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13 OCTOBER 2017

What is discourse analysis? by Dr Stephanie Taylor

Stephanie Taylor, NCRMUK, Published on 27 Mar 2015

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TAGS

2015academic researchacademic scholarship • AQMeN Centre • Cathie Marsh Centre • content analysisdata analysisdiscourse analysis • discursive resource • Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) • interpretive repertoire • methodological approaches • methodological research • National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM)NCRM • NCRMUK • research methodssocial phenomenasocial phenomenon • social product • social sciencesocial science research • social science research methods • Stephanie Taylor • talktext dataUniversity of EdinburghUniversity of ManchesterUniversity of Southamptonutterances

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2015

Three Approaches to Qualitative Content Analysis

"Content analysis is a widely used qualitative research technique. Rather than being a single method, current applications of content analysis show three distinct approaches: conventional, directed, or summative. All three approaches are used to interpret meaning from the content of text data and, hence, adhere to the naturalistic paradigm. The major differences among the approaches are coding schemes, origins of codes, and threats to trustworthiness. In conventional content analysis, coding categories are derived directly from the text data. With a directed approach, analysis starts with a theory or relevant research findings as guidance for initial codes. A summative content analysis involves counting and comparisons, usually of keywords or content, followed by the interpretation of the underlying context. The authors delineate analytic procedures specific to each approach and techniques addressing trustworthiness with hypothetical examples drawn from the area of end-of-life care."

(Hsiu-Fang Hsieh, Sarah E. Shannon, 2005)

TAGS

2005coding categoriescoding schemescontent analysisconventional content analysis • counting and comparisons • delineate analytic procedures • directed approach • end-of-life care • Hsiu-Fang Hsieh • humanities researchhumanities research methodology • hypothetical examples • interpret meaning • naturalistic paradigm • origins of codes • qualitative researchqualitative research technique • relevant research findings • research methodology • Sarah Shannon • social science research • social science research methodology • summative content analysis • text data • threats to trustworthiness • trustworthiness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2013

The UK National Centre for Research Methods

"The National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM) forms part of the Economic and Social Research Council's (ESRC) strategy to improve the standards of research methods across the UK social science community. NCRM was established in April 2004 with funding from the ESRC to provide more strategic integration and coordination of ESRC's investment in research methods.

NCRM provides a focal point for research, training and capacity building activities. These activities are aimed at promoting a step change in the quality and range of methodological skills and techniques used by the UK social science community, and providing support for, and dissemination of, methodological innovation and excellence within the UK."

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TAGS

2004 • capacity building • Economic and Social Research CouncilESRC • methodological innovation • methodological skills • methodological techniques • methodological traditionsNational Centre for Research Methods (NCRM)NCRMresearch methodsresearch scholarshipresearch trainingsocial science • social science community • social science researchsocial sciencesstandards • strategic coordination • strategic integration • UK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 FEBRUARY 2013

Two examples of the ethnographic design approach are shadowing and self-observations

"Shadowing is an ethnographic technique to understand a person's real–time interactions with products, services or process and their shifting contexts and needs over the course of a day. Shadowing often focuses on particular events or tasks participants are willing to share. Talk Aloud and closure interviews are used to clarify questions.

Self–observations / Diaries is a method used when it is difficult or impossible to directly access a certain place (like people's homes) or access is too time consuming. It consists of asking people to provide self–observations about their activities in the form of log reports or diaries, for example. Although this method involves the subjectivity of the participants in the data collected, it can be valuable to get a glimpse of life through the eyes of the people that are being studied."

(Experientia)

TAGS

ehaviours • context of use • contextual observations • design ethnography • diaries • diaryethnographic design approachethnographic researchethnographyexperience design • faithful reporting • human behaviour • key social actors • natural environment • observation and participation • remote user research • research method • self-observations • shadowing • social science research • unarticulated motivations • user interviews • user researchvalues • video ethnography

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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