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Which clippings match 'Purposive Selection' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JULY 2013

Qualitative Research: systematic observations of social behaviour with no preconceived hypotheses to be tested

"Qualitative research is concerned with nonstatistical methods of inquiry and analysis of social phenomena. It draws on an inductive process in which themes and categories emerge through analysis of data collected by such techniques as interviews, observations, videotapes, and case studies. Samples are usually small and are often purposively selected. Qualitative research uses detailed descriptions from the perspective of the research participants themselves as a means of examining specific issues and problems under study.

Qualitative research differs from quantitative research in that the latter is characterized by the use of large samples, standardized measures, a deductive approach, and highly structured interview instruments to collect data for hypothesis testing (Marlow, 1993). In contrast to qualitative research, in quantitative research easily quantifiable categories are typically generated before the study and statistical techniques are used to analyze the data collected. Both qualitative and quantitative research are designed to build knowledge; they can be used as complementary strategies."

(Ruth McRoy)

TAGS

ild knowledge • case studies • Christine Marlow • complementary strategies • data collection and analysisdeductive reasoning • descriptive validity reliability • detailed descriptions • enquiry and analysis • hypothesis testinginductive procedures • inductive process • large samples • nonstatistical methods • observations • problems under study • purposive selection • qualitative and quantitative research • qualitative research • quantifiable categories • quantitative researchresearch interview • research participants • Ruth McRoy • social phenomena • standardised measures • statistical techniques • structured interviews • themes and categories emerge • video (research method)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2013

Purposive / judgmental / selective / subjective research sampling

"To say you will engage in purposive sampling signifies that you see sampling as a series of strategic choices about with whom, where and how to do your research. Two things are implicit in that statement. First is that the way that you sample has to be tied to your objectives. Second is an implication that follows from the first, i.e., that there is no one 'best' sampling strategy because which is 'best' will depend on the context in which you are working and the nature of your research objective(s).

Purposive sampling is virtually synonymous with qualitative research. However, because there are many objectives that qualitative researchers might have, the list of 'purposive' strategies that you might follow is virtually endless, and any given list will reflect only the range of situations the author of that list has considered."

(Ted Palys, 2008)

Palys, T. (2008). "Purposive Sampling". The SAGE Encyclopedia of Qualitative Research Methods. Lisa M. Given. London, SAGE Publications, Inc. 1&2.

TAGS

criterion sampling • critical case sampling • deviant case sampling • disconfirming case sampling • extreme case sampling • judgement of the researcher • judgmental sampling • maximum variation sampling • negative case sampling • non-probability sampling • non-probability sampling technique • paradigmatic case sampling • purposive sampling • purposive selection • purposive strategies • qualitative research • qualitative researchers • researchresearch design • research objectives • sample sizesampling • sampling strategy • sampling techniques • selective sampling • stakeholder sampling • strategic choices • subjective sampling • Ted Palys • theory-guided sampling • typical case sampling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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