Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Sky' keyword pg.1 of 1
04 NOVEMBER 2015

Light projection works by American artist James Turrell

"For over half a century, the American artist James Turrell has worked directly with light and space to create artworks that engage viewers with the limits and wonder of human perception. ...

Turrell often cites the Parable of Plato's Cave to introduce the notion that we are living in a reality of our own creation, subject to our human sensory limitations as well as contextual and cultural norms. This is evident in Turrell's over eighty Skyspaces, chambers with an aperture in the ceiling open to the sky. The simple act of witnessing the sky from within a Turrell Skyspace, notably at dawn and dusk, reveals how we internally create the colors we see and thus, our perceived reality. ...

Turrell's medium is pure light. He says, 'My work has no object, no image and no focus. With no object, no image and no focus, what are you looking at? You are looking at you looking. What is important to me is to create an experience of wordless thought.'"

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

TAGS

aesthetic experienceallegory of the cavechamber • childhood fascination • colour and lightcolour fieldcolour light • colour projection • design formalismflat colourformalist design aestheticsgeometric primitive • high-intensity projector • human sensory limitations • immaterialityimmersive experienceimmersive works • interior and exterior spaces • James Turrelllarge scale worklightlight and spacelight artlight projectionlight works • no focus • no image • no object • non-representationalNorth American artistop art • open sky spaces • perceptual psychology • physical presence of lightpresence • projection pieces • projection works • pure light • sensory form • sky • skyspaces • visual abstraction • wordless thought

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2015

Hindu Creation Stories

"Most religions have a single creation story. Hinduism has many. This is because for Hindus there is no single creation, but periodic cycles of creation. The universe we live in is one of innumerable universes. Narrated by Gillian Anderson. Scripted by Nigel Warburton."

(BBC Radio 4)

1
2

TAGS

Ananta Sesha • BBC Radio 4belief • Bra (deity) • Brahma • Brahma (god) • Brahman • bull • calf • cobra • Cognitive • cowcreation narrative • creation stories • creation story • Creator Beingsdarkness • deity • Earth • Gillian Anderson • godsheavenHindu • Hinduism • Hindusim • history of ideashorse • innumerable universes • lotus flower • mare • meditationmultiplicityNigel Warburtonnothingnessorigin myth • periodic cycles of creation • religionserpent • Shiva (god) • skyspirituality • The Open University • universe • Vishnu (deity)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 APRIL 2014

Positive and negative spaces form a skyline photo-alphabet

"Berlin–based photographer and illustrator Lisa Rienermann created this unique font out of buildings and blue skies while studying at the University of Duisburg–Essen; it was awarded a certificate of typographic excellence by the Type Directors Club New York back in 2007. 'It began with the 'Q,'' she has explained. 'I was in a kind of courtyard in Barcelona. I looked upward and saw houses, the blue sky and clouds. The more I looked, I saw that the houses formed a letter Q.' Click through for a better look at some of the letters."

(Caroline Stanley, 23 February 2011)

Fig.1 Lisa Rienermann (2007). "Type The Sky".

1

TAGS

2007alphabetBarcelonablue sky • building silhouettes • buildings and environmentsbuilt environmentcityscapecloud • compositional framing • compositional strategies • courtyard • editing through selectionexperimental type design • framing space • groupingletterform • letters in the landscape • Lisa Rienermann • negative spaceoutlineperceptual organisation • photoalphabet • photographic alphabet • photographic selection • positive space • selective framing • shapessilhouetteskyskylinetype • Type Directors Club • Type The Sky (2007) • typefacetypography • University of Duisburg-Essen • visual abstractionvisual approach • visual framing • visual similarity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2014

Interactive billboards that drop angels on your head

"There you are in the middle of the city, traffic all around, planes buzzing above and you notice a little boy on a giant screen pointing up. 'Look,' says the boy. And you look, and the on–screen boy is pointing at an actual plane flying in the sky. He knows its flight number, its destination. This is no joke. That is flight BA475 from Barcelona! He tracks its path with his little hand, and then, when the plane is gone, he dashes off. This is a British Airways display ad in London's Piccadilly Circus, and it's using to identify actual planes in the actual sky.

Digital billboards are stepping up their game. They are becoming . There's another stunning example at Euston Station (also in London) that shows a man furiously screaming at a woman who is clearly frightened. But you can help. If you have a cellphone, you can yank the man clear across the station, dragging him from screen to screen to screen until he's way on the other side of the terminal.

I've got one more. This time it's a fantasy experience available to anyone who steps into a marked spot in the middle of Victoria Station. (London's a happening place for billboard experimentation.) Once you're there, a holographic angel drops down from heaven and lands beside you. You can't see her in real space, but you and she are plainly visible on a screen that everybody in the station can see, and you are free to interact anyway you please."

(Robert Krulwich, 04 January 2014, NPR)

1
2
3

TAGS

2014advertising in public spacesaeroplaneangelawareness raisingbillboardboy • British Airways • cellphonecreative advertising • cute girl • digital billboardsdigital displaysdigital screens • display ad • domestic violence • e-motion screens • Euston Station • experience design • fantasy experience • flight number • flying • frighten • furious • get involvedholograph • interactive billboard • interactive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • intervene • JCDecaux • London Victoria • Lynx Excite • manmobile phone • National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) • NPROgilvy Group UK • Piccadilly Circus • pointing • public spacescream • screen to screen • sky • surveillance technology • train station • Victoria Station • visual communicationwoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

1

2

3

4

5

TAGS

1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.