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29 SEPTEMBER 2013

Handmade in Britain: The Story of Wallpaper

"In the second programme in the series, presenter Paul Martin reveals the secret history of wallpaper from the 17th century to the present day.

The film explores how wallpaper, seemingly so fragile and easy to replace, provides a vital index of changing tastes in the home. The programme shows how from its earliest days wallpaper imitated other, more costly wall coverings: from the 17th–century papers that were designed to look like embroidered textiles to 18th–century flocked wallpapers. The latter, intended as a cheaper substitute for costly damasks or velvets, became a triumph of British innovation, coming to grace the grandest of state apartments and country house interiors.

Focussing on how wallpaper was actually made, the programme goes onto explore how it became one of the battlefields in discussions about design in the 19th century. For, although technological innovations in machine printing had allowed manufacturers to print elaborate designs with complex colour–ways, some commentators were shocked by the poor aesthetic quality of British wallpapers. The programme looks at how designers and reformers attempted to take the situation in hand: from 'The False Principles of Design', an exhibition organised by Sir Henry Cole, the first Director of the Victoria and Albert Museum, which sought to instruct the British public in good and bad design; to the pioneering work of Augustus Pugin and William Morris.

Finally, the film traces the fortunes of wallpaper in the 20th century. Patterned walls faced stiff competition from the purity of plain, painted or whitewashed walls, as advocated by modernists like Le Corbusier. However, new techniques, like screen–printing, allowed shorter runs of innovate wallpapers, which were aimed at architects and interior designers. And, as Paul Martin discovers, wallpaper is still flourishing at the beginning of the 21st century. A combination of digital printing, screen–printing and hand–printing allows companies, like Timorous Beasties, to produce exciting new designs.

Presented by Paul Martin, contributors include Christine Woods, Anthony Wells–Cole, Martha Armitage, Allyson McDermott and Paul Simmons (Timorous Beasties), as well as V&A experts."

First broadcast on 25 September 2013 on BBC Four as part of the Handmade in Britain series [http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03bm1rg].

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TAGS

16th century17th century18th century19th century20th century21st century • Allyson McDermott • Anthony Wells-Cole • antiqueart and craftsArts and Crafts Movement • Augustus Pugin • bad design • BBC Four • changing tastes • Christine Woods • colourways • damask • deluxe item • design craftdigital printingdomestic material object • elaborate designs • embroidered textiles • flock wallpaper • good design • hand-printing • Handmade in Britain (series) • Henry Cole • industrial grime • interior design • interior designer • interior stylingLe Corbusierluxury • machine printing • makersmanufacturing technology • Marthe Armitage • Palladio Wallpapers • pattern • Paul Martin • Paul Simmons • poisonprinting processscreenprinting • stately homes • technological innovation • The False Principles of Design • Timorous Beasties • two-up-two-down • velvetVictoria and Albert Museum • wall coverings • wallpaperwallpaper design • wallpapering • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2013

UK National Society for Education in Art and Design

"The NSEAD's origins can be traced to 1888, when a group of art school principals recognised the need to raise the standard of art teaching and improve the status of art teachers. They founded the Society of Art Masters, which became the National Society of Art Masters early in the last century. In 1899 HRH Edward Prince of Wales became Honorary President of the Society and in 1901, as King Edward VII, he became the SAM's patron. This link with the throne lapsed upon the death of King George V in 1936.

With the development of art and crafts as part of general education, and the appointment of men and women as full–time specialist art teachers in schools, the membership was extended and, in 1944, the Society adopted the title National Society for Art Education.

Another strand of the Society's history concerns the Society for Education through Art which grew out of a framework of an institute for exploring new ideas in art and education, proposed by Henry Moore, Eric Gill, Sir Herbert Read and Alexander Barclay Russell.

The SEA itself was formed in 1940 by the amalgamation of the Art Teacher's Guild and the New Society of Art Teachers. After two years of negotiations the SEA and the NSAE merged their interests to become the National Society for Education in Art and Design in 1984. In 1995 the Association of Centres for Art and Design Teacher Education decided to merge with the Society and a Teacher Education Board was established to serve the special interests of this group. The NSAE launched the Journal of Art & Design Education (now the International Journal of Art & Design Education) in 1982 with Henry Moore as its founding patron. The Society established The Athene Trust in 1996.

Professor Sir Christopher Frayling was appointed patron of the Society in May 2002. He was joined by Sir John and Lady Frances Sorrell and by Sir Nicholas Serota in 2010 and by Professor Magdalene Odundo OBE in 2011.

In early 2009 A4, formerly the Association of Advisers and Inspectors of Art and Design took a decision to merge its interests with those of the NSEAD. The process of convergence was completed with the full implementation of a revised constitution and rules on 1st January 2010. Among other changes this merger led to the creation of an on–line special focus group for advisers, inspectors, consultants, advanced skills teachers (ASTs) and others with a particular interest in school improvement issues."

TAGS

1888 • Alexander Russell • art and craftsart and educationart school • art teachers • Art Teachers Guild • art teaching • Association of Advisers and Inspectors of Art and Design • Association of Centres for Art and Design Teacher Education • AST • Christopher Frayling • Eric Gill • Frances Sorrell • general education • Henry Moore • Herbert Read • International Journal of Art and Design Education • John Sorrell • Journal of Art and Design Education • Magdalene Odundo • National Society for Art Education • National Society for Education in Art and Design • National Society of Art Masters • New Society of Art Teachers • Nicholas Serota • NSAE • NSEAD • SAM (acronym) • schools • SEA (acronym) • Society for Education through Art • Society of Art Masters • special interests group • Teacher Education Board • The Athene Trust • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2006

Collaborative Design: V&A - Design A Tile

"Visitors have been encouraged to become more involved with the V&A website through a number of projects. This demonstration will focus on four of the more interactive elements of the site. Some of these features have already proved to be very popular, others are still in the trial stages – all of them provide excellent scope for further development.

Design a Tile interactive
This Flash interactive was an extremely popular part of an Arts and Crafts exhibition microsite. Users are able to design their own tiles by adding and manipulating patterns and defining colour schemes through an intuitive Flash interface. Finished tile designs are added to a gallery and, crucially, users are encouraged to comment on each other's creations."

(Toby Travis, Victoria & Albert Museum: Archives & Museum Informatics)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Mia Thornton
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