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Which clippings match 'Digital Displays' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 OCTOBER 2014

Interactive dancing traffic lights make waiting more entertaining

"An interactive installation in Lisbon aims to encourage pedestrians to wait until it's safe to cross the road by making the traffic lights 'dance' using motion capture technology (+ movie).

Car brand Smart teamed up with advertising agency BBDO Germany to create a special pedestrian crossing light in the Portugese capital, featuring a red stick figure that dances to attract the attention of pedestrians who might otherwise walk out into the road.

The project was part of a wider marketing campaign by Smart to launch two new versions of its compact city car–the Smart ForTwo and the Smart ForFour–which also included a roadshow around Europe."

(Dezeen, 17 September 2014)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JANUARY 2014

Chris O'Shea's interactive installation: Hand from Above

"Hand From Above encourages us to question our normal routine when we often find ourselves rushing from one destination to another. Inspired by Land of the Giants and Goliath, we are reminded of mythical stories by mischievously unleashing a giant hand from the BBC Big Screen. Passers by will be playfully transformed. What if humans weren't on top of the food chain? Unsuspecting pedestrians will be tickled, stretched, flicked or removed entirely in real–time by a giant deity.

Hand from Above is a joint co–commission between FACT: Foundation for Art & Creative Technology and Liverpool City Council for BBC Big Screen Liverpool and the Live Sites Network. It premiered during the inaugural Abandon Normal Devices Festival."

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TAGS

2009 • Abandon Normal Devices Festival • arts festivalaugmented reality • BBC Big Screens Project • camera-based interactionChris OSheadigital displaysdigital screensFoundation for Art and Creative Technologygiant • giant hand • Goliath • hand • Hand from Above (2009) • immersive experienceinteractive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • Land of the Giants (television) • Live Sites Network • Liverpool • Liverpool City Council • mythical stories • OpenCVOpenFrameworks • Owen Lloyd • public space

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 JANUARY 2014

Interactive billboards that drop angels on your head

"There you are in the middle of the city, traffic all around, planes buzzing above and you notice a little boy on a giant screen pointing up. 'Look,' says the boy. And you look, and the on–screen boy is pointing at an actual plane flying in the sky. He knows its flight number, its destination. This is no joke. That is flight BA475 from Barcelona! He tracks its path with his little hand, and then, when the plane is gone, he dashes off. This is a British Airways display ad in London's Piccadilly Circus, and it's using to identify actual planes in the actual sky.

Digital billboards are stepping up their game. They are becoming . There's another stunning example at Euston Station (also in London) that shows a man furiously screaming at a woman who is clearly frightened. But you can help. If you have a cellphone, you can yank the man clear across the station, dragging him from screen to screen to screen until he's way on the other side of the terminal.

I've got one more. This time it's a fantasy experience available to anyone who steps into a marked spot in the middle of Victoria Station. (London's a happening place for billboard experimentation.) Once you're there, a holographic angel drops down from heaven and lands beside you. You can't see her in real space, but you and she are plainly visible on a screen that everybody in the station can see, and you are free to interact anyway you please."

(Robert Krulwich, 04 January 2014, NPR)

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TAGS

2014advertising in public spacesaeroplaneangelawareness raisingbillboardboy • British Airways • cellphonecreative advertising • cute girl • digital billboardsdigital displaysdigital screens • display ad • domestic violence • e-motion screens • Euston Station • experience design • fantasy experience • flight number • flying • frighten • furious • get involvedholograph • interactive billboard • interactive digital displayinteractive displayinteractive installationinteractive screen • intervene • JCDecaux • London Victoria • Lynx Excite • manmobile phone • National Centre for Domestic Violence (NCDV) • NPROgilvy Group UK • Piccadilly Circus • pointing • public spacescream • screen to screen • sky • surveillance technology • train station • Victoria Station • visual communicationwoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 FEBRUARY 2013

How will the future objects and methods of graphic design and the industries it serves be reconfigured?

Thursday 07 and Friday 08 March 2013, Open, 20 Bank Plain, Norwich, Norfolk, NR2 4SF

"A two day symposium organised by Norwich University of the Arts that will explore the relationship between print and digital, and the coexistence of media in a wider sense; how they combine, and how they provide unique opportunities.

As the design industry embraces dramatic changes in technology, the Cowbird Symposium will look at graphic design as an output, a practice and a profession, exploring the relationships between print and screen–based communication. Guest speakers, all leading thinkers and practitioners themselves, will be invited to comment on the future of the distributed text–the book, magazine, newspaper and poster, as well as the challenge and opportunity afforded by new technologies, tablets, e–readers, smart phones, augmented reality, social media, digital displays, and new practices, crowdsourcing, coding, data sharing, and social reading."

(Norwich University of the Arts)

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TAGS

2013augmented realitybook formcoding • coexistence of media • Cowbird Symposium • crowdsourcingdata sharingdesign for printdesign industrydigital displaysdiscourse and practice • distributed text • e-readergraphic designgraphic design discoursegraphic design practice • graphic design profession • magazine form • new practicesnew technologiesnewspaper • Norwich University of the Arts • objects and methods • poster designprint and digital • screen-based communication • smart phonesocial mediasocial readingsymposiumtabletstechnological changethe future of digital content • the future of graphic design • the future of the bookUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2004

Church On 5th Avenue: dream-like quality through physical blurring

"Church on 5th Avenue is three from Campbell's Ambiguous Icon series. Video images taken from New York street scenes soon after September 11, take on new life on LED display panels. A sheet of plexiglas in front of each panel alters our perception of the image. In Fifth Avenue Cutaway #2 the sheet is close to the panel surface, allowing the viewer to perceive each LED. Because the plexiglas is further from the LED surface in Fifth Avenue Cutaway #3, the image is blurred, taking on a dream–like quality. In Church on Fifth Avenue the sheet of diffusing plexiglas is angled in front of the grid, so that as the pedestrians move from left to right, their form becomes increasingly indistinct. Using largely redundant technology in a new way, Campbell thus creates a metaphorical transition from the digital image made from pixels to the filmic analogue image."

(Jim Campbell)

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TAGS

2001analogue and digitalblurblurry • Church on 5th Avenue • digital displaysdigital screensinstallation • Jim Campbell • LEDlow-definition screenplexiglasredSeptember 11
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