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Which clippings match 'Flat Space' keyword pg.2 of 3
10 FEBRUARY 2013

River of Wisdom: animated version of a Song Dynasty painting

"After debuting at the Expo 2010 Shanghai China (2010上海世界博覽會) and traveling to Hong Kong and Macau, an animated version of the Song Dynasty painting Along the River During the Qingming Festival (清明上河圖), by 12th–century artist Zhang Zeduan (張澤端), is on show in Taipei. The 25cm by 529cm original is a panoramic portrayal of everyday life in Bianjing (汴京), today's Kaifeng (開封), the capital of China during the Song Dynasty. Despite its name, the scroll depicts the architecture and scenery of the period and the apparel and activities of the rich and poor, not the rituals of the Qingming Festival (清明節), otherwise known as Tomb Sweeping Festival. Thirty times larger than the original painting, the animated version, which is titled River of Wisdom, is beamed onto a 6m by 110m screen by 12 projectors. The entire work was digitalized by Crystal CG (水晶石數字科技公司) and its subjects and backdrops move and make sounds."

(Lin King, 29 July 2011, Taipei Times)

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12th century20103D animation • Along the River During • animatedanimated experienceanimated paintinganimation • apparel • Beijing • Bianjing • Chinesecontinuous scene • Crystal CG • everyday life • Expo 2010 • flat picture planeflat spaceHong Kongimmersive experience • Kaifeng • large scale installation • life-size replica • living paintingliving pictures • Macau • Ming Dynasty • painting • Palace Museum • panoramapanoramic portrayal • Qing court • Qingming Festival • Qingyuan • Qiu Ying • remediation • rich and poor • ritual • River of Wisdom • sceneryscrollShanghai • Song Dynasty • Taipei • Taipei Times • Tomb Sweeping Festival • video muralvirtual heritage • Zhang Zeduan

CONTRIBUTOR

Guannan (cassie) Du
18 DECEMBER 2012

Verknipte tijden / Distorted times

Fig.1 Gideon van der Stelt (2012). "Verknipte tijden / Distorted times", collage of existing film fragments, released into my paper–folded version of Utrecht. Shot on a 7D and processed in After Effects.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Andy Love
31 MARCH 2012

Rob Bryanton: Imagining the 10th Dimension

"Since the extra dimensions beyond spacetime that physicists talk about are all spatial dimensions (or 'space–like' as some prefer to say), thinking about how the simplest spatial dimensions relate one to another gives us tools for imagining the more complex ones. The key to remember with all this is that each additional spatial dimension is at 'right angles' to the one before: so each new dimension allows an observer to see 'around the corner' in a way that was unattainable from the previous dimension. This time, let's work through the dimensions with that idea in mind."

(Rob Bryanton, October 2009)

Rob Bryanton (2006). "Imagining the Tenth Dimension: A New Way of Thinking About Time and Space", Trafford Publishing.

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10th dimension • 20065th dimensionabstractionanimated presentationcausalitycausally relatedconceptual metaphorconceptualisationcontemporaneous • cosmological horizon • dimensionality • dimensionsEdwin A. Abbott • enfolded symmetry • flat spacefree will • Gevin Giorbran • god • granularity • hologramHugh Everett • hyperspace • in perspective • infinity • information space • Kurt Godel • lineline in spaceMany Worlds Interpretationmathematics • Michael Shermer • multiple dimensions • multiverse • objective reality • omni-directional • omniverse • organising pattern • parallel universeperspectivephysics • planck length • planepointprobabilistic outcomes • probability space • quantum mechanics • quantum physics • quantum wave function • Rob Bryanton • science • Sean Carroll • space • space-like • space-time • spatial dimension • spatial dimensions • string theorytime • two-dimensional plane • universevisual representations of mathematical conceptsvisual scientific representationszero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 SEPTEMBER 2011

Riduan Tomkins' formal use of figuration

"Figuration itself is not inconsistent with the Modernist tradition since, even the most abstract of Modernist work makes references to things outside itself, yet, of all the features in Tomkins' work, the distinctive way in which he uses figuration seems to set it apart from the rest. Giacometti–like (although informed by Picasso and Matisse) troupes of figures edge around the paintings always playing some formal role but never solely in virtue of their form, scale, colour or location. Typically they point, both literally and figuratively, to formal elements in the Works, including, curiously enough, each other – but they also fly on trapezes, hold safety nets, dance and strike poses. None of the figures, however, are merely incidental to formal issues and although interdependent with them they have, as well, a life of their own. This invites interpretation, at least to the extent that we find ourselves reflecting on how and why the figures appear to us as they do – like mute vandevillians whose master, Tomkins, having rendered them onto some flattened proscenium, orchestrates their participation in a frozen theatrical tragicomic tableau. However, we cannot know the purpose of such entertainments beyond their capacity to intrigue and amuse us."

(Ted Bracey, 1987)

2) Ted Bracey (1987). Robert McDougall Art Gallery [now Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu].

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abstraction • Alberto Giacometti • Aotearoa New Zealandauthentic residueChristchurchcolour fielddancedesign formalismfigurationfiguresfigures in spaceflat spaceflat surface • flattened proscenium • formformal elements • formal issues • frozenHenri Matisselegitimacyminimalist artmodernismmodernist traditionPablo Picassopainting • pentimenti • pentimento • proscenium arch • reflexive aesthetic practices • Riduan Tomkins • scale • School of Fine Arts • strike a pose • tableautableau vivant • Ted Bracey • theatricaltragicomictrapezeUniversity of Canterbury • vaudeville • visual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2009

Thomas Allen: pulp fiction remixes

"[Thomas] Allen's photographs are inspired by his childhood experiences with pop–up books and View–Masters. He begins his process by cutting figures and images out of illustrated pages of old books and vintage fiction novels. Allen then cleverly rearranges and juxtaposes the forms to create three–dimensional scenes. Next, he carefully lights his subjects and photographs the scenes.

When separated from their original stories, the figures take on fresh roles in entirely new situations. Yet they retain their intended purpose of storytelling. Characters and objects originally created as two–dimensional illustrations are raised from their pages and given new life in three–dimensional space. The figures return back to two–dimensional objects, this time in the form of a photograph."
(Joseph Bellows Gallery)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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