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Which clippings match 'Jean Tinguely' keyword pg.1 of 1
17 APRIL 2014

Jean Tinguely: Art, Machines and Motion

"Jean Tinguely exhibited in a show titled 'Art, Machines and Motion' at the Kaplan Gallery, London, in November 1959. In conjunction with that exhibition, Tinguely held a conference and performance at the Institute of Contemporary Art on November 16 titled 'Static, Static, Static! Be Static!' During the event, 1.5 km of paper drawn by two cyclists on his meta–matic bicycle were spread through the audience while Tinguely read his theory of movement and machines simultaneously heard on radio in Paris."

(Rosemary O'Neill, p.159)

Rosemary O'Neill (2011). Total Art and Fluxus in Nice. "Art and Visual Culture on the French Riviera, 1956–1971: The Ecole De Nice", Ashgate Publishing Limited.

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TAGS

1959abstract artanarchicart exhibition • Art Machines and Motion (exhibition) • auto-generateavant-garde artistsbicycleBritish Pathecontraptiondo-it-yourself • Ewan Phillips • generative artgenerative compositional techniqueInstitute of Contemporary Artsinteractive artironicJean Tinguely • Kaplan Gallery • kinetic sculptureLondonmachine aestheticmachinesmechanical device • meta-matic bicycle • meta-maticsmid 20th-centurymotion • movement and machines • moving machinesnewsreel • Nouveau Realistes • paperParisplayfulradiorobot artrobotised assemblagessculptorsculpture • speed sculpture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 APRIL 2012

Irony and Utopia: a history of computer art

Fig.1 Jean Tinguely 1960). Homage to New York.

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19651975amateurismauthorship • Beau Sievers • chrome age • commercial computer graphics • computer and video games • computer art practicecomputer artistscomputer gamescomputer graphicscomputer musicconvergenceCybernetic Serendipitydigital cultureE.A.T.eco arthistoryHomage to New YorkJean Tinguelymedia artnet.artnew media • scientific computer graphics • skeptical perspective • sub-amateur • utopian perspectivevideo gamesvirtual realityvisualisation • weak gestures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2004

Jean Tinguely: the self-destroying machine

The Dennis Cooper Gallery published a written record of the event; it includes the memory of fellow artist Billy Klüver

"The piano began playing. Jean had reversed the belt for his big meta–matic painting machine which was the centre piece. The painting on the long roll of paper was supposed to spill out over the audience. I could very easily have reversed the belt, but he took my arm away and said 'Don't touch, Billy.' He had decided that whatever happened should happen. Some time later the weather balloon was supposed to blow up and explode but there was not enough gas in the gas tank we had bought, so it ended up hanging limply. The piano on the right side had a candle on the keyboard which in the third minute was lighted by an overheating resistor. Three minutes later a bucket of gasoline above the candle was tipped over and the piano began to burn gloriously while it was furiously playing away.A small bassinet had been filled with ammonia. When I closed the switch to start the machine, Robert Breer's task was to pour titanium tetrachloride into it. The combination of ammonia and titanium tetrachloride produces, as you all know, white... in this case white smoke, which poured out of the bassinet, until it finally engulfed the specially invited, elegantly dressed audience. It was all over in 27 minutes. The audience applauded and descended on the wreckage for souvenirs. Jean called the event 'Homage to New York."

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1960 • Billy Kluver • Dennis Cooper Gallery • homageHomage to New YorkJean Tinguelymachinemeta-maticsNorth American artistpianoself-destroyingsouvenir • wreckage
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