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Which clippings match 'Ralph Hotere' keyword pg.1 of 1
07 AUGUST 2016

1974 documentary about Aotearoa New Zealand artist Ralph Hotere

"Directed by Sam Pillsbury, this 1974 film observes Ralph Hotere — one of New Zealand's greatest artists — at a moment when excitement is gathering about his work. Lauded as a 'classic' by Ian Wedde, the documentary is framed around the execution of a watershed piece: a large mural Hotere was commissioned to paint for Hamilton's Founders Theatre. Interviews with friends and associates — poets Hone Tuwhare and Bill Manhire, art critics, officials and dealers — are intercut with fascinating shots of Hotere working (including making art by photocopying or 'xerography')."

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TAGS

197420th century artabstract artists • Ad Reinhardt • Aotearoa New Zealandart critics • art dealer • art documentary • art historian • artist • Barry Lett • Bill Manhire • Brian Shennan • David Fowler • Dunedinfine art • Founders Theatre • geometric abstraction • Gordon Brown (art historian) • Hamilton • Hone Tuwhare • Ian Wedde • Jack Body • John Scott • Land Wars • Landfall (literary journal) • Lynton Diggle • MaorimuralNew Zealand artistNew Zealand on ScreenNZ Film ArchiveNZ On Screenpainting • photocopying • Port ChalmersRalph Hotere • Rodney Kirk-Smith • Roger Collins • Sam Pillsbury • spray painting • Te Aupouri • Te Rarawa • visual artist • xerography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2013

Ralph Hotere, New Zealand Artist, Dies at 81

Ralph Hotere 1931–2013 "was one of New Zealand's leading abstract artists, well known for his enigmatic, black painted surfaces stripped with luminous lines of color. He was not a strict formalist or wary of content. When an aluminium smelter was proposed for the Aramoana wetland, he famously nailed protest works on local telephone poles, painted on corrugated iron. And although his message was never explicit, his black paintings emerged at the height of the Civil Rights movement and suggested themes of historical crisis: war, nuclear testing, the Cuban Missile Crisis and Apartheid. With an understated gravitas unusual in protest art, Hotere demanded that his work speak for itself.

Although Hotere did not want to be pigeonholed as a 'Māori artist,' his works were steeped in the spiritual world of his ancestors. He was one of the first generation of Māori artists in New Zealand who, with quiet perseverance, forged a path for subsequent generations of artists by establishing a distinctive visual vocabulary that would be influential to both Māori and Pakeha (European) artists alike."

(Andrew Clifford, 1 March 2013, ArtAsiaPacific Magazine)

Fig.1 Ralph Hotere with his Black Phoenix installation at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery in 2000. Photo by Stephen Jaquiery.

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TAGS

201320th century artabstract artists • aluminium smelter • Aotearoa New ZealandAramoanaartist • Black Phoenix (artwork) • Careys Bay • deceased • distinctive visual vocabulary • Dunedin • Dunedin Public Art Gallery • funeral • humble origins • Maori • Mitimiti • New Zealand artist • New Zealand cultural identity • Order of New Zealand • paintingsPakehaPort Chalmersprotestprotest artprotest worksRalph Hotere • significant figure • South Island • tangi • the spiritual world of ancestors • the work speaks for itself • visual artist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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