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Which clippings match 'Tower Of Babel' keyword pg.1 of 1
06 NOVEMBER 2013

Rare Film Programme for Fraitz Lang's 1927 Masterpiece

"The world's most valuable movie poster, for Fritz Lang's 1927 masterpiece Metropolis, is to be auctioned again after making a record $690,000 in 2005. Ephemera related to the film is notoriously scarce, with only four copies of the poster known to survive. Almost as uncommon is this amazing film programme produced for the London premiere at the Marble Arch Pavilion on March 21, 1927, one of only three copies that we have handled. Not only a list of cast and crew, it includes eleven short pieces on the making of the movie, commentary from the director and cast, and numerous production photographs and film stills, many attractively arranged as modernist collages. One of the most interesting sections shows in parallel columns how a passage of film scenes was adapted from the novel of the same name by Lang's wife, Thea von Harbou."

(Laura Massey, 10 July 2012, Peter Harrington)

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TAGS

1927 • auction house • British premiere • cast and crew • film premiere • film programme • film stillsFritz LangGerman cinemaLondonmaking of • Marble Arch Pavilion • masterpieceMetropolis (1927) • modernist collage • movie poster • production photographs • rare bookssouvenirThea von HarbouTower of Babel

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2013

Boris Bilinsky's Constructivist-inspired Metropolis film poster

"This composition comprises the flat, featureless and strongly linear below–ground buildings of Metropolis' workers city, transformed and transposed into a mass of soaring, above–ground skyscrapers, huddled together and rather chaotically intersected by aerial roads and walkways. This interpretation of Fritz Lang's urban vision, as opposed to a mere reproduction of images from the film, makes a stunning poster. The strongly linear elements of Bilinsky's cityscape contrasts with the circular Tower of Babel and other soft–edged constructions which exist in Joh Fredersen's above–ground city for the rich and privileged. This poster has been reproduced in a number of publications dealing with European film posters, posters in general, and art movements of the 1920s. Bilinsky's work presents an artisitc bridge between Russian constructivism with is hard edges and linearity, and the soft, romantic elements so much a part of the French tradition."

Fig.1 Metropolis – L'Alliance Cinématographique Européenne présente une production UFA réalisé par Fritz Lang d'aprés le scénario de Thea von Harbou. UFA ACE', 4 Sheet poster, (240 x 320 cm) 224 x 303.5 cm / 96 x 120 inches, Farblithografie, Bédos et Cie, Paris, 1927. Signed 'Boris Bilinsky', upper right. Collection: Kunstbibliothek, Staatliche Museen / Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Berlin. René Clémenti–Bilinsky catalogue no.1030.

(Michael Organ and René Clémenti–Bilinsky)

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TAGS

1920s1927 • Boris Bilinsky • cityscapeConstructivist-inspireddesign formalismfilm posterFrench artistic traditionFritz Lang • hard edges • Joh Fredersen • linear elements • linearityMetropolis (1927) • Michael Organ • modernist aesthetics • Modernist masterpiece • poster design • Rene Clementi-Bilinsky • romantic elements • skyscraper • soft elements • Thea von HarbouTower of Babelurban visionvisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JANUARY 2004

Freemason: Secular Architect Shaping The World

"Freemasonry was founded around the image of the secular architect shaping the world and himself within it so as to provide both with a sense of moral order. Stonemasons, forerunners of modern architects, not only provided the symbolic tools :this reshaping process, but because of their past, particularly their association with the building of the great cathedrals in Europe, supplied the link with religious certainty and order. But it was the building of Solomon's Temple which was the central myth of freemasonry. It embodied spatially a utopic of moral order in which individuals might lead a virtuous life and come to create the social conditions of trust required in the contractual society that was emerging around them. Freemasons devoted considerable energy to seeking out their origins of their craft in the ancient world, notably associated with the great feats of architecture down the ages. Freemasons were imputed to have been involved in almost every architectural feat in history, right back to Noah and his ark and including on the way the construction of Solomon's Temple and the Tower of Babel."

(Kevin Hetherington, 1997, p.87)

Hetherington, K. (1997). "The Badlands Of Modernity: Heterotopia And Social Ordering". London: Routledge.

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