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Which clippings match 'TV' keyword pg.2 of 9
31 JULY 2013

Are Youtubers Revolutionizing Entertainment?

"Over the past 8 years, YouTube has given birth to an increasingly sophisticated entertainment culture that operates outside of the traditional television and film ecosystem. With humble roots in charismatic and creative people simply sharing their lives, thoughts, and humor to their webcams, YouTube entertainment has diversified and grown into tens of thousands of unique channels with millions of loyal fans and subscribers. With a new generation of viewers increasingly turning to YouTube instead of broadcast TV, a new industry is being built around personalities who have dissolved the barriers between on–screen talent and the audience, and who employ visual aesthetics that make the viewer feel as if they are a part of the creator's life. Truly, we are in a new era of entertainment, one being led by millions of young people who are equally happy to watch video on their laptop as they are on their TV."

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amateur cultural productionamateur videoaudiencebeyond the world of broadcastingbroadcast television • charismatic people • confessiondigital narcissism • entertainment culture • entertainment experienceeveryday peoplefansfeedback loop • instant feedback • intimate exchangesintimate lives • Jake Roper • Josh Cohen • Joshua Green • Kornhaber Brown • laptop video • machinimamedia ecologies • media ecosystem • Molly Templeton • new era of entertainment • new forms of television • new industry • new media content productionnew television culturenew voicesnew ways of engagingOff Book • on-screen talent • PBSpersonalitiesproducers and consumers • sharing their lives • their thoughts • TVuser-generated contentvideo bloggerwebvideoyoung peopleYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 NOVEMBER 2012

Max Headroom: an anarchic and irreverent cybernetic protagonist

"Max Headroom was one of the most innovative science fiction series ever produced for American television, an ambitious attempt to build upon the cyberpunk movement in science fiction literature. The character of Max Headroom, the series's unlikely cybernetic protagonist, was originally introduced in a 1984 British television movie, produced by Peter Wagg, and starring Canadian actor Matt Frewer. ABC brought the series to American television in March 1987, refilming the original movie as a pilot but recasting most of the secondary roles. The ABC series attracted critical acclaim and a cult following, but only lasted for fourteen episodes. The anarchic and irreverent Max went on to become an advertising spokesman for Coca–Cola and to host his own talk show on the Cinemax cable network."

(The Museum of Broadcast Communications)

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1980s198780s television • American television • anarchicBlade Runner (1982)Bruce SterlingCoca-Colacomputer animation • cult following • cyberneticcyberpunk • cyberpunk movement • cyberspace • irreverent • Matt Frewer • Max Headroom • Museum of Broadcast CommunicationsNeuromancer • Pat Cadigan • Peter Wagg • Rudy Ruckerscience fiction literaturescience fiction television series • telefilm • televisiontelevision series • The Road Warrior • TVWilliam Gibson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 AUGUST 2012

Alfred Hitchcock interviewed by Tom Snyder in 1973

"Long thought to be lost or destroyed a complete recording has been found of one of the few hour long interviews of Alfred Hitchcock . Originally broadcast as one of the first Tomorrow Shows with Tom Snyder in the Fall of 1973. This recording is from a second repeat of this show broadcast on Memorial day, 1980.

The VHS (SP) tape itself was found to be in excellent condition. While properly stored in a climate controlled environment it apparently had not been played in decades. Great care has been taken to make the digital transfer."

Uploaded by "willg550187415" on 8 Oct 2009

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1973Alfred Hitchcockblack humourBritishBritish directorBritish film director • cameo appearance • chat show • cinemacinema historycinema pioneerfamous peoplefamous personalitiesfilmfilm directorhistorical figureshistory of cinemainnovatorinterview • lost tapes • pioneerpractitioner interview • suspense • talk show • television interview • Tom Snyder • Tomorrow Show with Tom Snyder • TVVHS

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JUNE 2012

BBC Academy TV Fast Train: the future of TV

"Predictions are problematic... but that didn't stop our expert panel of programme makers, technologists and digital strategists from peering into the future and speculating wildly about the shape of things to come. How will Technology influence TV in one, three and five years time? How will audiences be sharing, engaging with and reacting to TV content across news, sport and drama? How will broadcasters be measuring success, and what revenue streams will be funding TV in one, three and five years?"

(BBC Academy, 2012)

1). "TVFT: the future of TV", (32.00MB – Audio). This is a recording of a masterclass from the BBC Academy's TV Fast Train event held on 16 May 2012. Maggie Philbin hosts this masterclass about the the shape of things to come. She is joined by Peter Barron, head of PR at Google, Nick Newman, digital strategist and consultant and former head of BBC Journalism Products within the Future Media department, Daniel Danker general manager of programmes on demand and Peter Cassidy, director at FremantleMedia UK Interactive.
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TAGS

2012advances in technologyBBC • BBC Academy • BBC journalism • College of Production • download • FremantleMedia UK Interactive • future • future media • future of TV • Google (GOOG) • Google TV • new technology • PoD (acronym) • podcastpredictions • programmes on demand • technology • technology predictions • technology touches everythingtelevisionthe futureTV • TV Fast Train • TVFT

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 APRIL 2012

An American Family: the genesis of reality television

"Unlike most documentaries of its day, An American Family had no host, no interviews, and almost no voice–over narration. Producer Craig Gilbert presented the family's daily life – as captured by filmmakers Alan Raymond behind the camera, and Susan Raymond covering sound – in the style of cinéma vérité. It was the most controversial and talked–about television program of its era.

PBS was then a fledgling 'fourth network' joining CBS, NBC and ABC, and despite its non–commercial profile was looking for blockbuster hits, according to Bill Kobin, Vice President for programming at NET at the time. In the course of its 12 week run, An American Family riveted the country and drew in a record 10 million viewers a week. In the years since it was first broadcast, the series has become the subject of lengthy articles and reviews, including panel discussions with anthropologist Margaret Mead, who speculated that An American Family could be the beginning of a new way to explore the complexities of contemporary reality, 'maybe as important for our time as were the invention of drama and the novel for earlier generations.'

Now, 40 years since filming, the original filmmakers have edited a new 2–hour feature–length special capturing the most memorable and compelling moments of the landmark series. See for yourself why An American Family is one of the 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time (TV Guide, 2002)."

Public Broadcasting Service (PBS)

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197119721973 • Alan Raymond • American family lifeAn American Family • Bill Kobin • Bill Loud • cinema verite • contemporary reality • Craig Gilbert • cultural anthropologydaily life • Delilah Loud • direct cinemadocumentaryethnographic filmfamilyfamily lifefly-on-the-wall • Grant Loud • Kevin Loud • Lance Loud • landmark series • Loud family • Margaret Mead • Michele Loud • non-commercialnon-fiction televisionNorth Americaobservational seriesobservational style • Pat Loud • PBSportrait of a familyportrait of family lifereal behaviourrealityreality televisionsocial reality • Susan Raymond • televisiontelevision documentarytelevision programmetelevision series • The Louds • The Raymonds • TV • video verite • visual anthropology • WNET

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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