Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Ubiquitous' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 JANUARY 2014

What industry say fusion skills really are?

Friday 31st January 2014 at the London Knowledge Lab: Presentations 1:30–2:30; Demos 2:30–3:30; Discussion and debate: 3:30–4:30.

"Digital media is now ubiquitous and embedded all around us even when we are not connected via our range of devices, so its no surprise that the government sees the creative industries as a priority area for growth. One factor key to its success is that of the so–called 'Fusion Skills': mixes of creative media, STEM and enterprise. The fusion of these three elements is an increasing demand from industry voices and seen as an answer to new digital innovation. In 2012, The Creative Industries Council (that reports to two ministers of state) called Fusion 'the new skills imperative' and one of eight challenges that need to be addressed in order to unlock growth. This 'what the research says' event attempts to unpack and explore Fusion in theory and practice, hearing from industry and educators. It's said that Higher Education faculty and discipline silos necessitate against fusion learning and teaching. ...

How do we co–opt students who are resistant to such abstract ideas, preferring outdated career caricatures from sources of variable quality? Where should interventions be– secondary school? Postgraduate? Is there hard evidence that Fusion skills are needed?"

(London Knowledge Lab)

TAGS

2014arts and humanities • career charicatures • computer sciencecreative economycreative industries • Creative Industries Council • creative media • creative problem solving skills • current thinking • digital mediadigital technology • disciplinary silos • embeddedenterpriseenterprise and creativity • Fusion Challenge • fusion skill • fusion skills • industry voices • interdisciplinary approacheslearning and teaching • Learning Innovation Education • LKL Innovations • LondonLondon Knowledge LabNESTA • new digital innovation • priority area for growth • Saint John Walker • silosSTEM subjects • the new skills imperative • theory and practice • TransFusion Conference • ubiquitousUK • unlock growth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2010

The Internet of Things: What is a Spime and why is it useful?

"World–renowned Science Fiction writer and futurist Bruce Sterling will outline his ideas for SPIMES, a form of ubiquitous computing that gives smarts and 'searchabiliity' to even the most mundane of physical products. Imagine losing your car keys and being able to search for them with Google Earth. This same paradigm will find you "wrangling" with product–lifecycle– management systems that do for physical objects what the iPod has done for music. These and other radical ideas are delivered in Sterling's latest book`Shaping Things'. This concise book was written to inspire designers to visualize radical scenarios connecting information technology and sustainability in a new ecology of artifacts. Sterling suggests new connections between the virtual world and the physical world that will have you rethinking many of your assumptions about how we relate to products. He will be joined by Scott Klinker, 3–D Designer–in–Residence at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, MI who leads a graduate design program known for giving form to experimental cultural ideas. Klinker's own design work focuses on digital customization as industry shifts from mass production toward niche production in a networked society. The presentation will include an invitation for Sterlling and Klinker/ Cranbrook to team–up with Google to create a short documentary film that would portray a speculative future of life with SPIMES. Distributed online, this short film would convey the look and feel of SPIME scenarios as a provocation for widespread industry discussion about the new potentials of ubiquitous, ambient, searchable, geolocative products."

(Google Tech Talks, 30 April 2007)

1

TAGS

2007ambientBruce Sterling • Cranbrook • Cranbrook Academy of Art • digital customisation • distributed online • experimental cultural ideas • geolocative products • Google EarthGoogle Inc • industry shifts • information technologyinternet of thingsiPod • management systems • mass productionnetworked societynew connections • new ecology of artefacts • niche production • physical objectsphysical worldproduct-lifecycle • radical scenarios • sci-fi • Scott Klinker • searchability • searchable • Shaping Things • speculative futureSPIMESsustainabilityubiquitousubiquitous computingvirtual world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2010

Jesse James Garrett: The State Of User Experience

"As the field of user experience grows and evolves, UX practitioners find themselves having to master new techniques to take on new challenges. Adaptive Path's Jesse James Garrett takes a look at where user experience has been and where it's going."

(UX Week 2009 | Adaptive Path)

1
2

TAGS

2009Adaptive Path (consultancy)agencyBrian Enocinematographydesigndigital culture • elements of user experience • engagementephemeralexperienceexperience designinformation architectureJesse James Garrettmasterymaterialitymeaningmobilemultichannel • Music for Airports • perception • sensorial design • softwareubiquitoususeruser experienceuser experience design • UX Week • web
18 JUNE 2009

Ubiquitous web font embedding just got a step closer...

"A short while ago, Mozilla announced that Firefox 3.1 will, along with Safari which already does, support the @font–face mechanism for linking to online TrueType fonts. Internet Explorer already supports (and has done so for years) @font–face font linking, but here's the catch, not to TrueType fonts – only to EOT font files. EOT, now a proposed W3C specification, incorporates anti copying technology, helping to assuage the fears of font foundries that font linking in browsers would unleash a wave of unlicensed copying of their fonts. Chris Wilson, Platform Architect for Internet Explorer has made it clear that he's strongly opposed to simple font linking

we (Microsoft) should NOT support direct TTF/OTF embedding, unless 1) there is some check that the font intended that use to be allowed, which I don't think there currently is (as it needs to refer to the license agreement), AND 2) other browsers also implement a system that actually ENABLES commercial fonts – those that are allowed to be embedded, but cannot be legally placed directly on a server – to be used

So, is this a return to the stalemate of the 1990s, when both the major browsers supported font linking, only of a completely incompatible type? From a technical point of view, no. Since the same mechanism, @font–face rules, is used to link to TrueType, EOT and other font formats, then it is quite simple to define multiple fonts, and the browser can use the font format it supports."
(John Allsopp, 19 October 2008)

1

TAGS

copyrightEOTFirefoxfont embeddingfont-facefontsInternet ExplorerMicrosoftMozillaownershiptechnology • TrueType • TrueType fonts • typeubiquitousubiquitous web fontsweb

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2008

Clay Shirky on Social Media and Groups

"Clay brings the conversation about social media and its affect on our communications and group forming abilities through a series of easy to grasp examples. He looks at Sharing. Del.icio.us reverses the old order of sharing – we used to get together in groups and then share. Whereas tagging now allows us to share and then form groups. Look at Flickr where you can post your tagged images on an event then go find others who have also posted on it. The example is HDR photography on Flickr which originated from someone putting the first HDR image up and another person asked how to achieve it. Soon, around HDR the interest group formed. A community of practice. Then Conversation."
(Steven Clark)

[a useful discussion – if somewhat techno–utopian and teleological]

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.