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Which clippings match 'Video Artwork' keyword pg.1 of 2
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Technology/Transformation: Wonder Woman by Dara Birnbaum

"Explosive bursts of fire open Technology/Transformation, an incendiary deconstruction of the ideology embedded in television form and pop cultural iconography. Appropriating imagery from the 1970s TV series Wonder Woman, Birnbaum isolates and repeats the moment of the 'real' woman's symbolic transformation into super-hero. Entrapped in her magical metamorphosis by Birnbaum's stuttering edits, Wonder Woman spins dizzily like a music-box doll. Through radical manipulation of this female Pop icon, she subverts its meaning within the television text. Arresting the flow of images through fragmentation and repetition, Birnbaum condenses the comic-book narrative — Wonder Woman deflects bullets off her bracelets, 'cuts' her throat in a hall of mirrors — distilling its essence to allow the subtext to emerge. In a further textual deconstruction, she spells out the words to the song Wonder Woman in Discoland on the screen. The lyrics' double entendres ('Get us out from under... Wonder Woman') reveal the sexual source of the superwoman's supposed empowerment: 'Shake thy Wonder Maker.' Writing about the 'stutter-step progression of 'extended moments' of transformation from Wonder Woman,' Birnbaum states, 'The abbreviated narrative — running, spinning, saving a man — allows the underlying theme to surface: psychological transformation versus television product. Real becomes Wonder in order to 'do good' (be moral) in an (a) or (im)moral society.'"

(Electronic Arts Intermix)

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1970s1978 • abbreviated narrative • appropriationbracelet • comic book narrative • critical appropriation • cultural subversion • Dara Birnbaum • deconstruction • discoland • double entendre • Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) • extended moments • feminist artfeminist critiquefirefragmentation • hall of mirrors • incendiary device • influential video artists • magical metamorphosis • metamorphosis • music-box doll • pop cultural iconography • pop culture artpop icon • psychological transformation • radical manipulationrepeating formrepeating patternrepetitionrunning • saving a man • sexual empowerment • Sony Portapak • spinningstutter-step progressionstuttering editssubversion • super hero • symbolic transformation • Technology Transformation Wonder Woman (1978) • television form • television imagery • television product • television text • textual deconstruction • TV series • underlying theme • video artvideo artistvideo artwork • Wonder Woman (television programme)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 DECEMBER 2013

Under Scan: interactive video art installation for public space

"Under Scan is an interactive video art installation for public space. In the work, passers–by are detected by a computerized tracking system, which activates video–portraits projected within their shadow. Over one thousand video–portraits of volunteers were taken in Derby, Leicester, Lincoln, Northampton and Nottingham by a team of local filmmakers. For its London presentation in Trafalgar Square, Tate Modern filmed over 250 additional recordings. As people were free to portray themselves in whatever way they desired, a wide range of performances were captured. In the installation, the portraits appear at random locations. They 'wake–up' and establish eye contact with a viewer as soon as his or her shadow 'reveals' them. As the viewer walks away, the portrait reacts by looking away, and eventually disappears if no one activates it. ...

The piece was inspired by representation en abîme, where the portrayed make eye–contact with the viewer, – as found in works by Jan Van Eyck, Parmigianino, Velázquez or Leon Golub. Other references for this work include the post–photographic device described in La invención de Morel, written by Adolfo Bioy Casares (1940) and the ghostly portraits created by Gary Hill, Lynn Hershman–Leeson, Paul Sermon and Luc Courchesne."

(Rafael Lozano–Hemmer)

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2005 • Adolfo Bioy Casares • art installation • Bajo Reconocimiento • computerised surveillance system • DerbyDiego Velazquezeye contactfilming people • Francesco Mazzola • Gary Hill • ghostly portraits • ghosts • Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola • immersive experienceimmersive videointeractive installationinteractive video • interactive video art installation • Jan Van Eyck • La invencion de Morel • Leicester • Leon Golub • light installation • Lincoln • living picturesLuc Courchesne • Lynn Hershman-Leeson • mise-en-abyme • Morels Invention • Northampton • Nottingham • Pani 12kW projector • Parmigianino • Parmigiano • passer-by • Paul Sermon • post-photographic device • projection artprojection workspublic spaceRafael Lozano-Hemmer • representation en abime • robotic projectors • scissor lift • shadowTate Modern • The Invention of Morel • tracking system • Trafalgar Square • Under Scan (2005) • video artworkvideo portraitvideo projectionvideo projection worksvideo trackingwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2013

Universal Everything & Field: Deutsche Bank Hong Kong

"FIELD were invited by Universal Everything to bring their concepts to life using realtime code. A unique and unrepeatable experience amazes staff and guests every time they walk by this 12m wide screen installation at Deutsche Bank Hong Kong. The 8 ever–changing video artworks show atmospheric cityscapes, hand–drawn sceneries, patterns and landscape animations. All generated in realtime, passers–by are invited to discover new details every day."

(Marcus Wendt and Vera–Maria Glahn, 2010)

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20103D animationart of code • atmospheric cityscape • audiovisual • brand art • computational designdata visualisationDeutsche Bank • Deutsche Bank Hong Kong • Deutsche Bank Media Wall • digital print • digital screensexperience design • Field (collective) • financial datafinancial data visualisationgenerative designHong Konginteractive installation • landscape animations • Marcus Wendt • Matt Pyke • pattern • Pete Seaward • real-timerealtime animation • realtime code • realtime generated visualssite-specific visualisationUniversal Everything • Vera-Maria Glahn • video artwork

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 MARCH 2010

Liberty Hall building transformed into 50 metre, low resolution, TV screen

"From the 24th of September until the 11th of October 2009, the iconic Liberty Hall building in Dublin's city centre will be transformed into a giant 50 metre, low resolution, TV screen. Members of the public are invited to create animations with sound and music, via our website, and broadcast them across the city's skyline.

Powering the display are 100,000 low–energy LED lights, installed into 330 windows on the south and west faces of the building. These lights can illuminate each window as a solid colour turning it into a tiny pixel that's part of a giant display.

Playhouse Daft.ie were approached with the Playhouse idea late last year. They loved the idea and jumped on board as main sponsor and agreed to fund the project. The team was then pulled together through connections made at the Trinity Science Gallery. For nearly a year, the team have been busy creating some amazing technology and are looking forward to showcasing it to the public on the 24th of September.

Originally inspired by the Blinkenlights installation in Berlin, Playhouse raises the technological bar with the ability to produce colour animations along with sound and music (broadcast over FM radio within the vicinity of the building)."

(Ulster Bank Dublin Theatre Festival)

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2009Adobe AIRanimationBlinkenlightsbuildingcitydesigndigital cultureDublinDublin Theatre Festivaleventfacadefacade projectionfestivalFM • FM radio • installationinteractioninteractive installationLED • Liberty Hall • lightlocationlow-fi animationmedia artmotion graphicspatternpixelpixel matrix • PlayApp • Playhouse Daft.ie • Processing (software)Republic of Irelandsite-specificspectacle • Trinity Science Gallery • TV screen • video artworkvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 MAY 2005

Blinkenlights: Sleepless Night at The Bibliothèque Nationale de France

"L'installation et les réglages avaient commencé dès le 15 septembre, le spectacle a duré jusqu'à la grande soirée organisée pour la 1re Nuit Blanche de Paris, du samedi 5 au dimanche 6 octobre 2002.

Le principe, simple en apparence, mais terriblement complexe à réaliser, était d'animer sur toute sa hauteur (20 étages, 88 mètres) la tour de la BnF pour la transformer en un immense moniteur de 20x28=560 pixels, gérés en 256 teintes de gris.

L'éloignement suffisait à créer l'illusion d'une image définie (et du reste, les myopes avaient tout intérêt à ôter leurs lunettes pour mieux jouir du spectacle)."

(Jean Bonnefoy)

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2002animationarchitectureBlinkenlightsbuilding • CCC • Chaos Computer Club • cityenvironmenteventfacadefacade projectionillusioninteractive installationlocationlow-fi animationmedia artmobile • Nuit blanche • perceptionpixel matrixsitesite-specificsite-specific installation • Sleepless night of Paris • spectacle • text-message • video artworkvisualisation
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