Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Pope Francis' keyword pg.1 of 1
26 JANUARY 2016

Interview: Zygmunt Bauman: 'Social media are a trap'

"Q. You are skeptical of the way people protest through social media, of so-called 'armchair activism,' and say that the internet is dumbing us down with cheap entertainment. So would you say that the social networks are the new opium of the people?

A. The question of identity has changed from being something you are born with to a task: you have to create your own community. But communities aren't created, and you either have one or you don't. What the social networks can create is a substitute. The difference between a community and a network is that you belong to a community, but a network belongs to you. You feel in control. You can add friends if you wish, you can delete them if you wish. You are in control of the important people to whom you relate. People feel a little better as a result, because loneliness, abandonment, is the great fear in our individualist age. But it's so easy to add or remove friends on the internet that people fail to learn the real social skills, which you need when you go to the street, when you go to your workplace, where you find lots of people who you need to enter into sensible interaction with. Pope Francis, who is a great man, gave his first interview after being elected to Eugenio Scalfari, an Italian journalist who is also a self-proclaimed atheist. It was a sign: real dialogue isn't about talking to people who believe the same things as you. Social media don't teach us to dialogue because it is so easy to avoid controversy… But most people use social media not to unite, not to open their horizons wider, but on the contrary, to cut themselves a comfort zone where the only sounds they hear are the echoes of their own voice, where the only things they see are the reflections of their own face. Social media are very useful, they provide pleasure, but they are a trap."

(Ricardo de Querol, El País, 19 January 2016)

TAGS

abandonment • armchair activism • being-in-the-worldclicktivismcomfort zonecommunityconnection made to measurecontroversydifferent perspectivesdigital lifedigital technology and human relationships • dumbing down • echo chamber • Eugenio Scalfari • feeling in control • identity performanceindividualisation • individualist age • insular communitiesliving in a shared worldloneliness • opium of the people • performativityPope Francis • real dialogue • sensible interaction • social fragmentationsocial interactionsocial mediasocial networks • social skills • sociologistspectatorship • trap • Zygmunt Bauman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JUNE 2015

Pope Francis's encyclical on the environment: a global call to action

"The pope's 180-page encyclical on the environment, released on Thursday, is at its core a moral call for action on phasing out the use of fossil fuels. But it is also a document infused with an activist anger and concern for the poor, casting blame on the indifference of the powerful in the face of certain evidence that humanity is at risk following 200 years of misuse of resources. Up to now, he says, the world has accepted a 'cheerful recklessness' in its approach to the issue, lacking the will to change habits for the good of the Earth. 'Climate change is a global problem with grave implications: environmental, social, economic, political and for the distribution of goods,' the papal statement says. 'It represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day.'"

(Stephanie Kirchgaessner, 18 June 2015, The Guardian)

1

TAGS

2015 • basic and universal human right • biosphere • blame • call to actionclimate change • debt to the poor • destructive practicesdeveloping countriesEarthecological crisis • economic implications • encyclical • environmental consequencesexploitation of natural resourcesfossil fuelglobal challenge • green manifesto • humanityindifference • papal statement • planet Earth • political implications • Pontiff • poorer countries • Pope Francis • practical guidance • recklessness • selfishness • social debt to the poor • social implications • social justice and reform • speaking out • sustainable development • taking concrete steps • The Guardian • undeniable risk

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2013

Overt technological change witnesses an enduring tradition

"In 2005, visitors packed into the expansive boulevard leading up to St. Peter's Square as Pope John Paul II's body was carried into the crowd for public viewing in the days following his death. Taken nearly two years before the iPhone debuted, the photo is striking now for its appearance straight out of another era.

For anyone who has ever been to a concert, the photo at bottom, taken Tuesday night as Pope Francis made his inaugural appearance on the Vatican balcony, seems almost ordinary. The two, taken together, reflect a world changing, even as some ancient traditions stay the same."

(Carlo Dellaverson, 13 March 2013, NBC News)

Fig.1 Luca Bruno / AP, The faithful gather in 2005 near St. Peter's to witness Pope John Paul II's body being carried into the Basilica for public viewing.

Fig.2 Michael Sohn / AP, St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, on March 13, 2013.

1

TAGS

20052013ancient traditions • another era • ArgentinacacophonyCatholic • Catholic leader • changing behaviourschanging timeschanging worldChristian • concert • digital ageelectronic ageinaugural addressiPhone • Jorge Mario Bergoglio • mobile phone • NBC News • participative mediaphotoPopePope Francis • Pope John Paul II • ritual • St Peters Square • symbolic behaviourtradition • Vatican City • visitors

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.