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Which clippings match 'New Zealand Artist' keyword pg.1 of 3
07 AUGUST 2016

1974 documentary about Aotearoa New Zealand artist Ralph Hotere

"Directed by Sam Pillsbury, this 1974 film observes Ralph Hotere — one of New Zealand's greatest artists — at a moment when excitement is gathering about his work. Lauded as a 'classic' by Ian Wedde, the documentary is framed around the execution of a watershed piece: a large mural Hotere was commissioned to paint for Hamilton's Founders Theatre. Interviews with friends and associates — poets Hone Tuwhare and Bill Manhire, art critics, officials and dealers — are intercut with fascinating shots of Hotere working (including making art by photocopying or 'xerography')."

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197420th century artabstract artists • Ad Reinhardt • Aotearoa New Zealandart critics • art dealer • art documentary • art historian • artist • Barry Lett • Bill Manhire • Brian Shennan • David Fowler • Dunedinfine art • Founders Theatre • geometric abstraction • Gordon Brown (art historian) • Hamilton • Hone Tuwhare • Ian Wedde • Jack Body • John Scott • Land Wars • Landfall (literary journal) • Lynton Diggle • MaorimuralNew Zealand artistNew Zealand on ScreenNZ Film ArchiveNZ On Screenpainting • photocopying • Port ChalmersRalph Hotere • Rodney Kirk-Smith • Roger Collins • Sam Pillsbury • spray painting • Te Aupouri • Te Rarawa • visual artist • xerography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 DECEMBER 2014

Daniel Crooks: digital divisionism and image transposition

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ACMI • ACMI (Australian Centre for the Moving Image) • Anna Schwartz Gallery • Aotearoa New Zealand • Auckland Institute of Technology • Brothers Quay • chronophotography • computational imaging • Daniel Crooksdivisionism • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco • flatbed scanner • hand-held scanner • Hastings • image stretchingJan Svankmajermotion studiesNew Zealand artistphotocopy • post camera imaging • scanningslit-scan • spatial distortion • tai chi • time as spacetime-motion studiestrain • transposition • Victorian College of the Artsvideo and digital artvideo artistvisual spectacleZbigniew Rybczynski

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 MARCH 2013

Ralph Hotere, New Zealand Artist, Dies at 81

Ralph Hotere 1931–2013 "was one of New Zealand's leading abstract artists, well known for his enigmatic, black painted surfaces stripped with luminous lines of color. He was not a strict formalist or wary of content. When an aluminium smelter was proposed for the Aramoana wetland, he famously nailed protest works on local telephone poles, painted on corrugated iron. And although his message was never explicit, his black paintings emerged at the height of the Civil Rights movement and suggested themes of historical crisis: war, nuclear testing, the Cuban Missile Crisis and Apartheid. With an understated gravitas unusual in protest art, Hotere demanded that his work speak for itself.

Although Hotere did not want to be pigeonholed as a 'Māori artist,' his works were steeped in the spiritual world of his ancestors. He was one of the first generation of Māori artists in New Zealand who, with quiet perseverance, forged a path for subsequent generations of artists by establishing a distinctive visual vocabulary that would be influential to both Māori and Pakeha (European) artists alike."

(Andrew Clifford, 1 March 2013, ArtAsiaPacific Magazine)

Fig.1 Ralph Hotere with his Black Phoenix installation at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery in 2000. Photo by Stephen Jaquiery.

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201320th century artabstract artists • aluminium smelter • Aotearoa New ZealandAramoanaartist • Black Phoenix (artwork) • Careys Bay • deceased • distinctive visual vocabulary • Dunedin • Dunedin Public Art Gallery • funeral • humble origins • Maori • Mitimiti • New Zealand artist • New Zealand cultural identity • Order of New Zealand • paintingsPakehaPort Chalmersprotestprotest artprotest worksRalph Hotere • significant figure • South Island • tangi • the spiritual world of ancestors • the work speaks for itself • visual artist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Joyce Campbell's Garden of Ambrotype Peculiarities

"L.A. Botanical is, specifically, a series of ambrotypes, an early form of photography, invented in 1850, the same year that the City of Los Angeles was incorporated as a municipality. At the time, the population comprised a mere 1,610 hardy souls. The population explosion of the following 150 years into the Los Angeles we know today resembles (from an imaginary aerial vantage point) an algal bloom, or bacterial inflorescence[ii]–the visible record of a natural imbalance

Ambrotypes are negative images on glass plates which, when shown against a black backdrop, appear to be positive. The name comes from the Greek ambrotos, 'immortal', a rather poetic way of evoking the power of photography to fix forever the fragile moment. Plants, particularly flowers, have long been the favorite metaphor of poets, painters, and now photographers for the passage of time–they are our most consistent reminder of mortality, and yet our most frequent solace at times of bereavement.

Though the ambrotype predates early moving pictures, Campbell's use of antique photography can't help but remind viewers of its sister medium, film, and the attendant connection with Los Angeles as a national and global 'dream factory' (or, indeed, that these technologies played their part in swelling the population of the fledgling city). Campbell's humble backyard blooms become, in L.A. Botanical, stars. The silver nitrate of the photographic process is linked, chemically and etymologically, to the silver screens onto which early films were projected. Campbell's botanical 'immortals' have been bequeathed eternal 'limelight' (another chemical process which, due to its use in theatrical lighting, is forever associated with fame)."

(Tessa Laird, 2006–2007)

Fig.1 "Black Walnut, Antifungal, anti–parasitic, antiseptic, herbicide and hair dye. To treat thrush, candida, ringworm and internal parasites. Ellagic acid and Juglone are being investigated as cancer treatments."

Fig.2 "Turpentine, From Ponderosa Pine, Paint thinner, solvent, liniment, antiseptic and treatment for lice and tapeworm."

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1850 • ambrotype • antique photography • Aotearoa New ZealandartistAucklandblackbotanical • chemical process • City of Los Angeles • creative practice • fix forever • flowers • fragile moment • fragility • glass plate • immortal • Joyce Campbell • L.A. Botanical • Los Angelesmetaphormomentmoving pictures • negatives • New Zealand artistpassage of timephotographer • photographic process • photographyplantplant information • silver nitrate • specimenstasisstill life photography • visible record • visual spectaclewoman photographer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 JULY 2011

Com­pos­ing motion: Len Lye's kinetic sculptures

"The poten­tial to be moved by move­ment was Lye's motive force – he con­ceived his sculp­tures as per­formers rather than objects. Hor­rocks sug­gests Lye might have reframed Descartes' dictum by declar­ing 'I move, there­fore I am', and para­phrased Archibald MacLeish's 'A poem should not mean / But be' with 'A film should not mean / But move'.

How much atten­tion do design­ers give to 'com­pos­ing motion' through the way their cre­ations move and /or the way people are made to move, and be moved, as they inter­act with them? Lye's prose included at least two explor­a­tions of bod­ily feel­ings and phys­ical sen­sa­tions around chairs."

(Michael Smythe, 22 March 2010, Prodesign)

Fig.1 A clip from Flip and Two Twisters a documentary about Len Lye the New Zealand born kinetic artist and filmmaker. Directed by Shirley Horrocks.

Fig.2 The kin­etic sculp­ture Uni­verse. The striker ball is sus­pen­ded above the steel loop, which has just rolled over to one side. Photo Brian East­wood. Cour­tesy Len Lye Foundation.

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Aotearoa New Zealand • Archibald MacLeish • bod­ily feel­ings • com­pos­ing motion • design formalism • design­er • kinetic artkinetic forcekinetic sculptorkinetic sculptureLen Lye • motive force • move­ment • movementNew Zealand artistobjects • per­formers • phys­ical sen­sa­tions • physicsRene Descartes • Roger Hor­rocks • sculpture • Shirley Horrocks • sound sculpturetension

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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