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Which clippings match 'Tradition' keyword pg.2 of 9
02 FEBRUARY 2012

Upside Down, Left To Right: A Letterpress Film

"A short documentary film about letterpress and one of the few remaining movable–type printing workshops in the UK, situated at Plymouth University, featuring Paul Collier."

(Danny Cooke)

Fig.1 A film by Danny Cooke dannycooke.co.uk, soundtrack by Tony Higgins tonyhiggins.org.

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Adobe Illustrator • alloy • bookscraftcultural technologyDanny Cookedesign processdevicegraphic designhand-crafted typeinkJohannes Gutenbergletteringletterpresslithographymaterialitymechanical • metal • metal type • movable metal • movable typepagesetting • Paul Collier • Plymouth University • press • printingprinting press • printing workshops • processpublishingshort documentaryshort filmtactile • tactile process • technical process • technologytraditiontraditional processtraditional techniquestypetypographyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2011

Guardian launches Facebook app

"The Guardian has launched a new Facebook app, becoming one of the first newspapers to launch a product alongside the social networking giant.

The new app, unveiled at Facebook's f8 conference in San Francisco on Thursday, will allow the social network's 750 million users to read guardian.co.uk articles without leaving the social network. The guardian.co.uk network of websites includes MediaGuardian.co.uk.

The Guardian is one of a number of media organisations to launch partnerships with Facebook at this year's f8, including the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal and Spotify.

'We know that a lot of Guardian readers are keen Facebook users, and vice versa, so we wanted to create a news experience that was native to the Facebook environment,' said Meg Pickard, GNM head of digital engagement.

'The app draws on the social functionality they are already familiar with to highlight and discover quality Guardian content, and makes users' reading experience more personal and relevant.

'We've had a presence on Facebook for some time, but working with them to develop this app as a Facebook Open Graph launch partner has demonstrated that it's possible to get the best of both social and news worlds. We can also engage new readers who may not already be frequently interacting with the Guardian brand, who can now discover our excellent content via their friends' interactions.'

Christian Hernandez, director of platform partnerships at Facebook, said: 'Since Facebook Platform launched four years ago, innovative companies have been transforming industries by rebuilding products through social design.

'The Guardian is rethinking how people consume news online through its new integration with Facebook, making it easier for people to discover the most relevant news through their friends.'

The Facebook app is part of Guardian publisher Guardian News & Media's shift to a digital–first strategy and comes a week after it launched its new US website homepage out of New York."

(Josh Halliday, 22 September 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MAY 2011

John Berger: Ways of Seeing

"Published in 1972 and based on a BBC television programme of the same name, this is a very influential text on art criticism. Although the book and programme make the same case, they do so in slightly different ways, and the programme is well worth watching. For the photographer, the book has the advantage of putting photography in the context of western art. For the student new to critical theory, it has the advantage of being produced for a mass audience, and has as a central aim the de–mystification of art. These two points make it relatively easy to understand. A further advantage this book has is that many students have not had the opportunity to study photography, but have studied art, and so the book presents a logical progression for them when they start to study photography.

The television programme is divided into four sections and although the book is divided into seven chapters (three being made up solely of images), the book also covers four areas."

(John Berger, 1990)

John Berger (1990). 'Ways of Seeing: Based on the BBC Television Series', Penguin

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TAGS

1972academic discourse • advertising photography • artart criticismauthorshipBBC • buying power • commercialisationconnoisseurshipconsumerism • demystifying • John Bergermass audiencemeaningmechanical reproduction • modern consumerist society • nude in western artobjectification of women • objectified women • oil painting • photographic reproduction • photographypictorial reproduction • power of money • publicity • realismrepresentationseeingsocial constructionismspectacletelevision documentarytelevision programmetraditionvisual culturevisual depictionvisual languagevisual literacyvisual representational strategiesWays of Seeingwestern art • what we know

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

Educators who have repeated the same kerning and hand-drawn letterform exercises will find themselves teaching at a school that simply isn't focused on typography anymore

"We are a culture that increasingly questions consumption and advertising, which are at the heart of industrial and graphic design disciplines. We rely on a dynamic and constantly evolving technological platform that touches all aspects of life. There is an increased demand for service–based jobs as our country re–evaluates economic sustainability. People are demanding quality, reflective and meaningful experiences in their world.

Yet design education, as a whole, hasn't embraced these challenges and opportunities.

To be direct and explicit, educators who have taught the same foundation studies courses for years will need to dramatically revamp their courses or face irrelevance. Educators who have repeated the same kerning and hand–drawn letterform exercises will find themselves teaching at a school that simply isn't focused on typography anymore – and tenure notwithstanding, these individuals will find themselves without a role. Educators who are unwilling to retrain themselves will be replaced.

If you are one of these educators, or you work at one of these programs, you may acknowledge these necessary shifts, but find personal action to be difficult. It is difficult. And it's difficult because the shift is large, fundamental and of critical importance. You'll need to read, and take courses, and attend new conferences; you'll need to re–build yourself and your expertise in a new light. You'll go from knowing all of the answers to not even knowing the problems.

But it's no longer a matter of choice. Because if you aren't able to find a new opportunity, a new specialty, and embrace the topics described above, you may soon find yourself alone or replaced. Our subject matter is too important, and our role too fundamental, to leave to the traditions of even great educational movements like the Bauhaus. The subject of design is the humanization of technology, and as long as technological advancements continue, so the pragmatic and day–to–day jobs of designers will continue to morph. And so must design education continue to evolve."

(Jon Kolko, 2010)

Jon Kolko (2010). 'Remapping The Curriculum', AIGA | the professional association for design

AIGA Design Educators Conference "New Contexts/New Practices", October 8–10, 2010, at North Carolina State University in Raleigh

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 APRIL 2011

The First British Royal Wedding of the Digital Era

"The first item to come out of the social media trends box is that this will be the first British royal wedding to be streamed live on the web, and this list goes on. As it will also be the first to have a mobile application; and the first with a soundtrack to be released on iTunes within hours of the ceremony. The Palace has been open to Universal Music Group, and its Decca record label, which plans to release the soundtrack of the wedding ceremony, on iTunes and later as a CD. In return Universal has promised a donation to charity.

A British Royal wedding is normally associated with pomp, tradition and a stiff upper lip, but now through technology it is interactive, cross–platform,multimedia, multichannel, hyperlinked,24/7, user–generated, search–engine–optimised, downloadable extravaganza! Yes, the Royals are embracing social media trends galore. There is an official website, Facebook page and of course Twitter feeds all for the big 'W'."

(Sangeeta Haindl, 6 April 2011, Justmeans)

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201124/7 • British Royal Wedding • CDcelebrityceremonycross-platform • Decca • digital era • downloadable • etiquetteeventextravaganceFacebookHRHhyperlinkediTunesKate Middletonmarriage • matrimony • mobile application • monarchy • multichannelmultimedia • pageant • Prince Williamritualroyal familyroyal wedding • search-engine-optimised • SEOsocial media • social media trends • soundtrackspectaclestreaming mediatraditionTwitterUKUniversal Music Groupweddingwedding ceremony

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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