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Which clippings match 'Wyndham Lewis' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 MAY 2015

Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19

"Established in 1913 by the painter and influential art critic Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective, whose members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and other artists of the Bloomsbury Group.

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega)."

(The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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TAGS

1913 • 1919 • Alvaro Guevara • art movement • avant-garde art movement • Bloomsbury Group • bold new designs • British designceramicsclothing design • Cuthbert Hamilton • decorative artsdesign collectivedesign history • design of domestic products • Duncan Grant • Edward McKnight Kauffer • Edward Morgan ForsterEdward Wadsworth • Edward Wolfe • Frederick Etchells • furniture designGeorge Bernard Shaw • Gertrude Stein • Henri Gaudier-Brzeska • home furnishingsinterior design • Israel Zangwill • Jesse Etchells • Lady Ian Hamilton • Lady Maud Cunard • Lady Ottoline Morrell • linen design • linocutlithography • Mikhail Larionov • mosaicnew approaches • Nina Hamnett • Omega artists • Omega Workshops • painted furniture • painted murals • painted silks and linens • Pamela Diamand • Roger Fry • rug • Somerset House • stained glasstablewaretextile design • The Courtauld Institute of Art • upholstery • Vanessa Bell • vibrant abstract design • Virginia WoolfWilliam Butler Yeats • Winifred Gill • woodblock prints • woven wools • Wyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

The Vorticists: a short-lived 20th century avant garde art movement

"The vorticists did not have many members; nor did the movement last long, because of unfortunate timing – it formed in 1914 as Europe hurtled towards war. By 1918 there was not much appetite for dogmatic groups such as theirs.

Nevertheless, the group holds an important place in 20th–century British art history.

'They were the first abstract modernist group in Britain,' said Stephens. 'It inevitably comes out of the revolution of cubism, but then, so does everything in the 20th century.'

They were part of a maelstrom of new, aggressive art 'ism' movements, not least the one practised by the Italian futurists, who were, in Lewis's eyes, the bad guys.

Stephens said: 'Unlike the futurists, who celebrate the energy of the machine and actual war as a purging force, the vorticists were engaged in more universal ideas of identity, time and movement in a philosophical sense.'"

(Mark Brown, 13 June 2011, The Guardian)

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1914 • 20th century • abstract modernist group • aggressive art • Alvin Langdon Coburn • angular shapesart exhibitionart movementavant-garde • Blast (journal) • British art • cometism • cubismcubist and abstract art • David Bomberg • disruptive pattern • Dore Gallery • Dorothy Shakespear • Edward Wadsworth • Ezra Pound • Futurism (art movement)Hayward Gallery • Helen Saunders • ism • jazz rhythm • Lawrence Atkinson • maelstrom • Manifesto for a Modern World • movementpaintingpattern • Penguin Club • purging force • short-lived • Tate Britainthe energy of the machine • universal ideas • universal modernity • vanished works • visual abstractionvorticism • vorticists • William Robertswomen artistswomen in art and designWorld War IWyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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