominator for these 'translations'. All silent letters are set in red text. When viewed with a red light filter, these letters disappear, leaving only the pronounced text.

silenc is based on the concept of the find–and–replace command. This function is applied to a body of text using a database of rules. The silenc database is constructed from hundreds of rules and exceptions composed from known guidelines for 'un'pronunciation. Processing code marks up the silent letters and GREP commands format the text.

silenc is visualized in different ways. In one form of a book, silent letters are marked up in red yet remain in their original position. In another iteration, silent letters are separated from the pronounced text and exhibited on their own pages in the back of the book, the prevalence of silent letters is clearly evident."

(Momo Miyazaki, Manas Karambelkar and Kenneth Aleksander Robertsen)

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2012alphabetbookCIIDCopenhagen Institute of Interaction Designcorrelative analogueDanishEnglish • exceptions • find-and-replace • FrenchGREP • GREP command • Hans Christian Andersen • Kenneth Aleksander Robertsen • language • learning language • legibility • Manas Karambelkar • Momo Miyazaki • phonetics • Processing (software)pronunciationredrules • Silenc (project) • silence • silent letter • sound correspondencetangible visualisationtexttranslation • visualisation interpretation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 OCTOBER 2005

Vinylvideo: a system that lets you listen to your images

VinylVideo is an art project created by a group of Austrian artists/engineers (Gebhard Sengmüller, Martin Diamant, Günter Erhart, Stefan Gyöngyösi, Rike Frank, Rachel Stevens) that enables video to be encoded and stored on vinyl records. The process requires the use of a proprietary system called VinylVideo Home Kit.

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analogue correspondenceartaudio • Best Before • correlative analogue • Diamant • Erhart • Frank • Gyongyosi • interpret meaningslistenlistening to images • Rachel Stevens • retro • Sengmuller • soundsound correspondencestereoturntable • vinylvideo • visualisation
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