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Which clippings match 'United Nations' keyword pg.1 of 2
06 OCTOBER 2015

Hans Rosling: Don't Panic - The Truth About Population

"'Don't Panic' is a one-hour long documentary produced by Wingspan Productions and broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

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2013BangladeshBBC2birth and deathchanging worldchild mortalitycountry and comparative datadata visualisationdebunkingdemographicsdeveloping countriesdifferent strata of society • Dollar Street • economic developmentenvironmental determinismenvironmental statistics • extreme poverty • family planning • Gapmindergender equalityglobal population • global portrait • Hans Roslinghuman history • human mortality • ignorance survey • Indiainfographics • life expectancy • mortalityour planetPeoples Republic of Chinapopulation change • population explosion • population growthpopulation statisticspovertypreconceptionsmall data • social development • social inequalitystatistical graphicsstatistician • street metaphor • sustainable global development • television documentary • understanding statistics • United Nationsvisualising data • Wingspan Productions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JULY 2014

Jewish Voice for Peace: Israel/Palestine 101

Fig.1 short animated introduction to Israel–Palestine situation created by Jewish Voice for Peace.

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1937194719482D animationautonomyawareness raisingbelligerencecivil libertiesconflictcontested state • David Ben-Gurion • demolition • expropriation • fertile landGaza StripGeneva conventionhegemonyhistoryhistory of conflicthuman rights violationideological intoleranceillegal behaviour • illegal settlement • indignities • international community • international consensus • IsraelIsraeli-Palestinian conflictJewish peopleJewish settlers • Jewish state • Jewish Voice for Peace • Middle Eastmilitarized resistance movements • military force • militia • nationhood • occupied territory • occupying powerownershipPalestine • Palestinian Arabs • Palestinian territories • partition • partition plan • peace • Peel partition plan • Peel plan • polemic • protestrefugeerespectRonald Reagansegregationsettlement • sovereign states • sovereigntyState of IsraelState of Palestineterritorial bordersterritorialisationterritorytoleranceUnited NationsUnited Stateswallwarwar over water • West Bank • Zionist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2011

H2Oil: dramatic animated expository sequences

"Alberta sits over one of the largest recoverable oil patches in the world, second only to Saudi Arabia. It covers 149, 000 square kilometers, an area larger than Florida, and holds at least 175 billion barrels of recoverable crude bitumen. Canada has become the largest supplier of oil to the U.S., with over a million barrels per day coming from the oil sands. Currently 40% of all oil produced in Canada is derived from the oil sands.

The crude oil produced from the oil sands, the dirtiest oil in the world, could keep the global appetite for oil at bay for another 50 years.

But oil sands are a fundamentally different kind of oil. They take a lot of energy and a lot of water and leave a very large environmental footprint compared to all other forms of oil extraction. Because of this, the massive changes to the boreal forest and the watershed have prompted the United Nations to list this region as a global hot spot for environmental change.

In addition, oil sands projects are major emitters of greenhouse gases. They accounted for 4% of Canada's greenhouse gas emissions in 2005, making it impossible to meet obligations set out in Kyoto for emissions–reductions."

(H2Oil)

Fig.1 Dale Hayward & Sylvie Trouvé, James Braithwaite, Daniel Legace. 'La Moustache'.

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20092D2D animationAfter Effects • Alberta • animated presentationanimation • bitumen • Boreal Forest • Canadaconsumptioncrude oil • Dale Hayward • Daniel Legace • documentaryenvironmentenvironmental change • environmental footprint • ethicsexpositionFloridagreenhouse gas emissionsgreenhouse gases • H2Oil • illustrationJames Braithwaite • Kyoto • La Moustache • motion designmotion graphicsnatureobsolescenceoiloil extraction • oil sands • overburden • Saudi Arabiasequence design • Shannon Walsh • sustainabilityUnited Nationsvisual essaywastewater

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2009

A globally networked system of non-governmental actors

"'Globalization' is a term that has only recently become widespread – whereas the phenomenon that it designates can be traced back far into the past. Therefore, it was rightly emphasized by George Modelski that (political) processes of globalization had already begun in the Middle Ages (see 17). Thus, in the course of time, there came about a globally networked system of states. Today there exists alongside of and parallel with the state–centred system of international politics, which is represented by institutions like the 'United Nations', an even more powerful globally networked multi–centric system of non–governmental actors (see 18 as well as 19), for which the term 'World–Society' (20) possesses a certain justification (see also 21). However, the politics of the institutional (nation–)state lag behind especially this latest development (see 22: 179) and they therefore contribute to their own critical scrutiny and decline. That's true though it does not mean the final 'End of Nation State' (23): Even in view of efforts towards regionalisation, as in the 'European Union', the nation state has not yet been replaced as the defining structural moment of world politics (see e.g. 24 and 25).

Naturally, when speaking of globalization, we – whether euphorically or in a critical vein – most often refer to economic processes rather than the sphere of politics. Here, too, 'real' history does not begin at present but can be traced far back into the past. For already in antiquity, but especially since early modern times, there existed strong commercial relations, which reached as far as the world known at that time (see 26: ch. 2). Particularly in the era of imperialism, in the 19th century, worldwide commerce was flourishing – because the gold standard provided for security and the 'unequal exchange' (Emmanuel) between the colonies and the imperialist nations guaranteed enormous profits (see 26). It is not surprising therefore that Marx and Engels in 'The Communist Manifesto' could already in 1848 portray a picture of a highly globalized economy. Yet, the development of international trade suffered considerable setbacks – on account of the First World War, which resulted in the total breakdown of the gold standard, and then once again in the 1970s, evoked by the oil crisis. This relative level of internationalization/ globalization attained in the commercial sector at the beginning of the 20th century would only be reached again in the middle of the 1980s (see 27)."
(Anil K. Jain, Heiner Keupp, Renate Höfer, Wolfgang Kraus)

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1980sAnil Jain • Communist Manifesto • Frederick Engels • George Modelski • globalisationHeiner Keupp • internationalization • Karl Marxmiddle agesnation statenetwork societypost-traditionalsocietyUnited NationsWolfgang Kraus • World-Society

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 DECEMBER 2008

Motion typography: Universal Declaration of Human Rights

"the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was first outlined by the United Nations General Assembly at the Palais de Chaillot of Paris in 1948. Upholding the fundamental covenants of humanity, dignity and equality – in short, standards of living far too often taken for granted despite the ongoing and appallingly widespread human rights abuses evident worldwide – it was ratified by individual nations in 1976 and has since been upheld as a Bill of international law. With yesterday, the 10th December, marking its anniversary in the celebration of Human Rights Day, the video above is a subtle yet beautifully concise presentation of the thirty Articles contained within the Declaration. Created by artist and shoe designer Seth Brau, produced by Amy Poncher and featuring music by the LA–based Rumspringa (courtesy of Cantora Records, home of MGMT), it is as much of a fantastic exercise in motion typography as it is a worthy reminder of the importance and value of human life."
(Sarah Badr, pieces–at–random.com)

[An ad campaign by the Human Rights Action Center for Burma's National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi. The ad draws on the sentiment expressed in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.]

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1948adadvertising • Aung San Suu Kyi • autonomyBurmacampaigncitizenshipculturedesign formalismethicsgovernancehuman rightsinfluential womenlawmotion graphicsmotion typographyMyanmarparticipationresponsibilitysocial changesocietyUnited Nations • Universal Declaration of Human Rights • women in politics

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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