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Which clippings match 'Concealment' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JANUARY 2014

The Online Disinhibition Effect: the psychology of online oversharing

"Sometimes people reveal suppressed emotions, fears, and wishes; they show unusual acts of kindness and generosity, or go out of their way to help others. We may call this 'benign disinhibition.' On the other hand, people may be rude, critical, angry, hateful, and threatening, or they visit places of perversion, crime, and violence – territory they would never explore in the 'real' world. We may call this 'toxic disinhibition.'"

(John Suler, p.184)

Suler, J. (2005). "The Online Disinhibition Effect." International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies 2(2).

Fig.1 Katie Shimel "Very Sad Right Now" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3q–dqAvIgI]

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TAGS

anonymity • asynchronicity • attenuated status • behaviour • benign disinhibition • catharsisconcealment • courage • cyberspacedetachmentdisclosure • disinhibition • disinhibition effect • dissociative anonymity • dissociative imagination • I share therefore I amidentity performance • intrapsychic world • introjected character • introjection • invisibility • John Suler • minimisation of authority • narcissismnormalising over-sharing • offline identity • online behaviour • online disinhibition • online disinhibition effect • online environment • outpouringsoversharingpersonal identitypersonal performancepsychepsychoanalysis • psychological presence • psychologyreal world • self-boundaries • self-disclosing • self-disclosure • solipsistic introjection • superego • suppressed emotions • text communication • toxic disinhibition • transference expectations • true self • typed-text conversation • unusual acts • wishes and needs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

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TAGS

1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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