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15 AUGUST 2013

Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media-Specific Analysis

"Many critics see the electronic age as heralding the end of books. I think this view is mistaken. Books are far too robust, reliable, long–lived, and versatile to be rendered obsolete by digital media. Rather, digital media have given us an opportunity we have not had for the last several hundred years: the chance to see print with new eyes and, with that chance, the possibility of understanding how deeply literary theory and criticism have been imbued with assumptions specific to print. As we continue to work toward critical practices and theories appropriate for electronic literature, we may come to renewed appreciation for the specificity of print. In the tangled web of medial ecology, change anywhere in the system stimulates change everywhere in the system. Books are not going the way of the dinosaur but the way of the human, changing as we change, mutating and evolving in ways that will continue, as a book lover said long ago, to teach and delight."

(Katherine Hayles, 2004)

Katherine Hayles (2004). "Print is Flat, Code is Deep: The Importance of Media–Specific Analysis" Poetics Today, Volume 25, Number 1, Spring 2004, pp. 67–90.

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TAGS

2004analogue and digital • analogue resemblance • bookscodecritical enquirycritical practices • cyborg reading practices • digital coding • digital media • distributed cognitive environments • electronic age • electronic hypertext • electronic literature • embodied entities • emergent property • end of booksend of printevolving form • instantiation • interpretation of signsKatherine Haylesliterary criticismliterary theorymaterialitymedia ecologiesmedia specificity • media-specific analysis • medial ecology • medium specificitymutabilitynatural languageobsolete medium • physical characteristics • physical specificity • recombination • renewed appreciation • signification • signifying strategies • somnolence • spaces to navigate • specificity of printtextstransformable • versatile medium • women in cultural theory

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JULY 2013

XFR STN (Transfer Station) at the New Museum in New York

"The New Museum is accepting requests from the public for digital preservation of artist–produced moving image and born–digital content. Appointments for transfer and recovery are available from July 17 through September 8, 2013, transfers occur as part of the exhibition/lab 'XFR STN' ...

All moving image materials that are digitized as part of the exhibition will be made publicly available by the New Museum on the Internet Archive, a nonprofit institution whose mission includes offering 'free and open access to all the world's knowledge' and to provide permanent access for researchers, historians, scholars, people with disabilities, and the general public to cultural heritage collections. All artists submitting moving image materials will be able to download preservation–grade digital versions of their materials from the Internet Archive. Born–digital materials that are digitized as part of the exhibition can be made available by the New Museum on the Internet Archive at the artist's discretion. As part of 'XFR STN,' selections from the digitized content posted on the Internet Archive will be informally screened in the exhibition galleries."

Fig.1 Matthew Geller answering phones during the live call–in segment of Cara Perlman's End of the World show, produced for Potato Wolf, a project of Colab TV, ca. 1978

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TAGS

2013 • aging material • analogue and digital formatsanalogue mediaarchivingaudiovisualBetacam SPborn-digitalcompact disccultural collecting organisationscultural heritagecultural heritage collectionsdigital artefactsdigital formatdigital heritagedigital preservationdigital video • digital videotape • digitisation project • digitisation services • early recording technologyfloppy diskInternet Archive • Iomega Jaz • Iomega Zip • media capture • media distributionmedia formatmedia past • media recovery • media storage • MiniDV • Monday/Wednesday/Friday Video Club • moving image transfer • MWF • New Museum of Contemporary ArtNew YorkNTSCobsolete mediumpreservation • preservation moving image materials • preserving the pastrecent past • Sony Hi8 • technology convergence • U-Matic • VHSvideo archivevideo artists • video transfer • videotape • visual arts • XFR STN

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Pre Certification Video

"A 'pre-cert video' (Pre-Certification) is any videotape (or laserdisc/CED) issued in the UK before the introduction of the 1984 Video Recordings Act.

Pre-cert videos were not required by law to be submitted to the BBFC so the era was unregulated, leading to many uncut releases of videos which would have fallen foul of the BBFC's strict guidelines, and would therefore have been censored if submission to the board was a legal requirement.

However, whilst many of the larger respectable companies simply issued their previously BBFC certificated cinema releases onto video to play safe as they feared there was bound to be a clampdown at some stage, some of the smaller independent companies decided to take advantage of the unregulated video rentals market by issuing 'strong uncut' versions depicting graphic violence and gore. A whole barrage of titles previously banned by the BBFC from getting a cinema release suddenly ended up uncensored on home video.

What began as a bill drafted by little known Luton Tory back bencher Graham Bright was made law after he and the tabloid press (most notably The Daily Mail) had successfully whipped the media into a frenzied hysteria over so-called 'video nasties'. Ban the Sadist Videos! was one of the more famous headlines they ran. When the bill was made law it became a legal requirement that all videotapes must be submitted to the BBFC for classification (and possible cuts).

The pre-cert video era is best remembered (amongst horror fans in particular) for the ensuing 'video nasty' debacle in which a selection of 72 videotapes were singled out and prosecuted by the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions) under Section 2 or Section 3 of the OPA (Obscene Publications Act). Of these, 39 titles were deemed by the courts to be obscene and it's those titles which formed the final 'Video Nasties list."

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TAGS

1984analogue mediab-moviebad tastebanned • Betamax • British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) • Capacitance Electronic Disc (CED)censorship • cinema release • collectiblesDaily Mail • DiscoVision • exploitation films • exploitation movies • film classification • gore • Graham Bright • graphic violencehome video • LaserDisc • legislationmisogyny • Music and Video (magazine) • nostalgia • Obscene Publications Act (OPA) • obscenityobsolete medium • Popular Video (magazine) • pre-cert video • pre-cert video era • pre-cert videos • pre-certification video • rare video releases • SelectaVisionsexploitation • shocksploitation • slasher • slasher film • sleaze • teensploitation • Television and Home Video (magazine) • UK • unregulated industry • VCR (N1500) • VCR (N1700) • VHS • Video 2000 • Video Business (magazine) • Video Cassette Recorder (VCR) • Video Cassette Recording • Video Compact Cassette (VCC) • video distribution • video nasties • video nasty • Video News (magazine) • Video Recordings Act • video releases • video rental • video rentals market • Video Retailer (magazine) • Video Review (magazine) • Video The Magazine • Video Today (magazine) • Video Trade Weekly (magazine) • Video Viewer (magazine) • Video Week (magazine) • Video World (magazine) • videocassette • videocassette recorder • VideoDisc • videotapes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 FEBRUARY 2013

jodi.org

"JODI has over the years built quite a reputation, especially with their notorious CD–rom OSS/**** (Mediamatic, Amsterdam 1998) which, immediately after installation, executes a takeover of the computer. In 1999 their work was part of exhibitions like Netconditions at the ZKM at Karlsruhe, The Allure of the Digitalat the Tate Gallery in London and the SONAR festival in Barcelona. They were awarded a number of international prizes, amongst which the Webby Awards in San Francisco. JODI disposed of this prize immediately, calling the DotCom–audience 'ugly %commercial sons–of–bitches'. In the year 2000 JODI was present at several international group–exhibitions and festivals, such as the Transmediale in Berlin and Deathmatch at Hangar in Barcelona Even an apparently obsolete medium like teletext did not escape JODI's interference. In 2000 they released their unusual way of thinking on 'Page 379' on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of this medium."

(v2.nl)

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TAGS

artart installationartist collectivecodecomputercreative practice • Deathmatch • digital detritusDirk Paesmans • DotCom-audience • hypertext • interference • InternetJoan HeemskerkJODI (art collective)Mediamaticnet artnet.art • Netconditions (exhibition) • obsolete medium • Page 379 • SONAR festival • takeover • Tate Modern • teletext • The Allure of the Digitalat • Transmediale festivalV2_ • Webby Awards • ZKM

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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