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22 OCTOBER 2012

Ars Electronica Festival: New Concepts for a New World

"THE BIG PICTURE is the theme of the [August 30 to September 3] 2012 Ars Electronica Festival ... Occupying the focal point is the effort to identify all–encompassing images that capture the world that's coming to be, Big Pictures that do justice to the progressive globalization and interrelatedness of our world, ones that capture its contradictions and flaws as well as ways in which people are coming together. By showcasing inspiring best–practice examples from art and science, this year's festival is a call for a new, open–minded way of considering the development of a viable vision of our future – how such a Big Picture ought to be composed and how it might become reality."

(Ars Electronica Festival, 2012)

Fig.1 work of Seiko Mikami "Desire of Codes"

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TAGS

2012Ars ElectronicaArs Electronica Festivalart and sciencebecoming • best practice examples • big picturesbrave new world • coming to be • coming togethercontradiction and changecultural transformationgenius of the individualglobal crisis • global political stage • global vision • global warmingglobalisationglobalised world • hesitation • humankind • interrelatedness • isolationism • it will be OK • junk heap • media art • media art festival • natural sciences • necessary changes • networked world • new epoch • open-minded • our future • overspecialised nerd • progressive globalisation • reflexive modernisation • scientific expert • scientific insightssocial changesocial networks • team player • The Big Picture • the futurethresholdturbulenceuncertain environmentsuncertainty • universal genius • visions of the futureworld politics • world religions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 FEBRUARY 2012

Overcoding, Coding, and Recoding

"...The social axiomatic of modern societies is caught between two poles and is constantly oscillating from one pole to the other. Born of decoding and deterritorialization, on the ruins of the despotic machine, these societies are caught between the Urstaat that they would like to resuscitate as an overcoding and reterritorializing unity, and the unfettered flows that carry them toward an absolute threshold. They recode with all their might, with world–wide dictatorship, local dictators, and an all–powerful police, while decoding – or allowing the decoding of – the fluent quantities of their capital and their populations. They are torn in two directions: archaism and futurism, neoarchaism and ex–futurism, paranoia and schizophrenia. They vacillate between two poles: the paranoiac despotic sign, the sign–signifier of the despot that they try to revive as a unit of code; and the sign–figure of the schizo as a unit of decoded flux, a schiz, a point–sign or flow–break. They try to hold on to the one, but they pour or flow out through the otaxher. They are continually behind or ahead of themselves."

(Deleuze and Guattari 1983, 260)

TAGS

a point-sign • a schiz • all-powerful • archaism • capital • continually ahead of themselves • continually behind themselves • cultural code • decoded flux • decoding • despot • despotic • despotic machine • deterritorialisation • dictatorship • ex-futurism • Felix Guattariflow • flow-break • flows • fluent quantities • FuturismGilles Deleuzeglobal capital flows • local dictators • neoarchaism • oscillating • overcodingparanoia • paranoiac • pole to pole • police • populations • pour • Recode • resuscitate • reterritorialising unity • schizo • schizophrenia • sign-figure • sign-signifier • social axiomatic of modern societies • societies • threshold • torn in two directions • unfettered flows • Urstaat • vacillate between two poles • world-wide dictatorship

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JANUARY 2004

Liminal Spaces

"Liminal spaces are the spaces in between, thresholds or transitions from one state or space to another.[...]Thresholds and windows are boundaries between inside and outside, public and private; in a car, we experience space in motion, constantly adjusting our perspective.[...]The artists in the exhibition are interested in moments of disjunction where perception is momentarily put into question and the liminal is revealed, challenging the viewer to make connections between one context of meaning and another."
(Center for Curatorial Studies and Art in Contemporary Culture, Bard College)

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TAGS

between • disjunction • interstitialliminal spacespacestatethresholdtransition
05 JANUARY 2004

Simultaneous Cities: Tokyo And Los Angeles

"Item 1: Formulation and programming of simultaneous structures in Los Angeles and Tokyo that serve as thresholds to both cities vis–a–vis the proposed 'Mag Lev' transportation tunnel beneath the Pacific Ocean. An investigation of the invisible realm that exists between the two cities.Item 2: Advancements in transportation, telecommunications and the like are certainly in abundance as the century draws to a close. Yet architecture seems little affected by the onslaught of `progress.' Item 3: Tokyo and Los Angeles are two cities emerging as centres of extreme import as we move beyond the 20th century. Although they are by no means the only two, they do epitomize much of the dichotomies and disparities of the contemporary urban condition. Providing such a service between these two places certainly can be viewed as a perversity of a world caught up in the 'instantaneous' and the conquest of desire.Item 4: the self has always been set against an abstraction of the cosmos and that has emerged from reflection on the mapping of our tangible world. Here then is yet a further reduction of time and space as the experiential is all but eliminated."

[Papadakis, Dr Andreas (ed). 1995 Deconstruction III: Architectural Design Profile No. 87, London, UK: Academy Group. 1854902539]

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TAGS

20th centuryabstractionarchitecturecitycosmosdichotomyinstantaneousinvisibleLos Angeles • Mag Lev • Pacific OceanPapadakisprogrammeprogress • realm • reductionsimultaneousspacespeculative designstructuretangibletelecommunicationthresholdtimeTokyotransport • tunne
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