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18 SEPTEMBER 2013

Window shopping with Kate Spade Saturday's touchscreen storefront

"Kate Spade Saturday has taken up residence in New York with four pop–up digital stores appearing as window fronts around the city. ... Standing in front of the window, shoppers can click to explore looks, opt to buy them via PayPal, and best of all have them delivered with an hour to wherever they are in the city thanks to a partnership with eBay. Security also isn't a concern–despite being a giant screen, the initiative doesn't ask for credit card information or your address for every other passerby to see, instead texting you with a link that leads you to your window shop bag on your own phone instead."

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TAGS

2013 • 24hr shopping • click to exploreclothing companyclothing retailer • designer brand • digital storefront • digitally enhanced pop-up shop • eBayfuture interfacesglassyhaptic interfacein-personinteraction designinteractive display • interactive touchscreen • Kate Spade • Kate Spade New York (designer brand) • Kate Spade Saturday (clothing label) • m-commerceNew Yorknon-place • PayPal • pictures under glass • pop-up digital store • pop-up shopprogrammed useretail spaceretail storesingle-minded spaces • store window • storefronttouchscreen • touchscreen storefront • visual facade • William McComb • window display • window front • window shopping

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

The Art of the Email Interview

"Our first iteration of the email interview was something like an open–ended survey. It explained the project and supplied the appropriate participant information and consent forms. Then, it listed the questions. It was in many ways a participant friendly version of the interview guide.

While the turnaround on the email interview surveys was really good from a time perspective, we felt that the answers we were getting were very short, to the point, and formal. This is in contrast to our in–person interviews, where answers to one question would often meander through several equally interesting subjects in the process of their completion.

So I thought a lot about how the in–person interviews were different from the email interviews, and I realized it was that with in–person interviews, the participant doesn't know all of the questions you will be asking up front. Usually we tell them what kind of questions we will be asking, or what kind of information we are looking for, but the specific questions are unknown. As a result, the participant will often include a lot more information in the answer to each question. There was something about seeing all of the questions all at once that was cutting off this meandering; something about having all of the questions in front of the participant at once made the answers short and to the point.

So our solution was to send email interview questions one at a time.

This was a tremendous success. When we sent the questions one at a time, the answers were long, rich, and varied. ...

We have tried out the second iteration of email interviewing on several participants, and have been blown away with their responses.

There are probably restrictions that come with this method. It is probably not appropriate for people who do not normally communicate via text–based mediums. (Our participants are very comfortable with the written communication of the internet, so in our case this has not been an issue.) It might also be less appealing to very busy executives–our coursemate Cora is doing a project with such folks, and she feels that her participants would become irritated with the process after three questions."

(Rachel Shadoan, 31 July 2010)

TAGS

consent forms • email interview • email interviewingemail interviewsethnographic methodsethnographic researchethnography • Facebook interview • in-person • in-person interviews • information gatheringinterview (research method) • interview guide • interview questions • meander • meandering • mediated environments • open-ended survey • participant • participant information • research dialoguesresearch methodsocial mediasocial media researchersurvey • text-based mediums • written communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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