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24 JANUARY 2015

Bud Caddell: Complexity and the Future of Advertising

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2011advertisingadvertising strategyAustronesian cultures • brand partnerships • brand refresh • bucket brigade • Bud Caddell • building resilience • business modelcollaborationcomplex systemscomplexityconvergent thinkingcreative ideascreativity • design for creativity • digital agencydivergent thinkingeducation systemhaving original ideas that have valueKen Robinsonmarketing strategy • Mawken people • Moken people • Morgan people • nomadic people • non-conformity • predicting the futureproblem-solvingproduct innovation • rapid response • rethinking strategies • sea people • sea-based culture • self-organising teamsthinking skills • tomorrows challenges • tsunami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JUNE 2013

The World's Loveliest Advertisement For Death

"Funeral homes are purposely dour, all subdued blacks, hushed grays, and buffed dark cherry wood. It would seem that design flourishes have no part to play in this (non)aesthetic. In Japan, in fact, it's taboo to break this monochromatic code. But a new advertisment for Nishinihon Tenrei funeral parlor goes against the grain.

Produced by ad agency I&S BBDO, the life–sized poster depicts a human skeleton recreated in colorful flower petals set on an arresting white background. Kneecaps are made from sunflowers, links of green leaves trace out rib cages, and arched rows of pink roses form the silhouette of the crown of a skull.

The poster, which recently took home a One Show Design Merit Award, was the brainchild of Mari Nishimura, creative director at I&S BBDO. The idea for the image came from his own experience with death, he tells Co. Design. Nishimura was left with 'profound feelings' of his late father's funeral, which, incidentally enough, was held at the Nishinihon Tenrei funeral parlor."

(Sammy Medina, 29 May 2013, Co.Design)

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advertisment • art directionBBDOcollagecolourdeathdevastating tsunamisflowersfuneral • funeral home • funeral parlour • human skeletonillustrative styleJapanJapanese • Mari Nishimura • Nishinihon Tenrei • One Show Design • petals • posterremembranceskeletontsunami

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 JANUARY 2013

Tsunami: The Survivors' Stories

"Six months on from one of the world's most devastating tsunamis, Panorama returns to Japan to hear remarkable tales of survival amid the epic destruction. Piecing together new footage of the wave, reporter Paul Kenyon tells the dramatic stories of those who managed to escape when so many did not. The film also follows those returning briefly to homes abandoned within the radioactive no–go area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant, and asks what the future holds for the thousands affected."

(BBC One – Panorama)

First Broadcast 18 September 2011 20:30 BBC News Channel, length 29 minutes.

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2011abandoned houseBBC Onebuildings • collapsed buildings • cooling system failure • deathdestructiondevastating tsunamis • dramatic stories • earthquakeescape • evacuated • Fukushima • Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant • Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Plant • injured • Japan • Japanese National Police Agency • meltdown • missing people • natural disaster • no-go area • nuclear disaster • nuclear power plant • nuclear power station • Oshika Peninsula • Pacific coast • Panorama (TV) • Paul Kenyon • radioactivesurvivalsurvivor • Tohoku • Tohoku earthquake • tsunamiwave

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 AUGUST 2005

After Universal Grand Narratives: shared narratives, narrative flows

"global communications has made commonly shared narrative more possible now than in the past. Think of the rolling celebration of the millennium in the year 2000 from Kiribati around the world to the mid–Pacific on our televisions. The mobilisation of sentiment through those same media, be it at the death of Diana, Princess of Wales; the views on the Middle East from Al–Jezeera; or the devastating effects of the 2004 tsunami in the Indian Ocean have created shared narratives that were not possible before the information era. To be sure, viewers of these spectacles and reportage are not passive agents; they can construct meaning at local levels that elude the control of the meaning makers. One should more properly speak here of narrative flows, that is, chains of locally constructed and transmitted narratives that are at once mutually intelligible, yet reflect concrete circumstances in local communities. Such flows have been in evidence in the social forces of globalisation since the mid–1990s, and are becoming more prevalent today. These flows may well represent as close as we may come to an explicitly 'universal' – be it socially or in [belief in spirituality] – in our complex and interconnected times."

(Robert J. Schreiter, p.14)

2). Schreiter, R. J. (2005). "A New Modernity: Living and Believing in an Unstable World". The Anthony Jordan Lectures, Newman Theological College, Edmonton Alberta, March 18–19, 2005 p.14. http://www.mission–preciousblood.org/Docsfiles/schreiter_new_modernity.pdf (Accessed 10 August 2005).

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Al-Jezeera • cohesive narrativescommunicationscommunitycosmopolitanism • Diana Windsor • flowflowsglobalglobalisationinterconnectedlocal storiesmediamillenniumnarrative • narrative flows • new modernity • Princess of Wales • reflexive modernisationreflexive modernityRobert Schreitersecond modernitysharedspace of flowstelevisiontsunami
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